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  • 251.
    Lundström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lilja, Margareta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gray, David
    Disability and Community Participation Research Office (DACPRO), Washington University School of Medicine.
    Isaksson, Gunilla
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Experiences of participation in everyday occupations among persons aging with a tetraplegia2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 951-957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to gain understanding of participation in everyday occupations through life stories of persons aging with a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Method: A narrative method was used for data collection and a paradigmatic analysis was used to analyze data. Results: The analysis resulted in three themes that illustrate how the participants acted to participate in everyday occupations, how that changed over time, and some concerns about their future. The first theme illustrates how participants following SCI acted to become agents of their lives and participate in everyday occupations. The second theme illustrates how participants had to prioritize participation in meaningful occupations due to personal and environmental factors. The third theme shows how they had to try new strategies to continue participation in occupations, due to secondary health complications related to aging. Conclusions: This study captures how persons aging with tetraplegia acted to participate in everyday occupations from soon after the injury until several decades later. In addition, their ability to act and participate changed over time. Our findings provide knowledge that can guide clinicians in their work within this complex area of rehabilitation. Besides, it can also guide the work with policy recommendations for healthcare and social service systems.Implications for Rehabilitation

  • 252.
    Lysholm, Jack
    et al.
    Linköping University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports and Ttrauma Research Group, Winternet, Bodens sjukhus, Ortopedkliniken, Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken, Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Department of Orthopaedics, Sunderby Hospital.
    Henriksson, Marketta
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    In memoriam Jan Gillquist 1934–20162016In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 253.
    Lysholm, Jack
    et al.
    Winternet.
    Stene, Fredrik
    Winternet.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Test av balans hos elitishockeyspelare på elitnivå efter hjärnskakning2005In: Forskningsrapporter / Centrum för idrottsforskning, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning, CIF , 2005, p. 81-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 254.
    Lysholm, Jack
    et al.
    Winternet.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    A critical review of knee injury rating scales2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 255.
    Lysholm, Jack
    et al.
    Winternet.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Knee injury rating scales2007In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 445-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Lysholm, Jack
    et al.
    Winternet.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Utvärdering av resultat vid knäskada: utveckling av Lysholms och Tegners scorer : den klassiska studien2007In: Idrottsskador: frontlinjen inom behandling och rehabilitering, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning, CIF , 2007, p. 217-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 257.
    Löfgren, Louise
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Perdomo de Pietro, Martina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Pokémon Go - En ny syn på aktivitet2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe children and parents experience of playing PokémonGo, as well as explaining what components motivate to physical activity. Through aqualitative approach, four interviews were conducted with health promotion in focus. Theselection of informants varied between the ages of 7-12 and was of both sexes and at least oneparent. Data analysis allowed us to make a latent interpretation through a content analysiswhich resulted in the following main themes: Pokémon Go contributes to increased physicalactivity and community with friends and family. The result showed that the Pokémon Goinformants created a new attitude towards physical activity and that Pokémon Go as appopened up the possibility of community and physical activity is fun. We hope that this studywill contribute to future research to integrate interactive apps such as Pokémon Go, whichshowed positive effects on young people's physical activity and health.

  • 258.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Doing research together with young people who are not in employment or education: aiming at inclusion and dealing with exclusion2016In: YOUTH MOVES - Voices - Såaces - Subjectivities, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 259.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Umeå University, Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Inside and outside: how young people outside the school system and labor market experience health2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 260.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden..
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    "Thinking about the future, what's gonna happen?": How young people in Sweden who neither work nor study perceive life experiences in relation to health and well-being.2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1422662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore how young people in Sweden who neither work nor study perceive life experiences in relation to health and well-being.

    Methods: A task-based interview technique was used and data was analysed with qualitative content analysis. Interviews were conducted with 16 participants aged 16-20 who were unemployed and not eligible for upper secondary school, or who had dropped out of school.

    Results: Three themes emerged from the analysis illustrating how the young people perceive their life experiences in relation to health and well-being: Struggling with hardships in the absence of caring connections, Feeling good when closely connected to others, and Being forced to question what has been taken for granted. Each theme consists of 2-3 subthemes.

    Conclusion: Based on the young people's narrated experiences health can be understood as: something that is created in relation to others and in relation to the social and cultural context; as something dynamic and changeable; as the ability to adapt and respond to challenges; and finally as something existing on a collective as well as an individual level. Implications for school, social services and health promotion initiatives are discussed, with an emphasis on working with young people.

  • 261.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Using photovoice to promote young migrants health: benefits and challenges with the method2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young migrants are a group that are seldom asked to share their experiences of health. More research focusing on an inside perspective on young migrants health is needed. Through photovoice, young people are given the opportunity to document and discuss their lives by using photography.

    Purpose of study: Illuminating experiences from collaborating with young migrants to promote health using photovoice, focusing on benefits and challenges with the method.

     Methods/Theory: The study was based on a social perspective on health. Photovoice was the chosen method inviting 28 young migrants in a municipality in northern Sweden aged 16-20 from 5 different countries to take pictures and discussing these with focus on experiences and conditions for health and how health can be promoted. The four step process: 1) Introduction, 2) Photographing session, 3) Workshops, and 4) Final presentation.

     Findings: Using photovoice with young migrants enabled insights into several aspects of the participants’ everyday life inside and outside the school context. The participants could identify health promotion factors but also health challenges in their everyday life. More important, it enabled conversations based on the participants' pictures of their lives rather than questions posed by the researcher. The study also revealed ethical challenges addressing power imbalance and how to reach social change, which is further discussed.

     Conclusion: We recommend using photovoice with young migrants as it proved to be a rich tool to promote critical thinking and discussions allowing self-reflection. However, more research is needed to discuss how to reach social change, the last step of the method. 

  • 262.
    Löwden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute, Institute for Psychosocial Medicine/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Holmbäck, Ulf C.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Institute for Psychosocial Medicine/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Karolinska Institutet, Avdelningen för stressforskning, Karolinska institutet, Institute for Psychosocial Medicine/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Forslund, Anders H.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University Hospital, Institute for Psychosocial Medicine/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Forslund, Jeanette M.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University Hospital, Institute for Psychosocial Medicine/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Institute for Psychosocial Medicine/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Time of day type of food--relation to mood and hunger during 24 hours of constant conditions2001In: Journal of Human Ergology, ISSN 0300-8134, Vol. 30, no 1-2, p. 381-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A six-day high-carbohydrate meal (HC; 65 E% (energy percent) carbohydrates, 20 E% fat and 15 E% protein) and a six-day high-fat meal (HF; 40 E% carbohydrates, 45 E% fat and 15 E% protein) were given to seven healthy subjects in a crossover design. On the last day subjects were kept awake for 24 hours in a metabolic laboratory while substrate utilisation and energy expenditure were measured by indirect calorimetry. The subjects were given isocaloric meals every four hours. Results showed that hunger decreased at night (F = 4.2, p < 0.05) and linearly increased after meal intake. Macronutrient composition (fat/carbohydrates) seemed to be of less importance for hunger. Hunger and thirst were found to be strongly associated with gastrointestinal substances, for hunger the strongest being a negative correlation with triacylglycerol (partial correlation = -0.39). It is suggested that it might not be necessary for shift workers to eat full portions at night but that satiation will occur with less food. Possibly lack of adjustment of nocturnal food intake might be one reason why overweight is common in shift work populations.

  • 263.
    Löwden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute, IPM - National Institute of Psychosocial Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Holmbäck, Ulf C.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Karolinska Institutet, Avdelningen för stressforskning, Karolinska institutet.
    Forslund, Jeanette M.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University.
    Forslund, Anders H.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Performance and sleepiness during a 24 h wake in constant conditions are affected by diet2004In: Biological Psychology, ISSN 0301-0511, E-ISSN 1873-6246, p. 251-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of high-carbohydrate (HC) and high-fat (HF) diet on cognitive performance, and subjective and objective sleepiness. Seven male participants were kept awake for 24h in a metabolic ward. Meals were given every 4h and cognitive performance and sleepiness ratings were assessed hourly. The Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT, EEG derived) was performed twice after meal. Performance in simple reaction time showed a significant interaction of diet and the post-prandial period, a slower reaction time was observed for the HC-diet 3.5h after meal intake. Diet did not affect EEG measures but a general post-prandial increase of objective sleepiness was observed 3.5h after meal servings. The HC-diet was significantly associated with an increase of subjective sleepiness. The study demonstrated that the HC-diet caused larger oscillation in performance and increased sleepiness as compared to HF-diet throughout day and night.

  • 264.
    Löwden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute.
    Moreno, C.R.C.
    School of Public Health, University of São Paulo.
    Holmbäck, Ulf C.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Kristianstad University College.
    Tucker, Philip T.
    Department of Psychology, Swansea University.
    Eating and shift work: Effects on habits, metabolism, and performance2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 150-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to individuals who work during the day, shift workers are at higher risk of a range of metabolic disorders and diseases (eg, obesity, cardiovascular disease, peptic ulcers, gastrointestinal problems, failure to control blood sugar levels, and metabolic syndrome). At least some of these complaints may be linked to the quality of the diet and irregular timing of eating, however other factors that affect metabolism are likely to play a part, including psychosocial stress, disrupted circadian rhythms, sleep debt, physical inactivity, and insufficient time for rest and revitalization. In this overview, we examine studies on food and nutrition among shift workers [ie, dietary assessment (designs, methods, variables) and the factors that might influence eating habits and metabolic parameters]. The discussion focuses on the quality of existing dietary assessment data, nutritional status parameters (particularly in obesity), the effect of circadian disruptions, and the possible implications for performance at work. We conclude with some dietary guidelines as a basis for managing the nutrition of shift workers.

  • 265.
    Malamatari, Maria
    et al.
    Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Greenwich, Medway Campus, Chatham Maritime, Kent .
    Ross, Steven A.
    Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Greenwich, Medway Campus, Chatham Maritime, Kent .
    Douroumis, Dennis
    Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Greenwich, Medway Campus, Chatham Maritime, Kent .
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Experimental cocrystal screening and solution based scale-up cocrystallization methods2017In: Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, ISSN 0169-409X, E-ISSN 1872-8294, Vol. 117, p. 162-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cocrystals are crystalline single phase materials composed of two or more different molecular and/or ionic compounds generally in a stoichiometric ratio which are neither solvates nor simple salts. If one of the components is an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the term pharmaceutical cocrystal is often used. There is a growing interest among drug development scientists in exploring cocrystals, as means to address physicochemical, biopharmaceutical and mechanical properties and expand solid form diversity of the API. Conventionally, coformers are selected based on crystal engineering principles, and the equimolar mixtures of API and coformers are subjected to solution-based crystallization that are commonly employed in polymorph and salt screening. However, the availability of new knowledge on cocrystal phase behaviour in solid state and solutions has spurred the development and implementation of more rational experimental cocrystal screening as well as scale-up methods. This review aims to provide overview of commonly employed solid form screening techniques in drug development with an emphasis on cocrystal screening methodologies. The latest developments in understanding and the use of cocrystal phase diagrams in both screening and solution based scale-up methods are also presented. Final section is devoted to reviewing the state of the art research covering solution based scale-up cocrystallization process for different cocrystals besides more recent continuous crystallization methods.

  • 266.
    Maruyoshi, K.
    et al.
    University of Warwick.
    Iuga, D.
    University of Warwick.
    Antzutkin, Oleg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Alhalaweh, Amjad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Brown, S.P.
    University of Warwick.
    Identifying the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding supramolecular synthons in an indomethacin-nicotinamide cocrystal by solid-state NMR2012In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 48, no 88, p. 10844-10846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two-dimensional 1H double-quantum and 14N- 1H & 1H- 13C heteronuclear magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra recorded at natural isotopic abundance identify specific intermolecular COOH⋯N arom and CH arom⋯OC hydrogen-bonding interactions in the solid-state structure of an indomethacin-nicotinamide cocrystal, thus additionally proving cocrystal formation.

  • 267.
    Melder, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Religious Studies/Psychology of Religion.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Existential health: developing and evaluating methods for successful health promotion in a secularized context2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 268.
    Mishra, Amit Kumar
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Rao Vuddanda, Parameswara
    Singh, Sanjay Kumar
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Intestinal lymphatic delivery of praziquantel by solid lipid nanoparticles: Formulation design, in vitro and in vivo studies2014In: Hans Journal of Nanotechnology, ISSN 2161-086X, E-ISSN 2161-0878, Vol. 2014, article id 351693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present work was to design and develop Praziquantal (PZQ) loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (PZQ-SLN) to improve the oral bioavailability by targeting intestinal lymphatic system. PZQ is practically insoluble in water and exhibits extensive hepatic first-pass metabolism. PZQ SLN were composed of triglycerides, lecithin and various aqueous surfactants; were optimized using hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication method. The optimized SLN had particle size of 123 ± 3.41 nm, EE of 86.6 ± 5.72 %. The drug release of PZQ-SLN showed initial burst release followed by the sustained release. Inspite of zeta potential being around -10 mV, the optimized SLN were stable at storage conditions (5 ± 3 °C and 25 ± 2°C/ 60 ± 5 % RH) for six months. TEM study confirmed the almost spherical shape similar to the control formulations. Solid state characterization using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirmed the homogeneous distribution of PZQ within the lipid matrix. The 5.81-fold increase in AUC 0 → ∞, after intraduodenal administration of PZQ-SLN in rats treated with saline in comparison to rats treated with cycloheximide (a blocker of intestinal lymphatic pathway), confirmed its intestinal lymphatic delivery. The experimental results indicate that SLN may offer a promising strategy for improving the therapeutic efficacy and reducing the dose.

  • 269.
    Mitra, Dana
    et al.
    Penn State University.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Brezicha, Kristina
    Georgia State University.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Serriere, Stephanie
    Indiana university.
    Ironies of democracy: Civic mandates in the United States, Sweden, and India2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 270.
    Mitra, Dana
    et al.
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Brezicha, Kristina
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Serriere, Stephanie
    Pennsylvania State University.
    What is the value of democracy in schools?: a comparison of civic skills’ expectations in the United States, Sweden, and India2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the related concepts of civic skills/engagement and life skills across three national contexts—the United States, Sweden, and India. Within the paper, we explore cross-national issues, trends and terminologies of civic skills (and related terms) in curricular policy. We look at differences in content to explore the goals and vision behind civic skill development in these nations. We also look at the locus of civic skill development—in social studies curricula, national goals, and elsewhere. We specifically ask “what kind of people would be created by the policies document? What are the values undergirding the vision for this guiding document?” We conclude by exploring related challenges educational leaders face in the inclusion of civic skills in the purposes of schooling and subsequent curricular policy.

  • 271.
    Mitra, Dana L.
    et al.
    Pennsylvania State University, Department of Education Policy Studies, Penn State University.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Brezicha, Kristina
    Pennsylvania State University, Georgia State University.
    Maithreyi, R.
    Centre for Budget and Policy Studies, Maitri Bhavan, No. 4, Basavanagudi, Bengaluru, Karnataka.
    Serriere, Stephanie
    Pennsylvania State University, Division of Education, Indiana University Purdue University Columbus.
    Ironies of democracy: Purposes of education and the construction of citizens in Sweden, India and the United States2016In: Citizenship Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1751-1917, E-ISSN 1751-1925, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 191-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With relatively few comparative studies of civics curricula in diverse democratic contexts and world regions, this article considers how civic values are negotiated in national curricular policy texts. To explore the purposes of education and the construction of citizens in curricular documents, we layer two theoretical frameworks together - Biesta’s framework examining the purposes of education and Westheimer and Kahne’s framework examining the types of civic education. Looking at curricular frameworks from Sweden, India and the United States, we engaged qualitative content analysis to identify common themes of civic values across these nations: workforce preparation, positioning in society and democratic questioning. We found growing commonality of how ‘citizenry’ is increasingly being defined in terms of individual contributions to the larger enterprises of the nation and the global economy.

  • 272.
    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin
    et al.
    Damascus University, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Facuöty of Pharmacology.
    Alhalaweh, Amjad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Bashimam, Mais
    Damascus University, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Facuöty of Pharmacology.
    Al-Mardini, Mhd Amer
    Damascus University, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Facuöty of Pharmacology.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Utility of Hansen solubility parameters in the cocrystal screening2010In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (JPP), ISSN 0022-3573, E-ISSN 2042-7158, Vol. 62, no 10 - Spec issue, p. 1360-1362Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to test if the miscibility between drug and coformer, as predicted by solubility parameters, can be used as a tool in the cocrystal research. Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSPs) of a model drug, indomethacin and thirty coformers were calculated according to the group contribution method. The distances in HSPs between indomethacin and each cocrystal former were then calculated using three validated miscibility tools. Twenty coformers were predicted and confirmed to be miscible with the drug. Interestingly, all cocrystals forming systems were miscible. Two new cocrystal systems were discovered through this approach. Therefore, the utility of the solubility parameters approach can enhance the effi ciency of cocrystal screening.

  • 273.
    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Damascus University.
    Alhalaweh, Amjad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Hansen solubility parameter as a tool to predict cocrystal formation2011In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 407, no 1-2, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether the miscibility of a drug and coformer, as predicted by Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSPs), can indicate cocrystal formation and guide cocrystal screening. It was also our aim to evaluate various HSPs-based approaches in miscibility prediction. HSPs for indomethacin (the model drug) and over thirty coformers were calculated according to the group contribution method. Differences in the HSPs between indomethacin and each coformer were then calculated using three established approaches, and the miscibility was predicted. Subsequently, differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the experimental miscibility and cocrystal formation. The formation of cocrystals was also verified using liquid-assisted grinding. All except one of the drug-coformers that were predicted to be miscible were confirmed experimentally as miscible. All tested theoretical approaches were in agreement in predicting miscibility. All systems that formed cocrystals were miscible. Remarkably, two new cocrystals of indomethacin were discovered in this study. Though it may be necessary to test this approach in a wide range of different coformer and drug compound types for accurate generalizations, the trends with tested systems were clear and suggest that the drug and coformer should miscible for cocrystal formation. Thus, predicting the miscibility of cocrystal components using solubility parameters can guide the selection of potential coformers prior to exhaustive cocrystal screening work.

  • 274.
    Montenegro-Nicolin, Miguel
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Reyes, Patricio E.
    Instituto de Salud Pública de Chile, Santiago.
    Jara, Miguel O.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Vuddanda, Parameswara Rao
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Neira-Carrillo, Andrónico
    Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Santiago.
    Butto, Nicole
    Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS, )Santiago.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Morales, Javier O.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science. Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    The Effect of Inkjet Printing over Polymeric Films as Potential Buccal Biologics Delivery Systems2018In: AAPS PharmSciTech, ISSN 1530-9932, E-ISSN 1530-9932, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 3376-3387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The buccal mucosa appears as a promissory route for biologic drug administration, and pharmaceutical films are flexible dosage forms that can be used in the buccal mucosa as drug delivery systems for either a local or systemic effect. Recently, thin films have been used as printing substrates to manufacture these dosage forms by inkjet printing. As such, it is necessary to investigate the effects of printing biologics on films as substrates in terms of their physical and mucoadhesive properties. Here, we explored solvent casting as a conventional method with two biocompatible polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, and chitosan, and we used electrospinning process as an electrospun film fabrication of polycaprolactone fibers due to its potential to elicit mucoadhesion. Lysozyme was used as biologic drug model and was formulated as a solution for printing by thermal inkjet printing. Films were characterized before and after printing by mechanical and mucoadhesive properties, surface, and ultrastructure morphology through scanning electron microscopy and solid state properties by thermal analysis. Although minor differences were detected in micrographs and thermograms in all polymeric films tested, neither mechanical nor mucoadhesive properties were affected by these differences. Thus, biologic drug printing on films was successful without affecting their mechanical or mucoadhesive properties. These results open way to explore biologics loading on buccal films by inkjet printing, and future efforts will include further in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

  • 275.
    Montenegro-Nicolini, Miguel
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.
    Miranda, Victor
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Morales, Javier O.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Inkjet Printing of Proteins: an Experimental Approach2017In: AAPS Journal, ISSN 1550-7416, E-ISSN 1550-7416, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 234-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peptides and proteins represent a promissory group of molecules used by the pharmaceutical industry for drug therapy with great potential for development. However, the administration of these molecules presents a series of difficulties, making necessary the exploration of new alternatives like the buccal route of administration to improve drug therapy compliance. Although drop-on demand printers have been explored for small molecule drugs with promising results, the development of delivery systems for peptides and proteins through inkjet printing has seen little development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using a thermal inkjet printing system for dispensing lysozyme and ribonuclease-A as model proteins. To address the absorption limitations of a potential buccal use, a permeation enhancer (sodium deoxycholate) was also studied in formulations. We found that a conventional printer successfully printed both proteins, exhibiting very high printing efficiency. Furthermore, the protein structure was not affected and minor effects were observed in the enzymatic activity after the printing process. In conclusion, we provide evidence for the usage of an inexpensive, easy to use, reliable, and reproducible thermal inkjet printing system to dispense proteins solutions for potential buccal application. Our research significantly contributes to present an alternative for manufacturing biologics delivery systems, with emphasis in buccal applications. Next steps of developments will be aimed at the use of new materials for printing, controlled release, and protection strategies for proteins and peptides

  • 276.
    Montenegro-Nicolini, Miguel
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.
    Morales, Javier O.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science. Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.
    Overview and Future Potential of Buccal Mucoadhesive Films as Drug Delivery Systems for Biologics2017In: AAPS PharmSciTech, ISSN 1530-9932, E-ISSN 1530-9932, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main route of administration for drug products is the oral route, yet biologics are initially developed as injectables due to their limited stability through the gastrointestinal tract and solubility issues. In order to avoid injections, a myriad of investigations on alternative administration routes that can bypass enzymatic degradation and the first-pass effect are found in the literature. As an alternative site for biologics absorption, the buccal route presents with a number of advantages. The buccal mucosa is a barrier, providing protection to underlying tissue, but is more permeable than other alternative routes such as the skin. Buccal films are polymeric matrices designed to be mucoadhesive properties and usually formulated with permeability enhancers to improve bioavailability. Conventionally, buccal films for biologics are manufactured by solvent casting, yet recent developments have shown the potential of hot melt extrusion, and most recently ink jet printing as promising strategies. This review aims at depicting the field of biologics-loaded mucoadhesive films as buccal drug delivery systems. In light of the literature available, the buccal epithelium is a promising route for biologics administration, which is reflected in clinical trials currently in progress, looking forward to register and commercialize the first biologic product formulated as a buccal film

  • 277.
    Montero-Padilla, Soledad
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, 8380494, Santiago.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Morales, Javier O.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, 8380494, Santiago.
    Buccal Dosage Forms: general Considerations for Pediatric Patients2017In: AAPS PharmSciTech, ISSN 1530-9932, E-ISSN 1530-9932, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 273-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of an appropriate dosage form for pediatric patients needs to take into account several aspects, since adult drug biodistribution differs from that of pediatrics. In recent years, buccal administration has become an attractive route, having different dosage forms under development including tablets, lozenges, films, and solutions among others. Furthermore, the buccal epithelium can allow quick access to systemic circulation, which could be used for a rapid onset of action. For pediatric patients, dosage forms to be placed in the oral cavity have higher requirements for palatability to increase acceptance and therapy compliance. Therefore, an understanding of the excipients required and their functions and properties needs to be particularly addressed. This review is focused on the differences and requirements relevant to buccal administration for pediatric patients (compared to adults) and how novel dosage forms can be less invasive and more acceptable alternatives. 

  • 278.
    Morales, Javier O.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.
    Formulation and Delivery of Macromolecules2017In: AAPS PharmSciTech, ISSN 1530-9932, E-ISSN 1530-9932, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 279.
    Morales, Javier O.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences University of Chile.
    Remington: Essentials of Pharmaceutics. By Linda Felton,Pharmaceutical Press, Gurnee, IL, 2013, 784 pages, ISBN:97808571110502015In: Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy, ISSN 0363-9045, E-ISSN 1520-5762, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 529-Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 280.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science. Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago .
    Brayden, David J.
    UCD School of Veterinary Medicine and UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin.
    Buccal delivery of small molecules and biologics: of mucoadhesive polymers, films, and nanoparticles2017In: Current opinion in pharmacology (Print), ISSN 1471-4892, E-ISSN 1471-4973, Vol. 36, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buccal delivery of macromolecules (biologics) sets a great challenge for researchers. Although several niche small molecule products have been approved as simple sprays, tablets and oral films, it is not simply a case of adapting existing technologies to biologics. Buccal delivery of insulin has reached clinical trials with two approaches: oromucosal sprays of the peptide with permeation enhancers, and embedded gold nanoparticles in a dissolvable film. However, neither of these approaches have led to FDA approvals likely due to poor efficacy, submaximal peptide loading in the dosage form, and to wide intra-subject variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. It is likely however that printed film designs with lower molecular weight stable biotech payloads including lipophilic glucagon-like 1 (GLP-1) agonists and macrocycles with long half-lives will generate greater efficacy than was achieved to date for insulin.

  • 281.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Fathe, Kristin R.
    Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin.
    Brunaugh, Ashlee
    Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin.
    Ferrati, Siilvia
    Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin.
    Li, Song
    School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.
    Montenegro-Nicolini, Miguel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.
    Mousavikhamene, Zeynab
    Chemical & Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran.
    McConville, Jason Thomas
    College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.
    Prausnitz, Mark
    dSchool of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.
    Smyth, Hugh David Charles
    Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin.
    Challenges and Future Prospects for the Delivery of Biologics: Oral Mucosal, Pulmonary, and Transdermal Routes2017In: AAPS Journal, ISSN 1550-7416, E-ISSN 1550-7416, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 652-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biologic products are large molecules such as proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, etc., which have already produced many new drugs for clinical use in the last decades. Due to the inherent challenges faced by biologics after oral administration (e.g., acidic stomach pH, digestive enzymes, and limited permeation through the gastrointestinal tract), several alternative routes of administration have been investigated to enable sufficient drug absorption into systemic circulation. This review describes the buccal, sublingual, pulmonary, and transdermal routes of administration for biologics with relevant details of the respective barriers. While all these routes avoid transit through the gastrointestinal tract, each has its own strengths and weaknesses that may be optimal for specific classes of compounds. Buccal and sublingual delivery enable rapid drug uptake through a relatively permeable barrier but are limited by small epithelial surface area, stratified epithelia, and the practical complexities of maintaining a drug delivery system in the mouth. Pulmonary delivery accesses the highly permeable and large surface area of the alveolar epithelium but must overcome the complexities of safe and effective delivery to the alveoli deep in the lung. Transdermal delivery offers convenient access to the body for extended-release delivery via the skin surface but requires the use of novel devices and formulations to overcome the skin’s formidable stratum corneum barrier. New technologies and strategies advanced to overcome these challenges are reviewed, and critical views in future developments of each route are given.

  • 282.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    University of Texas at Austin, College of Pharmacy, 1 University Station .
    Horng, Michelle
    University of Texas at Austin, College of Pharmacy, 1 University Station .
    Gregg, Aubrey M.
    University of Texas at Austin, College of Pharmacy, 1 University Station .
    McConville, Jason T
    University of Texas at Austin, College of Pharmacy, 1 University Station .
    Orally disintegrating tablets using starch and fructose2010In: Pharmaceutical Technology, ISSN 1543-2521, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago .
    Huang, Siyuan
    College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX .
    Williams, Robert O
    College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
    McConville, Jason T
    cCollege of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM .
    Films loaded with insulin-coated nanoparticles (ICNP) as potential platforms for peptide buccal delivery2014In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 122, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this investigation was to develop films containing insulin-coated nanoparticles and evaluate their performance in vitro as potential peptide delivery systems. To incorporate insulin into the films, a new antisolvent co-precipitation fabrication process was adapted to obtain insulin-coated nanoparticles (ICNPs). The ICNPs were embedded in polymeric films containing a cationic polymethacrylate derivative (ERL) or a combination of ERL with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC). ICNP-loaded films were characterized for morphology, mucoadhesion, and insulin release. Furthermore, in vitro insulin permeation was evaluated using a cultured tridimensional human buccal mucosa model. The antisolvent co-precipitation method was successfully adapted to obtain ICNPs with 40% (w/w) insulin load, achieving 323±8nm particles with a high zeta potential of 32.4±0.8mV, indicating good stability. High yields were obtained after manufacture and the insulin content did not decrease after one month storage. ICNP-embedded films using ERL as the polymer matrix presented excellent mucoadhesive and insulin release properties. A high permeation enhancement effect was observed for ICNP-loaded ERL films in comparison with ICNP-loaded ERL-HPMC films and a control insulin solution. ICNP-loaded ERL formulations were found to be more effective in terms of film performance and insulin permeation through the human buccal mucosa model, and thus are a promising delivery system for buccal administration of a peptide such as insulin.

  • 284.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin .
    Joks, Gero M
    bPharmazeutischeTechnologie, Pharmazeutisches Institut der Universität Bonn.
    Lamprecht, Alf
    bPharmazeutischeTechnologie, Pharmazeutisches Institut der Universität Bonn.
    Ross, Alistair C
    Controlled Therapeutics (Scotland) Ltd.
    McConville, Jason T
    College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.
    A design of experiments to optimize a new manufacturing process for high activity protein-containing submicron particles2013In: Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy, ISSN 0363-9045, E-ISSN 1520-5762, Vol. 39, no 11, p. 1793-1801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel method for the manufacture of protein/peptide-containing submicron particles was developed in an attempt to provide particles with increased activity while using high energy input technologies. The method consists of antisolvent co-precipitation from an aqueous solution containing both an amino acid core material (e.g. D,L-valine), and either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (Lys) as model proteins. The aqueous solution was added to the organic phase by means of a nebulizer to increase the total surface area of interaction for the precipitation process. Sonication proved to be an effective method to produce small particle sizes while maintaining high activity of Lys. The use of a polysorbate or sorbitan ester derivatives as stabilizers proved to be necessary to yield submicron particles. Particles with very high yields (approximately 100%) and very high activity after manufacture (approximately 100%) could be obtained. A particle size of 439.0 nm, with a yield of 48.8% and with final remaining activity of 98.7% was obtained. By studying various factors using a design of experiments strategy (DoE) we were able to establish the critical controlling factors for this new method of manufacture.

  • 285.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.
    McConville, Jason T
    College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.
    Manufacture and characterization of mucoadhesive buccal films2011In: European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics, ISSN 0939-6411, E-ISSN 1873-3441, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 187-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The buccal route of administration has a number of advantages including bypassing the gastrointestinal tract and the hepatic first pass effect. Mucoadhesive films are retentive dosage forms and release drug directly into a biological substrate. Furthermore, films have improved patient compliance due to their small size and reduced thickness, compared for example to lozenges and tablets. The development of mucoadhesive buccal films has increased dramatically over the past decade because it is a promising delivery alternative to various therapeutic classes including peptides, vaccines, and nanoparticles. The "film casting process" involves casting of aqueous solutions and/or organic solvents to yield films suitable for this administration route. Over the last decade, hot-melt extrusion has been explored as an alternative manufacturing process and has yielded promising results. Characterization of critical properties such as the mucoadhesive strength, drug content uniformity, and permeation rate represent the major research areas in the design of buccal films. This review will consider the literature that describes the manufacture and characterization of mucoadhesive buccal films.

  • 286.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.
    McConville, Jason T
    College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.
    Novel strategies for the buccal delivery of macromolecules2014In: Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy, ISSN 0363-9045, E-ISSN 1520-5762, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 579-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For years now, the delivery of small molecules through the buccal mucosal route has been described in the literature, but it has only been over the past decade that investigations into macromolecule delivery via the buccal route have sharply increased. The administration of macromolecules such as proteins and peptides, antibodies, or nucleic acids by buccal administration would be greatly enhanced due to the avoidance of the gastrointestinal conditions, rapid uptake into systemic circulation, as well as the potential for controlled drug delivery. Since macromolecules are faced with a number of specific challenges related to permeation through the epithelium, several strategies have been employed historically to improve their buccal absorption and subsequent bioavailability. Several conventional strategies to improve macromolecule penetration include the use of chemical permeation enhancers, enzyme inhibitors and the use of mucoadhesive materials acting as carriers. More recent approaches include the incorporation of the macromolecule as part of nanostructured delivery systems to further enhance targeting and delivery. This review focuses on the different permeation enhancing strategies as well as formulation design that are tailored to meet the challenges of active macromolecule delivery using the buccal mucosal route of administration.

  • 287.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, University of Chile.
    McConville, Jason T
    College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.
    Preface for buccal drug delivery theme issue2014In: Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy, ISSN 0363-9045, E-ISSN 1520-5762, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 577-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past years, buccal drug delivery has attracted the attention of researchers looking for alternative delivery routes of administration. As an alternative to oral drug delivery, the buccal mucosal route avoids the passage through the acidic gastric environment, intestinal and bacterial enzymatic activity, absorption issues associated with the intestinal epithelium (e.g. P-glycoprotein efflux), and the first pass metabolism of the liver. Therefore, the buccal route could be a good delivery route for macromolecules and other drugs not compatible with the gastrointestinal tract environment. This "Buccal Drug Delivery" special edition of Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy aims to bring together a range of different aspects relevant to the growing field of buccal drug delivery. The special edition includes thorough reviews of the literature, as well as original research articles touching on most prominent features related to buccal drug delivery systems, such as the move toward the use of nanotechnology in different ways to facilitate buccal drug delivery with the potential to prompt future product developments.

  • 288.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Advanced Internal Medicine Group, New York, USA.
    Merker, Ludwig
    Diabetes und Nierenzentrum Dormagen, Dormagen, Germany.
    Minimizing Hypoglycemia and Weight Gain with Intensive Glucose Control: Potential Benefits of a New Combination Therapy (IDegLira)2015In: Advances in Therapy, ISSN 0741-238X, E-ISSN 1865-8652, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 391-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes (T2D), the majority of patients require increasing levels of therapy to achieve and maintain good glycemic control. At present, once patients become uncontrolled on oral antidiabetic therapies, the two primary treatment options are glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) or basal insulin, although earlier use of GLP-1RAs has also been advocated. While both of these drug classes have proven efficacy in treating T2D, there can be limitations to their use in some patients, and resistance to further treatment intensification among both patients and physicians. More recently, treatment incorporating both a GLP-1RA and a basal insulin has been used successfully in the clinic and the first such combination product, IDegLira (insulin degludec + liraglutide), has recently been approved for use in Europe. IDegLira combines insulin degludec and the GLP-1RA liraglutide in a single injection. In both insulin-naïve and basal insulin-treated individuals with T2D, IDegLira has demonstrated greater reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) than either of the individual components, with a low rate of hypoglycemia and weight loss. IDegLira may provide a new option for patients requiring treatment intensification but for whom increased weight or a higher risk of hypoglycemia are barriers. This article discusses the rationale behind combining these two drug classes and reviews the available clinical evidence for the efficacy and safety of IDegLira

  • 289.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, University of Chile.
    Montenegro-Nicolini, Miguel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, University of Chile.
    Campano-Hantscheruk, F.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Miranda, Victor
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Inkjet Printing of Biologics Inks and Biologics-Loaded Nanodispersionson Polymeric Films as Potential Buccal Drug Delivery Systems2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 290.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.
    Peters, Jay I.
    Department of Pulmonary Care, College of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
    Williams, Robert O
    Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.
    Surfactants: their critical role in enhancing drug delivery to the lungs2011In: Therapeutic delivery, ISSN 2041-5990, E-ISSN 2041-6008, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 623-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For local lung conditions and diseases, pulmonary drug delivery has been widely used for more than 50 years now. A more recent trend involves the pulmonary route as a systemic drug-delivery target. Advantages such as avoidance of the gastrointestinal environment, different enzyme content compared with the intestine, and avoidance of first-pass metabolism make the lung an alternative route for the systemic delivery of actives. However, the lung offers barriers to absorption such as a surfactant layer, epithelial surface lining fluid, epithelial monolayer, interstitium and basement membrane, and capillary endothelium. Many delivery strategies have been developed in order to overcome these limitations. The use of surfactants is one of these approaches and their role in enhancing pulmonary drug delivery is reviewed in this article. A systematic review of the literature relating to the effect of surfactants on formulations for pulmonary delivery was conducted. Specifically, research reporting enhancement of in vivo performance was focused on. The effect of the addition of surfactants such as phospholipids, bile salts, non-ionic, fatty acids, and liposomes as phospholipid-containing carriers on the enhancement of therapeutic outcomes of drugs for pulmonary delivery was compiled. The main use attributed to surfactants in pulmonary drug delivery is as absorption enhancers by mechanisms of action not yet fully understood. Furthermore, surfactants have been used to improve the delivery of inhaled drugs in various additional strategies discussed herein.

  • 291.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science. College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.
    Ross, Alistair C
    Ferring Controlled Therapeutics Ltd.
    McConville, Jason T
    University of New Mexico.
    Protein-coated nanoparticles embedded in films as delivery platforms2013In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (JPP), ISSN 0022-3573, E-ISSN 2042-7158, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 827-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This work aimed to evaluate the performance of nanoparticle-loaded films based on matrices of polymethacrylates and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) intended for delivery of macromolecules.

    METHODS: Lysozyme (Lys)-loaded nanoparticles were manufactured by antisolvent co-precipitation. After size, loading efficiency and stability characterization, the selected batch of particles was further formulated into films. Films were characterized for mechanical properties, mucoadhesion, Lys release and activity after manufacture.

    KEY FINDINGS: We found that protein-coated nanoparticles could be obtained in USP phosphate buffer pH 6.8. Particles obtained at pH 6.8 had a z-average of 347.2 nm, a zeta-potential of 21.9 mV and 99.2% remaining activity after manufacture. This formulation was further studied for its application in films for buccal delivery. Films loaded with nanoparticles that contained Eudragit RLPO (ERL) exhibited excellent mechanical and mucoadhesive properties. Due to its higher water-swelling and solubility compared with ERL, the use of HPMC allowed us to tailor the release of Lys from films. The formulation composed of equal amounts of ERL and HPMC revealed a sustained release over 4 h, with Lys remaining fully active at the end of the study.

    CONCLUSIONS: Mucoadhesive films containing protein-coated nanoparticles are promising carriers for the buccal delivery of proteins and peptides in a stable form.

  • 292.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, University of Chile.
    Sepulveda-Rivas, Sabrina
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, University of Chile.
    Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, University of Chile.
    Lavandero, Sergio
    Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Chile.
    Kogan, Marcelo J
    Department of Pharmacological and Toxicological Chemistry, University of Chile.
    Novel Nanostructured Polymeric Carriers to Enable Drug Delivery for Cardiovascular Diseases2015In: Current pharmaceutical design, ISSN 1381-6128, E-ISSN 1873-4286, Vol. 21, no 29, p. 4276-4284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Applications of polymeric nanotechnologies for enabling therapies for cardiovascular diseases have shown recent success. Both intravenous and oral administration have been investigated and achieved different degrees of development. While circulating polymeric nanostructured carriers are subjected to a number of interactions, smart nanoparticle design has enabled the formulation of active molecules to be delivered to specific targets for cardiovascular effects. This review aims at outlining the multiple factors that can affect the fate of polymeric nanostructured carriers in systemic circulation. With an understanding of these factors, the literature on the various polymeric nanostructured carriers is reviewed. Finally, the emerging uses of nanotechnology to formulate orally administered drugs for cardiovascular diseases are depicted.

  • 293.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.
    Su, Rong
    Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath.
    McConville, Jason T
    College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.
    The influence of recrystallized caffeine on water-swellable polymethacrylate mucoadhesive buccal films2013In: AAPS PharmSciTech, ISSN 1530-9932, E-ISSN 1530-9932, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 475-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of particles on the properties of polymethacrylate films intended for buccal delivery. A solvent casting method was used with Eudragit RS and RL (ERS and ERL, respectively) as film-forming rate-controlling polymers, with caffeine as a water-soluble model drug. The physicochemical properties of the model films for a series of formulations with increasing concentrations of caffeine were determined in terms of morphology, mechanical and mucoadhesive properties, drug content uniformity, and drug release and associated kinetics. Typically regarded as non-mucoadhesive polymers, ERS and mainly ERL, were found to be good mucoadhesives, with ERL01 exhibiting a work of mucoadhesion (WoA) of 118.9 μJ, which was about five to six times higher than that observed for commonly used mucoadhesives such as Carbopol(®) 974P (C974P, 23.9 μJ) and polycarbophil (PCP, 17.4 μJ). The mucoadhesive force for ERL01 was found to be significantly lower yet comparable to C974P and PCP films (211.1 vs. 329.7 and 301.1 mN, respectively). Inspection of cross-sections of the films indicated that increasing the concentration of caffeine was correlated with the appearance of recrystallized agglomerates. In conclusion, caffeine agglomerates had detrimental effects in terms of mucoadhesion, mechanical properties, uniformity, and drug release at large particle sizes. ERL series of films exhibited very rapid release of caffeine while ERS series showed controlled release. Analysis of release profiles revealed that kinetics changed from a diffusion controlled to a first-order release mechanism.

  • 294.
    Morales, Javier O.
    et al.
    Department of Sciences and Pharmaceutical Technologies, University of Chile, Santos-Dumont, Santiago.
    Valdés, Karina
    Department of Sciences and Pharmaceutical Technologies, University of Chile, Santos-Dumont, Santiago.
    Morales, Javier
    Department of Sciences and Pharmaceutical Technologies, University of Chile, Santos-Dumont, Santiago.
    Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe
    Department of Sciences and Pharmaceutical Technologies, University of Chile, Santos-Dumont, Santiago.
    Lipid nanoparticles for the topical delivery of retinoids and derivatives2015In: Nanomedicine, ISSN 1743-5889, E-ISSN 1748-6963, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 253-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retinoids are lipophilic compounds that are highly used in cosmetics/therapeutics for skin disorders. Conventional formulations are limited by poor water solubility, high chemical/photochemical instability and the irritation of retinoids. Interestingly, lipid nanoparticles enable the administration of retinoids in aqueous media, providing drug stabilization and controlled release. Recently, it has been demonstrated that retinoids in solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, nanoemulsions and nanocapsules can decrease degradation, improve targeting and enhance efficacy for the treatment of skin disorders. This article focuses on the formulation, fabrication, characterization and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, nanoemulsions and nanocapsules loaded with retinoids for skin administration. Furthermore, the incorporation of these lipid nanoparticles into secondary vehicles is discussed.

  • 295.
    Nagarajan, V.
    et al.
    School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar.
    Pedireddia, V.R.
    School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar R.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Hydrated and anhydrous molecular complexes of benzenepentacarboxylic acid and 4,4’-bipyridine2013In: Journal of Molecular Structure, ISSN 0022-2860, E-ISSN 1872-8014, Vol. 1050, p. 216-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supramolecular assemblies of benzenepentacarboxylic acid (BPC) and 4,4’-bipyridine (bpy) as hepta- and di- hydrates in a 2:1 and 1:1 ratios of the respective co-crystal formers, as well as an anhydrous complex of 1:2 ratio have been reported. The three supramolecular complexes [(BPC-)2(bpy2+)(H2O)7], 1a, [(BPC-)(bpy+)(bpy)], 1b and [(BPC2-)(bpy2+)(H2O)2], 1c, were obtained by carrying out co-crystallization experiments at varied conditions. 1a and 1b were obtained at ambient and hydrothermal conditions, resepctively, while 1c also was obtained at hydrothermal conditions but only in the presence of Ni(NO3)2. All the molecular complexes were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction method. Molecules in all the complexes are packed in the form of stacked layers with the realization of host-guest network in 1a and 1c along a crystallographic axis, wherein the host network is formed by BPC and water molecules through different types of hydrogen bonding patterns and bpy molecules remain as guests in the voids, while in 1b, a ladder type network is observed.

  • 296.
    Neely, Gregory
    et al.
    Umeå university, National Institute for Working Life.
    Landström, Ulf
    Statshälsan/Prevab, Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life.
    Byström, Marianne
    Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Swedish Dairy Association.
    Missing a Meal: Effects on Alertness during Sedentary Work2004In: Nutrition and Health, ISSN 0260-1060, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the acute effects of missing a meal on alertness. The participants were ten university students between 20–29 years old, five females and five males. Participants were chosen on the basis of their good sleep and eating practices. Measurements were collected during an eight hour period starting at 8.00 AM on four separate days. During the test period, participants carried out their normal study activities while on separate days receiving either just breakfast, just lunch, both lunch and breakfast, or no meal at all. During the test period, EEG was monitored continuously while subjective ratings of performance and tiredness were collected every half-hour. The results showed that while there were neither physiological nor subjective indications of tiredness which could be attributed to meal consumption, subjective feelings of lack of energy and motivation was significantly more pronounced at the end of the workday when missing a meal or two.

  • 297.
    Nilsson, Ines
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Fitinghoff, Hélène
    Department of Neurotec, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Lilja, Margareta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Continuing to work after the onset of rheumatoid arthritis2007In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 335-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore and describe what have made it possible for a group of people with rheumatoid arthritis to remain in work. There were ten participants, six women and four men, aged from 32 to 59. They were working either full time or part-time, at the time the study was conducted. Data was gathered using focus group interviews. The transcribed interviews were analysed in accordance with the constant comparative method. The result showed that the assets the individuals possessed and the character of the environment in which they worked were important reasons why they were able to remain in employment. Four main categories were identified: the constructive value of work, the characteristics of work, physical health and well-being and the understanding and support of colleagues. The findings support a client-centred occupational therapy and rehabilitation, where the experiences of the person provide the reason for the intervention

  • 298.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hälsa på hal is: Gränsöverskridande byggd miljö för god​ hälsa i kallt klimat2016In: Plan: tidskrift för planering av landsbygd och tätorter, ISSN 0032-0560, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 299.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Sports Medicine, Umea University.
    Högström, Gabriel
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Sports Medicine, Umea University.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Bonnerud, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Malm, Christer
    Winternet.
    Higher muscle mass but lower gynoid fat mass in athletes using anabolic androgenic steroids2012In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 246-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher muscle mass but lower gynoid fat mass in athletes using anabolic androgenic steroids. J Strength Cond Res 26(1): 246-250, 2012-This study evaluated the relationship between anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) use and body constitution. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral density (BMD, g.cm) of the total body, arms, and legs. Total gynoid and android fat mass (grams) and total lean mass (grams) were measured in 10 strength trained athletes (41.4 +/- 7.9 years) who had used AASs for 5-15 years (Doped) and 7 strength trained athletes (29.4 +/- 6.2 years) who had never used AASs (Clean).Seventeen sedentary men (30.3 +/- 2.1 years) served as Controls. Doped athletes had significantly more lean body mass (85.5 +/- 3.8 vs. 75.3 +/- 2.5 vs. 60.7 +/- 1.9, p < 0.001) and a greater index of fat-free/fat mass (5.8 vs. 2.6 vs. 2.5, p < 0.001) compared with Clean athletes and Controls. Doped athletes also had significantly less gynoid fat mass compared with that of Clean athletes (2.8 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.8 +/- 0.2 kg, p = 0.02). There were no differences in BMD between the athletes (p = 0.39-0.98), but both groups had significantly higher BMDs at all sites compared with that of Controls (p = 0.01 to <0.001). Thus, long-term AAS use seems to alter body constitution, favoring higher muscle mass and reduced gynoid fat mass without affecting BMD.

  • 300. Nyberg, Gusten
    et al.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Umeå universitet.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Another aspect of concussion in elite athletes: An increased risk for subsequent traumatic injuries2009Conference paper (Other academic)
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