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  • 351.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    et al.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospita.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala university, Department of Neuroscience and Neurosurgery.
    Höglund, Kina
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospita.
    Portelius, Erik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospita.
    Astroglial activation and altered amyloid metabolism in human repetitive concussion2017In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 88, no 15, p. 1400-1407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether postconcussion syndrome (PCS) due to repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) is associated with CSF biomarker evidence of astroglial activation, amyloid deposition, and blood–brain barrier (BBB) impairment.

    Methods: A total of 47 participants (28 professional athletes with PCS and 19 controls) were assessed with lumbar puncture (median 1.5 years, range 0.25–12 years after last concussion), standard MRI of the brain, and Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ). The main outcome measures were CSF concentrations of astroglial activation markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and YKL-40), markers reflecting amyloid precursor protein metabolism (Aβ38, Aβ40, Aβ42, sAPPα, and sAPPβ), and BBB function (CSF:serum albumin ratio).

    Results: Nine of the 28 athletes returned to play within a year, while 19 had persistent PCS >1 year. Athletes with PCS >1 year had higher RPQ scores and number of concussions than athletes with PCS <1 year. Median concentrations of GFAP and YKL-40 were higher in athletes with PCS >1 year compared with controls, although with an overlap between the groups. YKL-40 correlated with RPQ score and the lifetime number of concussions. Athletes with rcTBI had lower concentrations of Aβ40 and Aβ42 than controls. The CSF:serum albumin ratio was unaltered.

    Conclusions: This study suggests that PCS may be associated with biomarker evidence of astroglial activation and β-amyloid (Aβ) dysmetabolism in the brain. There was no clear evidence of Aβ deposition as Aβ40 and Aβ42 were reduced in parallel. The CSF:serum albumin ratio was unaltered, suggesting that the BBB is largely intact in PCS.

  • 352.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    et al.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Wilson, David H.
    Quanterix Corp, Lexington, MA.
    Randall, Jeffrey
    Quanterix Corp, Lexington, MA.
    Skillbäck, Tobias
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Pazooki, David
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Kallberg, Birgitta
    Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Blood biomarkers for brain injury in concussed professional ice hockey players2014In: JAMA Neurology, ISSN 2168-6149, E-ISSN 2168-6157, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 684-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Lack of objective biomarkers for brain damage hampers acute diagnosis and clinical decision making about return to play after sports-related concussion. OBJECTIVES To determine whether sports-related concussion is associated with elevated levels of blood biochemical markers of injury to the central nervous system and to assess whether plasma levels of these biomarkers predict return to play in professional ice hockey players with sports-related concussion. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter prospective cohort study involving all 12teams of the top professional ice hockey league in Sweden, the Swedish Hockey League. Two hundred eighty-eight professional ice hockey players from 12 teams contesting during the 2012-2013 season consented to participate. All players underwent clinical preseason baseline testing regarding concussion assessment measures. Forty-seven players from 2 of the 12 ice hockey teams underwent blood sampling prior to the start of the season. Thirty-five players had a concussion from September 13, 2012, to January 31, 2013; of these players, 28 underwent repeated blood sampling at 1, 12, 36, and 144 hours and when the players returned to play. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total tau, S-100 calcium-binding protein B, and neuron-specific enolase concentrations in plasma and serum were measured.

  • 353.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    et al.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Wilson, David H.
    Quanterix Corp, Lexington, MA.
    Randall, Jeffrey
    Quanterix Corp, Lexington, MA.
    Skillbäck, Tobias
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Pazooki, David
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Kallberg, Birgitta
    Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Blood biomarkers for brain injury in concussed professional ice hockey players: correction2014In: JAMA Neurology, ISSN 2168-6149, E-ISSN 2168-6157, Vol. 73, no 9, p. 1160-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reports an error in 'Blood biomarkers for brain injury in concussed professional ice hockey players' by Pashtun Shahim, Yelverton Tegner, David H. Wilson, Jeffrey Randall, Tobias Skillbäck, David Pazooki, Birgitta Kallberg, Kaj Blennow and Henrik Zetterberg (JAMA Neurology, 2014[Jun], Vol 71[6], 684-692). In the original article, there were errors in Table 1 and Figure 2A. The corrections are present in the erratum. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-24656-005). Importance: Lack of objective biomarkers for brain damage hampers acute diagnosis and clinical decision making about return to play after sports-related concussion. Objectives: To determine whether sports-related concussion is associated with elevated levels of blood biochemical markers of injury to the central nervous system and to assess whether plasma levels of these biomarkers predict return to play in professional ice hockey players with sports-related concussion. Design, Setting, and Participants: Multicenter prospective cohort study involving all 12 teams of the top professional ice hockey league in Sweden, the Swedish Hockey League. Two hundred eighty-eight professional ice hockey players from 12 teams contesting during the 2012-2013 season consented to participate. All players underwent clinical preseason baseline testing regarding concussion assessment measures. Forty-seven players from 2 of the 12 ice hockey teams underwent blood sampling prior to the start of the season. Thirty-five players had a concussion from September 13, 2012, to January 31, 2013; of these players, 28 underwent repeated blood sampling at 1, 12, 36, and 144 hours and when the players returned to play. Main Outcomes and Measures: Total tau, S-100 calcium-binding protein B, and neuron-specific enolase concentrations in plasma and serum were measured. Results: Concussed players had increased levels of the axonal injury biomarker total tau(median, 10.0 pg/mL; range, 2.0-102 pg/mL) compared with preseason values (median, 4.5pg/mL; range, 0.06-22.7 pg/mL) (P < .001). The levels of the astroglial injury biomarker S-100 calcium-binding protein B were also increased in players with sports-related concussion(median, 0.075 μg/L; range, 0.037-0.24 μg/L) compared with preseason values (median,0.045 μg/L; range, 0.005-0.45 μg/L) (P < .001). The highest biomarker concentrations of total tau and S-100 calcium-binding protein B were measured immediately after a concussion, and they decreased during rehabilitation. No significant changes were detected in the levels of neuron-specific enolase from preseason values (median, 6.5 μg/L; range,3.45-18.0 μg/L) to postconcussion values (median, 6.1 μg/L; range, 3.6-12.8 μg/L) (P = .10). Conclusions and Relevance: Sports-related concussion in professional ice hockey players is associated with acute axonal and astroglial injury. This can be monitored using blood biomarkers, which may be developed into clinical tools to guide sport physicians in the medical counseling of athletes in return-to-play decisions

  • 354.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    et al.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospita.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospita.
    Serum neurofilament light as a biomarker for mild traumatic brain injury in contact sports2017In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 88, no 19, p. 1788-1794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate whether the axonal protein neurofilament light (NFL) in serum is a sensitive biomarker to detect subtle brain injury or concussion in contact sports athletes.

    Methods: Two prospective cohort studies involving (1) 14 Swedish amateur boxers who underwent fluid biomarker assessments at 7–10 days after bout and after 3 months of rest from boxing and (2) 35 Swedish professional hockey players who underwent blood biomarker assessment at 1, 12, 36, and 144 hours after concussion and when the players returned to play were performed. Fourteen healthy nonathletic controls and 12 athletic controls were also enrolled. Serum NFL was measured using ultrasensitive single molecule array technology.

    Results: Serum NFL concentrations were increased in boxers 7–10 days after bout as compared to the levels after 3 months rest as well as compared with controls (p = 0.0007 and p < 0.0001, respectively). NFL decreased following 3 months of rest, but was still higher than in controls (p < 0.0001). Boxers who received many (>15) hits to the head or were groggy after bout had higher concentrations of serum NFL as compared to those who received fewer hits to the head (p = 0.0023). Serum NFL increased over time in hockey players, and the levels returned to normal at return to play. Importantly, serum NFL could separate players with rapidly resolving postconcussion symptoms (PCS) from those with prolonged PCS.

    Conclusions: The results from these 2 independent cohort studies suggest that serum NFL is a highly sensitive biomarker for concussion.

  • 355.
    Shayanfar, Ali
    et al.
    Drug Applied Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Jouyban, Abolghasem
    Drug Applied Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.
    Solubility of carbamazepine, nicotinamide and carbamazepine-nicotinamide cocrystal in ethanol-water mixtures2014In: Fluid Phase Equilibria, ISSN 0378-3812, E-ISSN 1879-0224, Vol. 363, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solubility is an important physiochemical property of pharmaceutical compounds, and cocrystallization is one method used to improve the solubility of drugs. Carbamazepine is a drug from class II, according to the biopharmaceutical classification system, and it forms a cocrystal with nicotinamide. Carbamazepine cocrystallized with nicotinamide was synthesized using the solvent evaporation approach, and its characteristics were determined using differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffractometry. The solubility of various solid phases in ethanol. +. water mixtures was investigated at different temperatures using the shake-flask method, and the resulting precipitates were characterized. The solubility of carbamazepine was increased with the addition of ethanol up to a mass fraction of 0.8. Nevertheless, maximum solubility of NIC is observed in neat solvent (water). While the solubility of a cocrystal depends on the concentration of the coformer and its stability in the solution.

  • 356.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Childs, Scott L.
    Renovo Research, Atlanta, GA.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå universitet, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    New cocrystals of ezetimibe with l-proline and imidazole2014In: CrystEngComm, ISSN 1466-8033, E-ISSN 1466-8033, Vol. 16, no 38, p. 8984-8993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of the study were to screen and prepare cocrystals of anti-cholesterol drug ezetimibe (EZT) with the aim of increasing its solubility and dissolution rate. Thermodynamic phase diagram based high throughput screening was performed using wet milling/grinding or solution crystallization methods. A large number of coformers were tested and the resulting solids were preliminarily characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Potential cocrystals of EZT with l-proline and imidazole and a solvate formamide were identified in the screening experiments. The cocrystal hits were further characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), solution Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) and single crystal XRD. The dissolution properties and stability of cocrystals were determined. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data were obtained for EZT, EZT-IMI cocrystal and formamide solvate of ezetimibe. All three systems were crystallized in non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic space group P212121with Z = 4. Robust O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N, N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds played an important role in all these crystal structures. EZT-PRO cocrystal showed improved apparent solubility and solid state stability

  • 357.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar R.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Al-Hayali, Amani
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Cavanagh, Katie L.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
    Rodríguez- Hornedo, Nair
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
    Velaga, Sitaram P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Tadalafil-malonic acid cocrystal: Physicochemical characterization, pH-solubility and supersaturation studies2018In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 4378-4387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the solubility and dissolution of a poorly water-soluble drug, tadalafil (TDF), by cocrystal formation with malonic acid (MOA), to characterize the cocrystal structure, and to quantify the cocrystal solution behavior. The crystal structure revealed a 1:1 stoichiometry wherein the TDF molecules form a double layered structure through N–H…O=C interactions linked to a catemeric chain of MOA molecules via O-H…O hydrogen bonds. Cocrystal solubility advantage (SA defined as Scocrystal/Sdrug) or supersaturation index was determined from eutectic point measurements to be 102 to 129 in the pH range of 1 to 3. Cocrystal dissolution generated supersaturation levels (Cmax/Sdrug) of 30 in buffer and 120 in the presence of a nucleation inhibitor, HPMC. The amorphous form of TDF generated supersaturation 3 times lower than cocrystal in buffer, and not significantly different from cocrystal in the presence of HPMC. Thus, supersaturation index is a valuable metric for assessing the risk of cocrystal conversion during kinetic studies and for predicting conditions when the usage of a precipitation inhibitor may significantly increase cocrystal exposure levels.

  • 358.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Shah, Faiz Ullah
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Antzutkin, Oleg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Pharmaceutical Crystal Engineering Using Ionic Liquid Anion–Solute Interactions2017In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 1729-1734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of ionic liquids (ILs) in crystal engineering. We have employed ILs with different combinations of cations and anions to study their role in directing crystal structure formation of a nicotinamide (NIC) and oxalic acid (OXA) system. A new crystal form of NIC–OXA salt (2:1) was identified and characterized using standard solid state tools such as powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The crystal structure of the 2:1 salt was elucidated using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The NIC–OXA 2:1 salt form revealed a two-dimensional layered structure, while the known 1:1 salt had a perpendicular “tape-like” structure. The 2:1 salt form could only be crystallized from the ILs possessing hydrogen bond acceptor functionality. We demonstrated that specific ILs could be selected as solvents for altering the solid-state structure of organic and inorganic materials.

  • 359.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    et al.
    Department of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Department of Home Economics, University of Uppsala, National Food Administration.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping.
    Elderly patients' meal patterns: A retrospective study1996In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 263-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine possible causes of malnutrition in geriatric patients on admission to hospital by evaluation and comparison of their meal pattern between periods of working, retirement and hospitalization, respectively. Forty-five consecutive patients aged 60 years or older participated. By use of modified dietary history interviews, a retrospective assessment of food intake was carried out. A qualitative system for meal classification was then applied. In the retirement period there was a strong reduction in daily eating frequency when compared to working and hospital periods. Thus, the daily intake and also distribution of energy and nutrients seem to be reduced during retirement, which might lead to nutritional deficiency.

  • 360.
    Siman, Robert
    et al.
    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Neurosurgery.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Mölndal.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Smith, Douglas H.
    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Neurosurgery.
    Serum SNTF Increases in Concussed Professional Ice Hockey Players and Relates to the Severity of Post-Concussion Symptoms2015In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 32, no 17, p. 1294-1300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomarkers for diffuse axonal injury could have utilities for the acute diagnosis and clinical care of concussion, including those related to sports. The calpain-derived alpha-spectrin N-terminal fragment SNTF accumulates in axons after traumatic injury, and increases in human blood following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in relation to white matter abnormalities and persistent cognitive dysfunction. However, SNTF has never been evaluated as a biomarker for sports-related concussion. Here, we conducted longitudinal analysis of serum SNTF in professional ice hockey players, 28 of whom had a concussion, along with 45 players evaluated during the preseason, 17 of whom were also tested after a concussion-free training game. Compared to preseason levels, serum SNTF increased at 1 hour after concussion and remained significantly elevated from 12 hours to 6 days, before declining to preseason baseline. In contrast, serum SNTF levels were unchanged after training. In eight players, post-concussion symptoms resolved within a few days, and in these cases serum SNTF levels were at baseline. On the other hand, for the 20 players withheld from play for 6 days or longer, serum SNTF levels rose from 1 hour to 6 days post-concussion, and at 12-36 hours differed significantly from the less severe concussions (p=.004). Serum SNTF exhibited diagnostic accuracy for concussion, especially so with delayed return to play (AUC = 0.87). Multivariate analyses of serum SNTF and tau improved the diagnostic accuracy, the relationship with the delay in return to play, and the temporal window beyond tau alone. These results provide evidence that blood SNTF, a biomarker for axonal injury after mTBI, may be useful for diagnosis and prognosis of sports-related concussion, and for guiding neurobiologically-informed decisions on return to play

  • 361.
    Singh, Bhupender L.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi .
    Rao Vuddanda, Parameswara
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi .
    Vijayakumar, M.R.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi .
    Kumar, Vinod
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Saxena, Preeti Suman
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Singh, Sanjay
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Cefuroxime axetil loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for enhanced activity against S. aureus biofilm2014In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 121, p. 92-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present research work is focused on the development of solid lipid nanoparticles of cefuroxime axetil (CA-SLN) for its enhanced inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus produced biofilm. CA-SLN was prepared by solvent emulsification/evaporation method using single lipid (stearic acid (SA)) and binary lipids (SA and tristearin (TS)). Process variables such as volume of dispersion medium, concentration of surfactant, homogenization speed and time were optimized. The prepared SLN were characterized for encapsulation efficiency, drug polymer interaction studies (DSC and FT-IR), shape and surface morphology (SEM and AFM), in vitro drug release, stability studies and in vitro anti biofilm activity against S. aureus biofilm. Among the process variables, increased volume of dispersion medium, homogenization speed and time led to increase in particle size whereas increase in surfactant concentration decreased the particle size. SLN prepared using binary lipids exhibited higher entrapment efficiency than the single lipid. DSC and FT-IR studies showed no incompatible interaction between drug and excipients. CA-SLN showed two folds higher anti-biofilm activity in vitro than pristine CA against S. aureus biofilm.

  • 362.
    Singh, Sanjay Kumar
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanas.
    Dadhania, Parth
    Pharma Research, Lupin Limited (Research Park), Pune.
    Vuddanda, Parameswara Rao
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Jain, Achint K.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanas.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Singh, Sanjay
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanas.
    Intranasal delivery of asenapine loaded nanostructured lipid carriers: formulation, characterization, pharmacokinetic and behavioural assessment2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 2032-2045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present research work was to develop asenapine (ASM) loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (ANLC) for the delivery of drugs in the brain by an intranasal route to enhance therapeutic efficacy. A quality by design approach was used for development and optimization of ANLC. A total of five independent variables were selected, in which three were compositions and two were process variables, while particle size and entrapment efficiency were selected as response variables. The final optimized batch was evaluated by various in vitro characterizations as well as in vivo brain and plasma pharmacokinetic studies. Finally, the ANLC was assessed for efficacy and safety profiling for upto three weeks by a behavior model viz. catalepsy, induced locomotor and paw test in Charles Foster rats. The observed particle size, entrapment efficiency and zeta potential of ANLC was found to be 167.30 +/- 7.52 nm, 83.50 +/- 2.48% and -4.33 +/- 1.27 mV, respectively. Surface characterization studies demonstrated a spherical shape with a smooth surface of ANLC which follows the Korsmeyer-Peppas in vitro release kinetic model (r(2) = 0.9911, n = 0.53). A brain pharmacokinetic study indicated a significantly higher (p < 0.05) peak drug concentration (C-max: 74.13 +/- 6.73 ng mL(-1)), area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC(0-24) (h): 560.93 +/- 27.85 h ng mL(-1)) and mean residence time (MRT: 7.1 +/- 0.13 h) of ANLC compared to ASM in the brain via an intranasal route. The results of behaviour studies of ANLC showed a significant decrease in extra-pyramidal side effects with increasing antipsychotic effect after 1-2 week(s) of treatment. These findings demonstrate that nanostructured lipid carriers could be a new promising drug delivery system for intranasal delivery of asenapine in the treatment of schizophrenia

  • 363.
    Singh, Sanjay Kumar
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Kushwaha, Anand Kumar
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi .
    Rao Vuddanda, Parameswara
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi .
    Karunanidhi, Priyanka
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi .
    Singh, Sanjay
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Development and evaluation of solid lipid nanoparticles of raloxifene hydrochloride for enhanced bioavailability2013In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2013, article id 584549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raloxifene hydrochloride (RL-HCL) is an orally selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) with poor bioavailability of nearly 2% due to its poor aqueous solubility and extensive first pass metabolism. In order to improve the oral bioavailability of raloxifene, raloxifene loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have been developed using Compritol 888 ATO as lipid carrier and Pluronic F68 as surfactant. Raloxifene loaded SLN were prepared by solvent emulsification/evaporation method, and different concentrations of surfactant, and homogenization speed were taken as process variables for optimization. SLN were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, and crystallinity of lipid and drug. In vitro drug release studies were performed in phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 using dialysis bag diffusion technique. Particle sizes of all the formulations were in the range of 250 to 1406 nm, and the entrapment efficiency ranges from 55 to 66%. FTIR and DSC studies indicated no interaction between drug and lipid, and the XRD spectrum showed that RL-HCL is in amorphous form in the formulation. In vitro release profiles were biphasic in nature and followed Higuchi model of release kinetics. Pharmacokinetics of raloxifene loaded solid lipid nanoparticles after oral administration to Wistar rats was studied. Bioavailability of RL-HCL loaded SLN was nearly five times than that of pure RL-HCL

  • 364.
    Singh, Sanjay Kumar
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Singh, Sanjay
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Rao Vuddanda, Parameswara
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Srivastava, Avinash Kumar
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University.
    A comparison between use of spray and freeze drying techniques for preparation of solid self-microemulsifying formulation of valsartan and in vitro and in vivo evaluation2013In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2013, article id 909045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the present study was to develop self micro emulsifying formulation (SMEF) of valsartan to improve its oral bioavailability. The formulations were screened on the basis of solubility, stability, emulsification efficiency, particle size and zeta potential. The optimized liquid SMEF contains valsartan (20% w/w), Capmul MCM C8 (16% w/w), Tween 80 (42.66% w/w) and PEG 400 (21.33% w/w) as drug, oil, surfactant and co-surfactant, respectively. Further, Liquid SMEF was adsorbed on Aerosol 200 by spray and freeze drying methods in the ratio of 2: 1 and transformed into free flowing powder. Both the optimized liquid and solid SMEF had the particle size <200 nm with rapid reconstitution properties. Both drying methods are equally capable for producing stable solid SMEF and immediate release of drug in in vitro and in vivo conditions. However, the solid SMEF produced by spray drying method showed high flowability and compressibility. The solid state characterization employing the FTIR, DSC and XRD studies indicated insignificant interaction of drug with lipid and adsorbed excipient. The relative bioavailability of solid SMEF was approximately 1.5 to 3.0 folds higher than marketed formulation and pure drug. Thus, the developed solid SMEF illustrates an alternative delivery of valsartan as compared to existing formulations with improved bioavailability

  • 365.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    From 9 to 91 in good health: the health promoting role of the inner child through the life course2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 366.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Health promotion through the life span with an intergenerational perspective: Like two peas in a pod2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 367.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    The child is the father of the man: what is health promoting when you look upon the inner child’s presence through life?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 368.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Useful life lessons for health and well-being: adults' reflections of childhood experiences illuminate the phenomenon of the inner child2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1441592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe and gain more knowledge about the phenomenon of the inner child in relation to health and well-being reflected in events during childhood experienced by adults. Method: In this hermeneutical phenomenological study, 20 adults, 10 men and 10 women aged 22–68, were interviewed. Results: The analysis of the data illuminated the phenomenon of the inner child in one theme: Gaining useful life lessons through childhood experiences, made up by four sub-themes: Sharing relationshipsplaying to healbeing strong or frail and supporting the next generationConclusion: The participants’ experiences of events during childhood were illuminating the phenomenon of the inner child as promoting or hindering health and well-being and impact human adaptation throughout life. Our findings indicate that the participants learned useful life lessons suggesting that experiences during childhood can help us to adapt across the life span and over generations, and this is the essence of the inner child. Our findings also contribute to the health literacy discussion and detail how knowledge and action competency is developed in mental, social and existential dimensions of health and well-being.

  • 369.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Prellwitz, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Health throughout the lifespan: The phenomenon of the inner child reflected in events during childhood experienced by older persons2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and gain more knowledge of the phenomenon of the inner child, reflected in events during childhood experienced by older persons. Thirteen older persons aged 70 to 91 years old were interviewed. A hermeneutical phenomenological analysis of the data revealed two main themes: the inner child becomes visible and the inner child's presence through life. The participants' narratives showed that their understanding of the experiences included both positive and negative feelings, as well as ways to be creative, in which the inner child became visible. The participants' experiences indicated that the inner child was present throughout the lifespan, was found in challenges that occurred in life, and could turn something bad into something good. However, the presence of the inner child could also be a source for development throughout life and could interfere with the person. The findings from this study point to older persons' need to be recognized, acknowledged, and understood as a unique person living his or her own life. In addition, dimensions of well-being such as feeling safe, loved, supported, and creating space for fantasy and possibilities can be compared to the physical, mental, social, and existential dimensions of well-being found in WHO surveys and definitions of health. This calls for a holistic approach when caring for older persons.

  • 370.
    Sngh, Yuvraj N.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanas.
    Vuddanda, Parameswara Rao
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Jain, Achint K.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanas.
    Parihar, Sarita
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varaansi.
    Chaturvedi, Thakur P.
    Department of Orthodontics, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varaansi.
    Singh, Sanjay Kumar
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanas.
    Mucoadhesive gel containing immunotherapeutic nanoparticulate satranidazole for treatment of periodontitis: Development and its clinical implications2015In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 59, p. 47659-47670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to alleviate shortcomings in periodontal treatment by utilizing a mucoadhesive gel containing immunotherapeutic ganglioside coated polymeric nanoparticles (G-PNP) bearing satranidazole (SZ). Nanoprecipitation was used to fabricate SZ loaded G-PNP. In our previous deliberations aqueous dispersibility of conventional SZ had raised dose consistency issues. Usage of G-PNP allayed those fears as DSC and XRD data showed that SZ was rendered amorphous (more water dispersible than crystalline SZ) when captured in a polymeric matrix of nanoparticles. G-PNP were added to sodium carboxy methyl cellulose (SCMC 30 NP) gels and compared against SCMC 30 (gel containing conventional SZ) for texture, mucoadhesion, drug release and inhibitory susceptibility of Aggregatibacter actinomycetomicans. Subsequently a 21 day single blind clinical trial comparing the efficacy of SCMC 30 NP and SCMC 30 was conducted. SCMC 30 NP showed a maximum mucoadhesion force (43.27 ± 4.10 gf), low hardness (12.28 ± 0.17 N), moderate gel strength (8.53 ± 0.21 N) and elasticity (5.50 ± 0.03 mm). 'Well' diffusion data revealed qualitatively greater antibacterial activity of SCMC 30 NP. Dissolution studies demonstrated diffusion controlled release of SZ at concentrations above MIC. SCMC 30 NP caused a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in clinical markers of periodontitis, i.e. gingival index and pocket depth as compared to SCMC 30. Also reduction in the plaque index produced by SCMC 30 NP was highly significant (P < 0.01) as compared to SCMC 30 at the end of the 21st day of clinical study. Amelioration of disease was improved due to Th-2 biased immuno shifting mediated by G-PNPs, which increased secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines like IL-4 and TGF-β from J774 macrophages. Clinical benefits incurred along with ease of application calls for a scaled up investigation of SCMC 30 NP

  • 371.
    Sohlman, Eiri
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Johansen, Ole Martin
    Department of Education at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, campus Alta.
    Ryzhkova, Inna
    Murmansk State Humanities University.
    Experiences of Cross-Border Collaboration to Promote Schoolchildren’s Health2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences, 2015, p. 323-328Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 372.
    Sohlman, Eiri
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Johansen, Ole Martin
    Department of Education at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, campus Alta.
    Ryzhkova, Inna
    Murmansk State Humanities University.
    Together for Schoolchildren’s Health!: Arguments for Cross-border Collaboration to Promote Schoolchildren’s Health through ICT Applications in the Barents Region2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences, 2015, p. 27-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 373.
    Sohlman, Eiri
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi.
    Kostenius, CatrineLuleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.Johansen, Ole MartinDepartment of Education at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, campus Alta.Ryzhkova, InnaMurmansk State Humanities University.Merivirta, MinttuRovaniemi University of Applied Sciences.
    Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 374.
    Sojka, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå univesity.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Playing soccer increases serum concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain damage S-100B and neuron-specific enolase in elite players: a pilot study2004In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 899-909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To analyse serum concentrations of two biochemical markers of brain tissue damage, S-100B and NSE (neurone-specific enolase), in male soccer players in connection to the game. METHODS: Blood samples were taken in players before and after a competitive game and the numbers of headers and of trauma events during soccer play were assessed. RESULTS: Both S-100B and NSE were significantly raised in serum samples obtained after the game in comparison with the pre-game values (S-100B: 0.118 +/- 0.040 microg L(-1) vs 0.066 +/- 0.025 microg L(-1), p < 0.001; NSE: 10.29 +/- 2.16 microg L(-1) vs 8.57 +/- 2.31 microg L(-1), p < 0.001). Only changes in S-100B concentrations (post-game minus pre-gae values) were statistically significantly correlated to the number of headers (r = 0.428, p = 0.02) and to the number of other trauma events (r = 0.453, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Playing competitive elite soccer was found to cause increase in serum concentrations of S-100B and NSE. Increases in S-100B were significantly correlated to the number of headers, and heading may accordingly have contributed to these increases.

  • 375.
    Sojka, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    S-100B, a marker of brain damage: a useful tool in the managment of mild traumatic brain injuries in sport2002In: Neurological rehabilitation: proceedings of the 3rd world congress, Venice, Italy, April 2-6, 2002, Bologna: ISPRM , 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 376.
    Srivastava, K.
    et al.
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.
    Khan, E.
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Tandon, P.
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.
    Sinha, K.
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Molecular structure and hydrogen bond interactions of a paracetamol-4,4′-bipyridine cocrystal studied using a vibrational spectroscopic and quantum chemical approach2018In: CrystEngComm, ISSN 1466-8033, E-ISSN 1466-8033, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 213-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current study is to perform the structural and spectroscopic characterization of paracetamol-4,4′-bipyridine (PRA-BPY) cocrystal using infrared, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To reveal the interactions between PRA and BPY, two models (monomer and dimer + PRA) of a cocrystal are designed and optimized using DFT with a 6-311G (d, p) basis set. An atoms in molecule study shows that the non-covalent interactions in particular hydrogen bonds involved in forming the cocrystal are moderate in nature. Natural bond orbital analysis of the second order perturbation theory of the Fock matrix suggests that interactions LP (1) N13 → π∗(C15-O16) and LP (1) N56 → σ∗(N13-H14) are responsible for the stabilization of the molecule. 

  • 377.
    Srivastava, Karnica
    et al.
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Srivastava, Anubha
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow.
    Tandon, Poonam
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow.
    Sinha, Kirti
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Vibrational analysis and chemical activity of paracetamol-oxalic acid cocrystal based on monomer and dimer calculations: DFT and AIM approach2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 10024-10037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of structural and spectral characteristics of a paracetamol-oxalic acid (PRA-OXA) cocrystal has been carried out using two models (monomer and dimer), with the aim to understand the supramolecular structure and intramolecular interactions within the cocrystal. The cocrystal has been characterized by infrared and Raman spectroscopy combined with quantum chemical calculations molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS), frontier orbital analysis and electronic reactivity descriptors were used to understand the role of interactions involved in affecting the chemical reactivity of individual molecules in the cocrystal. It is observed that the C=O, N-H and O-H groups of paracetamol are involved in hydrogen bonds to form cocrystals. NBO analysis suggests that the two types of interactions LP(1)(N8) -> pi*(C9-O10) and LP(2)(O10) -> sigma*(O25-H28) are responsible for the stability of the molecule. AIM analysis suggested that the non-covalent interactions are moderate in nature. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energies reveal that the charge transfer occurs within the cocrystal. Chemical reactivity parameters show that the cocrystal is more active than paracetamol.

  • 378.
    Srivastava, Karnica
    et al.
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.
    Shukla, Anuradha
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.
    Karthick, T.
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India;Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Tandon, Poonam
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.
    Sinha, Kirti
    Physics Department, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar R.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Molecular structure, spectroscopic signature and reactivity analyses of paracetamol hydrochloride monohydrate salt using density functional theory calculations2019In: CrystEngComm, ISSN 1466-8033, E-ISSN 1466-8033, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 857-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to understand the role of the intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions present in paracetamol hydrochloride monohydrated salt. Paracetamol hydrochloride monohydrate salt (PRA-HCl) and paracetamol (form I) were investigated via vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) to gain insight into the hydrogen bond patterns present in these crystalline materials. Two different density functionals, wB97X-D and M062X, were used for the comparison of the results. The geometrical parameters of PRA-HCl and form I obtained using these functional were compared with the crystallographic data, which proved the existence of intra-molecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The C10O2 group of form I forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond, while the O1–H18 group of PRA-HCl forms an intermolecular hydrogen bond with a chloride ion (Cl), resulting in the elongation of the bond length and shift to a lower wavenumber for the O1–H18 group. To examine the potency of hydrogen bonding, quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) calculations were performed and the results suggested that O1–H18⋯Cl22 is a strong intermolecular hydrogen bond. The chemical reactivity parameters reveal that the PRA-HCl and PRA-OXA cocrystals are more reactive and softer (low HOMO–LUMO energy gap) in comparison to paracetamol (form I).

  • 379.
    Stattin, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala university, Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck laboratory.
    Familial osteochondritis dissecans associated with early osteoarthritis and disproportionate short stature2008In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 890-896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Familial osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a rare disorder characterised by disturbed chondro-skeletal development, disproportionate growth and deformation of the skeleton.Design: We identified a five-generation family with 15 living affected members from Northern Sweden. The disorder was diagnosed with a case definition of OCD in at least one joint. Results: Main clinical findings consisted of OCD in knees and/or hips and/or elbows, disproportionate short stature and early osteoarthritis (OA). There were no radiological indications of epiphyseal dysplasia. Anthropometric measurements of affected individuals showed short stature, a high ratio between sitting height and total height, a relatively normal arm span and head circumference. In 12 of 15 cases, onset was during late childhood or adolescence and OA had developed in seven of those patients.Conclusions: Our observation suggests that OA is a frequent complication in familial OCD even though the lesions appear before closure of physis.

  • 380.
    Stattin, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Umeå universitetssjukhus.
    WIklund, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindblom, Karin
    Lund University.
    Önnerfjord, Patrik
    Lund University.
    Jonsson, Björn-Anders
    Umeå universitetssjukhus.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sasaki, Takako
    University of Erlangen-Nuernberg.
    Struglics, André
    Lund University.
    Lohmander, Stefan
    Lund University.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University.
    Heinegård, Dick
    Lund University.
    Aspberg, Anders
    University of Copenhagen.
    A missense mutation in the aggrecan C-type lectin domain disrupts extracellular matrix interactions and causes dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans2010In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 126-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteochondritis dissecans is a disorder in which fragments of articular cartilage and subchondral bone dislodge from the joint surface. We analyzed a five-generation family in which affected members had autosomal-dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans. A genome-wide linkage analysis identified aggrecan (ACAN) as a prime candidate gene for the disorder. Sequence analysis of ACAN revealed heterozygosity for a missense mutation (c.6907G > A) in affected individuals, resulting in a p.V2303M amino acid substitution in the aggrecan G3 domain C-type lectin, which mediates interactions with other proteins in the cartilage extracellular matrix. Binding studies with recombinant mutated and wild-type G3 proteins showed loss of fibulin-1, fibulin-2, and tenascin-R interactions for the V2303M protein. Mass spectrometric analyses of aggrecan purified from patient cartilage verified that V2303M aggrecan is produced and present in the tissue. Our results provide a molecular mechanism for the etiology of familial osteochondritis dissecans and show the importance of the aggrecan C-type lectin interactions for cartilage function in vivo.

  • 381.
    Stattin, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Karolinska institutet, Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala university, Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck laboratory.
    AGC1 gene missense mutation associated with familial osteochondritis dissecans and early osteoarthritis2007In: 8th Meeting of the International Skeletal Dysplasia Society: Albi, France July 19-22, 2007, International Skeletal Dysplasia Society , 2007, p. 6-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 382.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Backman, Helena
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Umeå University.
    Eklund, Britt-Marie
    The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care. Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Adolescent girls with asthma have worse asthma control and health-related quality of life than boys: A population based study2017In: Pediatric Pulmonology, ISSN 8755-6863, E-ISSN 1099-0496, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 866-872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Population-based studies investigating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among asthmatic adolescents are rare. Further, among subjects with asthma, HRQoL may be affected by asthma control and severity.

    Aim

    To investigate HRQoL in relation to asthma control and asthma severity among adolescents.

    Method

    As a part of the population-based OLIN pediatric study, 266 adolescents with current asthma (14-15 yr) were identified. N = 247 completed the DISABKIDS HRQoL asthma module, including the domains impact and worry. The Asthma Control Test (ACT) was used and a disease severity score was calculated based on symptoms and medicine use.

    Results

    The prevalence of current asthma was 11%. Well-controlled asthma was reported by 15% of the adolescents, and 53% had partly controlled asthma. The prevalence of uncontrolled asthma was significantly higher among girls than boys (38% vs 25%), and girls also reported lower HRQoL scores. There was a fairly strong correlation between the ACT and DISABKIDS scores. Independent risk factors for low HRQoL impact (a score <67) were female sex (OR 4.66, 95%CI 1.82-9.54) and decreased ACT scores (1.38, 1.18-1.62). Risk factors for low HRQoL worry (a score <70) were female sex (3.33, 1.41-7.86), decreased ACT scores (1.35, 1.16-1.57), severe asthma (6.23, 1.46-16.50), and having current eczema (2.68, 1.00-7.24).

    Conclusion

    Only a minority of the asthmatic adolescents reported well-controlled asthma, and poor asthma control and female sex were risk factors for low HRQoL. Our results demonstrate that evaluation of asthma control is of great importance for asthma management.

  • 383.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Fatigue and decreased health can predict mortality in COPD2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 384.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Norrbottens Läns Landsting.
    Lindberg, Anne
    OLIN studies, Norrbotten County Council.
    Fatigue affects health status and predicts mortality among subjects with COPD-report from the population-based OLIN COPD study2015In: COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1541-2555, E-ISSN 1541-2563, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 199-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: COPD is associated to increased fatigue, decreased health status and mortality. However, these relationships are rarely evaluated in population-based studies. Aims: To describe the relationship between health status, respiratory symptoms and fatigue among subjects with and without COPD. Further, to evaluate whether fatigue and/or health status predicts mortality in these groups. Methods: Data were collected in 2007 from the population-based OLIN COPD study. Subjects participated in lung function tests and structured interviews, and 434 subjects with and 655 subjects without COPD were identified. Fatigue was assessed by FACIT-Fatigue and health status by the generic SF-36 questionnaire including physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) components. Mortality data until February 2012 were collected. Results: Fatigue greatly impacts the physical and mental dimensions of health status, both among subjects with and without COPD. Among subjects with clinically significant fatigue, COPD subjects had significantly lower PCS-scores compared to non-COPD subjects. Fairly strong correlations were found between FACIT-F, SF-36 PCS and MCS, respectively. In multivariate models adjusting for covariates, increased fatigue, decreased physical and mental dimensions of health status were all associated to mortality in subjects with COPD (OR 1.06, CI 1.02-1.10, OR 1.04, CI 1.01-1.08 and OR 1.06, CI 1.02-1.10), but not in non-COPD. Conclusions: Fatigue and decreased health status were closely related among subjects with and without COPD. Not only physical health status, but also fatigue and mental health predicted mortality among subjects with COPD. Fatigue assessed by FACIT-F, can be a useful instrument of prognostic value in the care of subjects with COPD.

  • 385.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Lindberg, Anne
    NLL.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Creating a balance between breathing and viability: Experiences of well-being when living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2015In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe experiences of well-being among people with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). BACKGROUND: Living with COPD is related to a complex life situation, and quality of life (QOL) is shown to decrease because of respiratory symptoms and fatigue. However, studies describing well-being in COPD as a subjective description of QOL are rare. METHODS: Ten participants with moderate to very severe COPD from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) COPD study were interviewed about their experiences of well-being. A latent qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings To achieve well-being despite breathlessness, the participants had to adapt to their limitations and live towards the future. They created a balance between breathing and viability by adjusting to a lifelong limitation, handling variations in illness, relying on self-capacity and accessibility to a trustful care. The participants adjusted to lifelong limitations through acceptance and replacement of former activities. They handled variations in illness by taking advantage of the good days and using emotional adaptation strategies. The participants relied on their own self-capacity, feeling that smoking cessation, physical activity and breathing fresh air increased their well-being. They requested accessibility to a trustful care and highlighted the need for continuous care relationships and access to medications. These findings can enhance health-care professionals' understanding of the possibilities for increased well-being for people living with COPD.

  • 386.
    Strinnholm, Åsa
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Umeå University.
    Winberg, Anna
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Lindh, Viveka
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
    Reintroduction failure is common among adolescents after double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 282-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    There has been a lack of research on adolescents' who undergo double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate food allergic adolescents' experiences and consequences of double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges.

    METHODS:

    This qualitative, descriptive interview study included 17 adolescents aged 14-15 years with total elimination of cows' milk, hens' eggs or cod due to food allergies. The participants, who were initially identified from a large population-based cohort study, were interviewed 18 months after completing their challenges.

    RESULTS:

    The double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge proved to be a complex experience for the adolescents, involving fear of potential reactions and the hope that the food could be reintroduced. Experiences during the challenge were described in three themes: facing fears in a secure environment, being hesitant but curious about unknown tastes and waiting for unknown food reactions. Experiences after the challenge were desribed in two themes: gaining control and freedom and continuing old habits. A negative challenge was not consistently associated with the reintroduction of the challenged food.

    CONCLUSION:

    This study highlighted the importance of considering the adolescents' expectations and experiences of the challenge and the reintroduction process to ensure desirable changes in their dietary habits. Follow ups should be performed regardless of the outcome of challenges.

  • 387.
    Strömbäck, Ulrica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Sunderby Research Unit, Umeå University.
    Vikman, Irene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Time from onset of symptoms to medical presence at the first and at the second myocardial infarction: a comparative study2013In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 57, no Suppl. 120, p. 27-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 388.
    Strömbäck, Ulrica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Vikman, Irene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Sunderby Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University.
    Lundqvist, Robert
    Department of Research, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    The second myocardial infarction: Higher risk factor burden and earlier second myocardial infarction in women compared to men : The Northern Sweden MONICA study2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Several studies have examined various parameters and experiences when patients suffer their first myocardial infarction (MI), but knowledge about when they suffer their second MI is limited.

    AIM:

    To compare risk factors for MI, that is, diabetes, hypertension and smoking, for the first and second MI events in men and women affected by two MIs and to analyse the time intervals between the first and second MIs.

    METHODS:

    A retrospective cohort study of 1017 patients aged 25-74 years with first and second MIs from 1990 through 2009 registered in the Northern Sweden MONICA registry.

    RESULTS:

    More women than men have diabetes and hypertension and are smokers at the first MI. Similar differences between the genders remain at the time of the second MI for diabetes and hypertension, although both risk factors have increased. Smoking decreased at the second MI without any remaining difference between genders. Women suffer their second MI within a shorter time interval than men do. Within 16 months of their first MI, 50% of women had a second MI. The corresponding time interval for men was 33 months.

    CONCLUSION:

    Patients affected by an MI should be made aware of their risk of recurrent MI and that the risk of recurrence is highest during the first few years after an MI. In patients affected by two MIs, women have a higher risk factor burden and suffer their second MI earlier than men do and thus may need more aggressive and more prompt secondary prevention.

  • 389.
    Strömbäck, Ulrica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Vikman, Irene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Sunderby Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University.
    Lundqvist, Robert
    Department of Research, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    The second myocardial infarction: Women have a higher risk factor burden and suffer a second myocardial infarction earlier than men do. The Northern Sweden MONICA study2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S62-S63, article id 165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 390.
    Strömgren, Frida
    et al.
    GIH, Stockholm.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kenttä, Göran
    GIH, Stockholm.
    Risberg, Anitha
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hormone Smart Health Promotion: A Psychologica Perspective of Young and Adult Female Athletes Menstrual Status and Well=being2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 391.
    Stylianou, Fotos
    et al.
    Computational Sciences Laboratory (UCY-CompSci), Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus.
    Pečnik, René
    Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology.
    Kassinos, Stavros C.
    Computational Sciences Laboratory (UCY-CompSci), Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus.
    A general framework for computing the turbulence structure tensors2015In: Computers & Fluids, ISSN 0045-7930, E-ISSN 1879-0747, Vol. 106, p. 54-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Good measures of the turbulence structure are important for turbulence modeling, flow diagnostics and analysis. Structure information is complementary to the componentality anisotropy that the Reynolds stress tensor carries, and because structures extend in space, structure information is inherently non-local. Given access to instantaneous snapshots of a turbulence field or two-point statistical correlations, one can extract the structural features of the turbulence. However, this process tends to be computationally expensive and cumbersome. Therefore, one-point statistical measures of the structural characteristics of turbulence are desirable. The turbulence structure tensors are one-point statistical descriptors of the non-local characteristics of the turbulence structure and form the mathematical framework for constructing Structure-Based Models (SBM) of turbulence. Despite the promise held by SBM, the tensors have so far been available only in a small number of DNS databases of rather simple canonical flows. This inhibits further SBM development and discourages the use of the tensors for flow analysis and diagnostics. The lack of a clear numerical recipe for computing the tensors in complex domains is one the reasons for the scarce reporting of the structure tensors in DNS databases. In particular, the imposition of proper boundary conditions in complex geometries is non-trivial. In this work, we provide for the first a time a rigorous and well-documented description of a mathematical and computational framework that can be used for the calculation of the structure tensors in arbitrary turbulent flow configurations

  • 392.
    Stylianou, Fotos
    et al.
    Computational Sciences Laboratory (UCY-CompSci), Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus.
    Pečnik, René
    Process & Energy Department, Delft University of Technology.
    Kassinos, Stavros C.
    Computational Sciences Laboratory (UCY-CompSci), Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus.
    Analyzing a turbulent pipe flow via the one-point structure tensors: Vorticity crawlers and streak shadows2016In: Computers & Fluids, ISSN 0045-7930, E-ISSN 1879-0747, Vol. 140, p. 450-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efforts to identify and visualize near-wall structures typically focus on the region y+≳5, where large-scale structures with significant turbulent kinetic energy content reside, such as the high-speed and low-speed streaks associated with sweep and ejection events. While it is true that the level of the turbulent kinetic energy drops to zero as one approaches the wall, the organization of near-wall turbulence does not end at y+≈5. Large-scale structures with significant streamwise extent and spatial organization exist even in the immediate proximity of the wall y+<5. These coherent structures have received less attention so far, but it would be both useful and enlightening to bring them to focus in order, on one hand, to understand them, but also to analyze their interaction with the energetic structures that reside at somewhat higher distances from the wall. We have recently developed a rigorous mathematical and computational framework that can be used for the calculation of the turbulence structure tensors in arbitrary flow configurations. In this work, we use this new framework to compute, for the first time, the structure tensors in a fully-developed turbulent pipe flow. We perform Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) at Reynolds number Reb=5300, based on the bulk velocity and the pipe diameter. We demonstrate the diagnostic properties of the structure tensors, by analyzing the DNS results with a focus on the near-wall structure of the turbulence. We develop a new eduction technique, based on the instantaneous values of the structure tensors, for the identification of inactive structures (i.e. large-scale structures without significant turbulent kinetic energy). This leads to the visualization of “vorticity crawlers” and “streak shadows”, large-scale structures with low energy content in the extreme vicinity of the wall. Furthermore, comparison with traditional eduction techniques (such as instantaneous iso-surfaces of turbulent kinetic energy) shows that the structure-based eduction method seamlessly captures the large-scale energetic structures further away from the wall. We then show that the one-point structure tensors reflect the morphology of the inactive structures in the extreme vicinity of the wall and that of the energy-containing large-scale structures further away from the wall. The emerging complete picture of large-scale structures helps explain the near-wall profiles of all the one-point structure tensors and is likely to have an impact in the further development of Structure-Based Models (SBMs) of turbulence

  • 393.
    Stylianou, Fotos
    et al.
    Computational Sciences Laboratory (UCY-CompSci), Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus.
    Sznitman, Josué
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa.
    Kassinos, Stavros C.
    Computational Sciences Laboratory (UCY-CompSci), Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus.
    Direct numerical simulation of particle laden flow in a human airway bifurcation model2016In: International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, ISSN 0142-727X, E-ISSN 1879-2278, Vol. 61, p. 677-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the delivery of inhaled medicines, and depending on the size distribution of the particles in the formulation, airway bifurcations are areas of preferential deposition. Previous studies of laminar flow through airway bifurcations point to an interplay of inertial and centrifugal forces that leads to rich flow phenomena and controls particle deposition patterns. However, recent computational studies have shown that the airflow in the upper human airways is turbulent during much of the respiratory cycle. The question of how the presence of turbulence modifies these effects remains open. In this study, we perform for the first time Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulent flow through a single human airway bifurcation model, emulating steady prolonged inspiration and expiration. We use the rich information obtained from the DNS in order to identify key structures in the flow field and scrutinize their role in determining deposition patterns in the bifurcation. We find that the vortical structures present in the bifurcation during expiration differ from those identified during inspiration. While Dean vortices are present in both cases, a set of three dimensional “carinal vortices” are identified only during expiration. A set of laminar simulations in the same geometries, but at lower Reynolds numbers, allow us to identify key differences in aerosol deposition patterns between laminar and turbulent respiration. We also report deposition fractions for representative Stokes numbers for both laminar and turbulent conditions. Given the suspected role of external mechanical stress on the airway epithelium in determining mucus clearance and chronic disease development, here we report wall shear stress distributions for both the turbulent and laminar cases. Finally, we also perform Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations for the same configuration in order to asses their performance as compared to DNS. We find that LES and RANS perform well and that they are able to capture the key characteristics of the flow field. The agreement between DNS and RANS holds true only for the mean flow field, which is primarily influenced by curvature effects

  • 394.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Ohlsson, A.
    Umeå University, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Sports Medicine.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sojka, Peter
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Serum concentrations of two biochemical markers of brain tissue damage S-100B and neurone specific enolase are increased in elite female soccer players after a competitive game2006In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 313-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is a matter of debate whether or not ordinary heading of the ball in soccer causes injury to brain tissue. OBJECTIVE: To analyse concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain tissue damage S-100B and neurone specific enolase (NSE) in serum of female elite soccer players in association with a competitive game. METHODS: Venous blood samples were obtained from 44 female soccer players before and after a competitive game for analysis. The number of headers and trauma events (falls, collisions, etc) was assessed from videotape recordings for each player. RESULTS: Concentrations of both brain damage markers were increased after the game (S-100B, 0.18 (0.11) v 0.11 (0.05) microg/l (p = 0.000); NSE, 10.14 (1.74) v 9.05 (1.59) microg/l (p = 0.001)). There was a significant correlation between changes in S-100B concentrations and both the number of headers (r = 0.430, p = 0.004) and the number of other trauma events (r = 0.517, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The concentrations of both S-100B and NSE were increased by game associated activities and events. The increases in S-100B concentration were significantly related to the number of headers and other trauma events, which indicates that both these factors may have contributed to these increases.

  • 395.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Sojka, Peter
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Kan hjärnvävnadsskademarkören S-100B användas som prediktor av lämplig tidpunkt för återgång till aktiv idrottsutövning efter lätt skallskada/hjärnskakning?2001In: Program & sammanfattningar: Svenska Läkaresällskapets riksstämma, Svenska läkaresällskapet , 2001, p. 309-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 396.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Sojka, Peter
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Matchspel ökar serumkoncentrationen av hjärnvävnadsskademarkören S-100B hos ichockey- och basketspelare2001In: Program & sammanfattningar: Svenska Läkaresällskapets riksstämma, Svenska läkaresällskapet , 2001, p. 203-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 397.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Magnusson, Nils-Göran
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Sojka, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Can the marker of brain damage S-100B be used for prediction of time for return to sport after mild heal injury/concussion2002In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 803-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 398.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sojka, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Does heading in soccer have impact on brain tissue?: a field study using analysis of markers of brain tissue injury S-100B and NSE2004In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 655-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 399.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sojka, Peter
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Playing ice hockey and basketball increases serum levels of S-100B in elite players: a pilot study2003In: Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1050-642X, E-ISSN 1536-3724, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 292-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in serum concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain damage S-100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in ice hockey and basketball players during games. DESIGN: Descriptive clinical research. SETTING: Competitive games of the Swedish Elite Ice Hockey League and the Swedish Elite Basketball League. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-six male ice hockey players (from two teams) and 18 basketball players (from two teams). INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: S-100B and NSE were analyzed using two-site immunoluminometric assays. The numbers of acceleration/deceleration events were assessed from videotape recordings of the games. Head trauma-related symptoms were monitored 24 hours after the game using the Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire. RESULTS: Changes in serum concentrations of S-100B (postgame - pregame values) were statistically significant after both games (ice hockey, 0.072 +/- 0.108 microg/L, P = 0.00004; basketball, 0.076 +/- 0.091 microg/L, P = 0.001). In basketball, there was a significant correlation between the change in S-100B (postgame-pregame values) and jumps, which were the most frequent acceleration/deceleration (r = 0.706, P = 0.002). For NSE, no statistically significant change in serum concentration was found in either game. For one ice hockey player who experienced concussion during play, S-100B was increased more than for the other players. CONCLUSIONS: S-100B was released into the blood of the players as a consequence of game-related activities and events. Analysis of the biochemical brain damage markers (in particular S-100B) seems to have the potential to become a valuable additional tool for assessment of the degree of brain tissue damage in sport-related head trauma and probably for decision making about returning to play.

  • 400.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sojka, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Playing soccer causes increases in serum concentration of the biomechanical markers of brain damage S-100B and NSE in elite players2003In: Proceedings of the 2nd world congress of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine - ISPRM: Prague, Czech Republic, May 18-22, 2003 : [free papers] / [ed] Nachum Soroker; Haim Ring, Bologna: ISPRM , 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
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