Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 71 of 71
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Lönnqvist, Joel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Farrell, Claire
    School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Melbourne, 500, Yarra Boulevard, Richmond, Victoria 3121, Australia.
    Schrieke, Dean
    School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Melbourne, 500, Yarra Boulevard, Richmond, Victoria 3121, Australia.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Plant water use related to leaf traits and CSR strategies of 10 common European green roof species2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 890, article id 164044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vegetation layer contributes to multiple functions of green roofs including their hydrological function as plants remove water from substrates between rainfall events through evapotranspiration, restoring the green roofs storage capacity for rainfall retention. While individual traits have been related to water use strategies of green roof plants, these traits are inconsistent, suggesting the importance of trait combinations which may be reflected in CSR (competitor, stress tolerator, ruderal) strategies. Therefore, relating plant water use to leaf traits and CSR strategies could help facilitate green roof plant selection into new geographical regions where green roof technology is developing. For example, in high latitude northern European regions with long daylight during the growing season. Growth (shoot biomass, relative growth rate and leaf area), leaf traits (leaf dry matter content, specific leaf area and succulence) and CSR strategies were determined of 10 common European green roof plants and related to their water use under well-watered (WW) and water-deficit (WD) conditions. All three succulent species included in the experiment showed mostly stress tolerant traits and their water loss was less than the bare unplanted substrate, likely due to mulching of the substrate surface. Plants with greater water use under WW conditions had more ruderal and competitive strategies, and greater leaf area and shoot biomass, than species with lower WW water use. However, the four species with the highest water use under WW conditions were able to downregulate their water use under WD, indicating that they could both retain rainfall and survive periods of water limitations. This study indicates that, for optimal stormwater retention, green roof plant selection in high latitude regions like northern Europe, should focus on selecting non-succulent plants with predominantly competitive or ruderal strategies to make the most of the long daylight during the short growing season.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 52.
    Mjelde, Marit
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Trondheim.
    Hellsten, Seppo
    Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), University of Oulu.
    Ecke, Frauke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    A water level drawdown index for aquatic macrophytes in Nordic lakes2013In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 704, no 1, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many northern lakes are regulated to enhance hydropower production and flood protection. This bears hydromorphological pressures which are important factors causing lowered ecological status. Water level fluctuation triggers erosion on the shoreline and, depending on fluctuation range, also affects species composition or disappearance of sensitive aquatic macrophytes. We developed a water leveldrawdown index (WIc) for Nordic lakes using macrophytedata from 73 lakes with varying water level fluctuation in Finland, Norway and Sweden. The index is based on the ratio between sensitive and tolerant macrophyte species. The sensitive and tolerant species are identified based on a percentile approach, analysing the presence or absence of species along the winter drawdown range. The index correlates well with winter drawdown in Finnish and Norwegian lakes with strongest correlations with winter drawdown in storage lakes (lakes regulated for hydroelectric power and with a considerable winter drawdown). The WIcindex is applicable in low alkalinity, oligotrophic and ice-covered lakes, and is suggested to be a useful tool to identify and designate heavily modified water bodies in Nordic lakes according to the European Water Framework Directive.

  • 53.
    Nolander, Carl
    et al.
    Government Offices of Sweden, 103 33 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundmark, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences. ETKS/Economics, Luleå University of Technology, 971 87 Luleå, Sweden.
    A Review of Forest Ecosystem Services and Their Spatial Value Characteristics2024In: Forests, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 15, no 6, article id 919Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forests provide a variety of resources and benefits, but only a few, such as timber, are traded on the markets. Ecosystem service valuation is a method for quantifying the non-market benefits of forests to understand the full costs of forest management. This review examines the forest ecosystem service valuations over the past 20 years, with a particular focus on their spatial modeling. The literature review method is designed to provide a systematic, explicit, and reproducible outcome concerning the valuations of forest ecosystem services and the contextual setting of these valuations. The findings suggest that there is a huge variation in the values reported for similar ecosystem services but that carbon sequestration, recreation in forests, and hydrological services, such as watershed protection and flood prevention, are the ecosystem services that are consistently valued highly in the reviewed studies. In the last ten years, studies have more frequently modeled ecosystem services in spatial terms.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 54.
    Nordblad, Fredrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Rodushkin, Ilya
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Luleå, Sweden.
    Engström, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Luleå, Sweden.
    Ecke, Frauke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Öhlander, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ingri, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Stream water geochemistry of boron and boron isotopes in a small boreal catchment affected by a major forest fire2009In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 73, no 13, Supp. S, p. A952-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research [1] has suggested that the boron (B) isotope system has a potential to be used as a tracer for detecting historic wood fire events. It was hypothesized that highly elevated B concentrations in sediments of a lake, accompanied by an enrichment of 10B, were a result of an urban wood fire event in the 19th century. The δ11B decrease in these sediments exceeded 9 ., coinciding with a peak in the B concentration.To evaluate this hypothesis, seasonal isotopic pattern of boron (B) was investigated during spring and summer 2007 in a small stream draining a boreal forest area which was severely burnt in a major forest fire in the summer of 2006. Dissolved (< 0.22 µm) boron concentrations of the burnt area were significantly higher compared to a non-burnt reference stream, while 11B/10B ratios were significantly lower. Dissolved δ11B differences between the reference and the burnt area stream were found to be -9 to -22 .. We interpret the elevated B concentrations, accompanied by enrichment of 10B, in the burnt stream as wood and plant ash leaching of biogenic B from the burnt forest by surface run-off. Our results suggest that a boreal forest fire event significantly increases the leached amount of isotopically lighter B in the dissolved phase of stream run-off.[1] Peltola & Åström (2006), Appl. Geochem. 21 (2006) 941-948.

  • 55.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Bettiga, Maurizio
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden; Bioeconomy Division, EviKrets Biobased Processes Consultants, Landvetter, Sweden.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Microbial genetic engineering approach to replace shark livering for squalene2022In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1261-1273Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squalene is generally sourced from the liver oil of deep sea sharks (Squalus spp.), in which it accounts for 40–70% of liver mass. To meet the growing demand for squalene because of its beneficial effects for human health, three to six million deep sea sharks are slaughtered each year, profoundly endangering marine ecosystems. To overcome this unsustainable practice, microbial sources of squalene might offer a viable alternative to plant- or animal-based squalene, although only a few microorganisms have been found that are capable of synthesizing up to 30% squalene of dry biomass by native biosynthetic pathways. These squalene biosynthetic pathways, on the other hand, can be genetically manipulated to transform microorganisms into 'cellular factories' for squalene overproduction.

  • 56.
    Paulsson, Oscar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Widerlund, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Diel variations in dissolved oxygen concentration and algal growth in the Laver pit lake, northern Sweden2023In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 155, article id 105725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diel oxygen technique relying on automated in-situ measurements of dissolved oxygen was used as an indicator of seasonal and diurnal variations of photosynthesis in the circumneutral Laver pit lake in northern Sweden. From July to September 2017, surface water temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen were continuously measured at a time resolution of 30 min using sensors mounted on a floating buoy. The data could be monitored in real-time using a browser-based software and permitted calculation of gross primary production (GPP), net ecosystem production (NEP), and respiration (R) in the lake. The dissolved O2 concentration showed a consistent pattern of diel variations that reached up to 0.5 mg L−1 during the warmer summer period (July–August). Towards the end of August these variations decreased in magnitude and remained at ∼0.1 mg L−1 throughout September. pH showed diel variations that mimicked those of dissolved O2, with maximum daily variations of 0.4–0.5 pH units during July and August. A seven-day moving average of GPP showed a peak during July to mid-August, and the maximum GPP value of 0.55 mg O2 L−1 day−1 is similar to those found in natural oligotrophic lakes. A phytoplankton sample showed a total biomass concentration of 24 μg L−1, with the species Chrysophyceae, Chlorophyta, and Bacillariophyta occurring in the water. Diel oxygen data indicated that respiration by autotrophs and respiration of autochthonous labile organic matter by heterotrophs dominated in the lake, as is often the case in lakes where planktonic primary production is the main supplier of labile organic carbon. A close coupling between R and GPP suggests that nearly all GPP was respired in the epilimnion. The study shows that the diel oxygen technique can be used for real-time monitoring of seasonal and diurnal variations of dissolved oxygen and pH in pit lakes. This would be a useful technique in pit lake remediation projects where fertilization is used to stimulate algal growth and metal sequestering by algae.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 57.
    Paulsson, Oscar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Widerlund, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Conrad, Sarah
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Stimulating algal growth through wood ash fertilization in the Åkerberg pit lake, northern Sweden2023In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 151, article id 105616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen microcosms were installed in the Åkerberg pit lake for 15 days in the summer season (July) 2021. To stimulate algal growth, the microcosms were fertilized with two P-rich wood ashes, and KNO3. Chlorophyll-a was used as an indicator of algal growth while filtered (<0.2 μm) and particulate suspended element concentrations (>0.2 μm) were used to estimate algal metal uptake. Water quality measurements and water sampling were conducted on three occasions (every five days) and at the start of the experiment to monitor algal growth. The chlorophyll-a concentration in the microcosms fertilized with wood ash increased from 0.3-0.8 μg/L at the start of the experiment to 53–77 μg/L after 15 days. Algal element uptake of filtered concentrations (<0.2 μm) was observed for many elements including, Ni (33–36%), Zn (22–65%) and Cd (22–54%). This suggests that wood ash could be used to stimulate algal growth in pit lakes by acting as a source for P and potentially also other nutrients. The highest chlorophyll-a concentrations were seen on day 10, indicating that a breakdown of chlorophyll-a impacted the measured concentrations, which otherwise could have been higher.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 58.
    Pekka, Larissa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Halmeenpää, Hanna
    North Ostrobothnia Regional Centre, Oulu, Finland.
    Ecke, Frauke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. nternational Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Vuori, Kari-Matti
    Finnish Environment Institute, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Mokrotovarova, Olga
    Murmansk Areal Department for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring, Murmansk, Russia.
    Öhlander, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ingri, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Assessing pollution in the Kola River, northwestern Russia, using metal concentrations in water and bryophytes2008In: Boreal environment research, ISSN 1239-6095, E-ISSN 1797-2469, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intensive Cu-Ni and Fe mining and smelting in northwestern Russia constitutes a potential risk of pollution in the Kola River. We assessed the degree of pollution along the Kola River by means of overall water quality evaluation and analyses of metals in water samples (dissolved and particulate fractions) and aquatic mosses. The observed pollutant levels were compared with those in unpolluted reference rivers. The results indicate relatively low overall contamination in the Kola River, although Cu and Ni levels are elevated relative to the reference data. Furthermore, PCA ordination models identified clear metal concentration patterns along the river. Al, Cd, Co, Fe, Pb and Zn exhibited an almost continuous increase from the headwaters to the river mouth, whereas As, Ba, Cu, Mn, Mo and Ni showed their highest concentrations in the headwaters, close to the mining areas, relatively low concentrations in the middle parts of the river and elevated concentrations at the river mouth. Bryophyte analysis appeared to be a more sensitive tool for metal pollution assessment than metal concentrations in water.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 59.
    Penning, W. Ellis
    et al.
    Deltares, P.O. Box 177, 2600 MH, Delft, The Netherlands; NIOO-CL, P.O. Box 1299, 3600 BG, Maarssen, The Netherlands.
    Dudley, B.
    CEH, Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB, UK.
    Mjelde, M.
    NIVA, Gaustadalléen 21, 0349, Oslo, Norway.
    Hellsten, S.
    SYKE, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 413, 90014, Oulu , Finland.
    Hanganu, J.
    DDNI, Tulcea, Romania.
    Kolada, A.
    Institute for Environmental Protection, Warszawa, Poland.
    van den Berg, M.
    Rijkswaterstaat RIZA, P.O. Box 17, 8200 AA, Lelystad, The Netherlands.
    Poikane, S.
    Joint Research Centre, 21020, Ispra, Italy.
    Phillips, G.
    Environment Agency for England and Wales, Reading, RG1 8DQ, UK.
    Willby, Nigel
    University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK.
    Ecke, Frauke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Using aquatic macrophyte community indices to define the ecological status of European lakes2008In: Aquatic Ecology, ISSN 1386-2588, E-ISSN 1573-5125, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 253-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defining the overall ecological status of lakes according to the Water Framework Directive (WFD) is to be partially based on the species composition of the aquatic macrophyte community. We tested three assessment methods to define the ecological status of the macrophyte community in response to a eutrophication pressure as reflected by total phosphorus concentrations in lake water. An absolute species richness, a trophic index (TI) and a lake trophic ranking (LTR) method were tested at Europe-wide, regional and national scales as well as by alkalinity category, using data from 1,147 lakes from 12 European states. Total phosphorus data were used to represent the trophic status of individual samples and were plotted against the calculated TI and LTR values. Additionally, the LTR method was tested in some individual lakes with a relatively long time series of monitoring data. The TI correlated well with total P in the Northern European lake types, whereas the relationship in the Central European lake types was less clear. The relationship between total P and light extinction is often very good in the Northern European lake types compared to the Central European lake types. This can be one of the reasons for a better agreement between the indices and eutrophication pressure in the Northern European lake types. The response of individual lakes to changes in the abiotic environment was sometimes represented incorrectly by the indices used, which is a cause of concern for the use of single indices in status assessments in practice.

  • 60.
    Penning, W.E.
    et al.
    Deltares, Delft.
    Mjelde, M.
    NIVA, Oslo.
    Dudley, B.
    CEH, Edinburgh.
    Hellsten, S.
    SYKE, University of Oulu.
    Hanganu, F.
    DDNI, Tulcea.
    Kolada, A.
    Institute for Environmental Protection, Warszawa.
    Van Den Berg, M.
    Rijkswaterstaat RIZA, Lelystad.
    Poikane, S.
    Joint Research Centre, Ispra.
    Phillips, G.
    Environment Agency for England and Wales, Reading.
    Willby, N.
    University of Stirling.
    Ecke, Frauke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Classifying aquatic macrophytes as indicators of eutrophication in European lakes2008In: Aquatic Ecology, ISSN 1386-2588, E-ISSN 1573-5125, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 237-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aquatic macrophytes are one of the biological quality elements in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) for which status assessments must be defined. We tested two methods to classify macrophyte species and their response to eutrophication pressure: one based on percentiles of occurrence along a phosphorous gradient and another based on trophic ranking of species using Canonical Correspondence Analyses in the ranking procedure. The methods were tested at Europe-wide, regional and national scale as well as by alkalinity category, using 1,147 lakes from 12 European states. The grouping of species as sensitive, tolerant or indifferent to eutrophication was evaluated for some taxa, such as the sensitive Chara spp. and the large isoetids, by analysing the (non-linear) response curve along a phosphorous gradient. These thresholds revealed in these response curves can be used to set boundaries among different ecological status classes. In total 48 taxa out of 114 taxa were classified identically regardless of dataset or classification method. These taxa can be considered the most consistent and reliable indicators of sensitivity or tolerance to eutrophication at European scale. Although the general response of well known indicator species seems to hold, there are many species that were evaluated differently according to the database selection and classification methods. This hampers a Europe-wide comparison of classified species lists as used for the status assessment within the WFD implementation process.

  • 61.
    Poohphajai, Faksawat
    et al.
    Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, 00076, Aalto, Finland; InnoRenew CoE, Livade 6a, 6310, Izola, Slovenia.
    Myronycheva, Olena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Belt, Tiina
    Production Systems, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Tietotie 2, 02150, Espoo, Finland.
    Rautkari, Lauri
    Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, 00076, Aalto, Finland.
    Sandak, Jakub
    InnoRenew CoE, Livade 6a, 6310, Izola, Slovenia; Andrej Marušič Institute, University of Primorska, Titov trg 4, 6000, Koper, Slovenia.
    Gubenšek, Ana
    InnoRenew CoE, Livade 6a, 6310, Izola, Slovenia.
    Zalar, Polona
    University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, SI-1000, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Gunde-Cimerman, Nina
    University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, SI-1000, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Sandak, Anna
    InnoRenew CoE, Livade 6a, 6310, Izola, Slovenia; Andrej Marušič Institute, University of Primorska, Titov trg 4, 6000, Koper, Slovenia; Faculty of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Information Technologies, University of Primorska, Glagoljaška 8, 6000, Koper, Slovenia.
    Fungal colonisation on wood surfaces weathered at diverse climatic conditions2023In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 9, no 6, article id e17355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural weathering test at two different European climatic zones were conducted to investigate simultaneously both, the fungal colonisation and weathering process of Scots pine wood (Pinus sylvestris L.). The hypothesis was that the wood performing differently in various climate conditions might affect fungal infestation. The colour changes, wettability, and glossiness were measured as indicators of weathering progress of wood together with an assessment of fungal diversity. Different intensities in weathering, occupancy, and colonisation of fungi on wooden surface were detected. A higher number of fungal species was found on wood exposed to the warm temperate climates compared to subarctic or boreal climates. The dominant fungal species in both locations were from the genera Cladosporium and Aureobasidium.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 62.
    Rodushkin, Ilya
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Engström, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Sörlin, Dieke
    ALS Scandinavia AB.
    Baxter, Douglas
    ALS Scandinavia AB.
    Hörnfeldt, Birger
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Nyholm, Erik
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Ecke, Frauke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Uptake and accumulation of anthropogenic Os in free-living bank voles (Myodes glareolus)2011In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 218, no 1-4, p. 603-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osmium tetroxide (OsO4) is one of the most toxic air contaminants but its environmental effects are poorly understood. Here, for the first time, we present evidence of osmium uptake in a common herbivore (bank vole, Myodes glareolus) in boreal forests of northern Sweden. Voles (n = 22) and fruticose arboreal pendular lichens, the potential main winter food source of the vole, were collected along a spatial gradient to the west of a steelwork in Tornio, Finland at the Finnish-Swedish border. 187Os/188Os isotope ratios increased and osmium concentrations decreased in lichens and voles along the gradient. Osmium concentrations in lichens were 10,000-fold higher than those in voles. Closest to the steelwork, concentrations were highest in kidneys rather than skin/fur that are directly exposed to airborne OsO4. The kidney-to-body weight ratio was higher at the two localities close to the steelwork. Even though based on a small sample size, our results for the first time demonstrate that osmium is taken up, partitioned, and accumulated in mammal tissue, and indicate that high kidney-to-body weight ratios might be induced by anthropogenic osmium.

  • 63.
    Sandström, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Political Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ring, Irene
    International Institute Zittau, Technische Universität Dresden, Zittau, Germany.
    Olschewski, Roland
    Economics and Social Sciences Research Unit, WSL Swiss Federal Research Institute, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Simoncini, Riccardo
    Sustainable Use and Management of Ecosystems, Commission on Ecosystem Management, International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Gland, Switzerland.
    Albert, Christian
    Institute of Geography, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
    Acar, Sevil
    Center for Climate Change and Policy Studies, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Adeishvili, Malkhaz
    Independent Environmental Policy Expert, Tbilisi, Georgia.
    Allard, Christina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Anker, Yakov
    Department of Chemical Engineering and the Eastern R&D Center, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel.
    Arlettaz, Raphaël
    Division of Conservation Biology, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Bela, Györgyi
    IDEAS Science Ltd., Budapest, Hungary.
    Coscieme, Luca
    Hot or Cool Institute, Berlin, Germany.
    Fischer, Anke
    Department of Urban and Rural Development, Division of Environmental Communication, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fürst, Christine
    Institute for Geosciences and Geography, Department of Sustainable Landscape Development, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Germany.
    Galil, Bella
    Steinhardt Museum of Natural History, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Hynes, Stephen
    Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU), University of Galway, Galway, Ireland.
    Kasymov, Ulan
    International Institute Zittau, Technische Universität Dresden, Zittau, Germany.
    Marta-Pedroso, Cristina
    MARETEC - Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Mendes, Ana
    MED – Mediterranean Institute for Agriculture, Environment and Development & CHANGE – Global Change and Sustainability Institute, Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada, Laboratório de Ornitologia, University of Évora, Évora, Portugal.
    Molau, Ulf
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pergl, Jan
    Department of Invasion Ecology, Institute of Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Průhonice, Czech Republic.
    Mainstreaming biodiversity and nature's contributions to people in Europe and Central Asia: insights from IPBES to inform the CBD post-2020 agenda2023In: Ecosystems and People, ISSN 2639-5908, E-ISSN 2639-5916, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 2138553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent global and regional assessments of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) show that Nature&apos;s Contributions to People (NCP) are under an alarming threat due to the continuing loss of biodiversity. These assessments call for increasing conservation efforts and a more sustainable use of biodiversity to enhance the chances of halting biodiversity loss and reversing current trends. One of the strategies to achieve change is to mainstream biodiversity into sectoral policies. Mainstreaming, a concept that can be traced back to the Brundtland report, promotes the integration of the environment into political, societal, and economic planning and decision-making. Based on the review of key studies undertaken during the regional assessment for Europe and Central Asia, we develop a stepwise approach to analyze the current status of mainstreaming of biodiversity and NCP. The approach can be used both for policy design purposes and diagnostic evaluations. It demonstrates that mainstreaming has the potential to improve the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity as well as the sustained provision of NCP. However, based on the status of implementation across Europe and Central Asia, we conclude that mainstreaming needs to be pursued and implemented in a stronger and more systematic way. The results of our assessment provide important input to national strategies and policies but also to the ongoing process of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity while developing the post-2020 global biodiversity framework.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 64.
    Sequeira, João G. N.
    et al.
    BioISI-Biosystems & Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Campo Grande, C8 bdg, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal.
    Nobre, Tânia
    MED-Mediterranean Institute for Agriculture, Environment and Development, Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada, Universidade de Évora, Pólo da Mitra, Ap. 94, 7006-554 Evora, Portugal.
    Duarte, Sónia
    Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal; LEAF-Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal.
    Jones, Dennis
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering. Department of Wood Processing and Biomaterials, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 1176, Praha 6-Suchdol, 16521 Prague, Czech Republic.
    Esteves, Bruno
    Department of Wood Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Viseu, Av. Cor. José Maria Vale de Andrade, 3504-510 Viseu, Portugal; Centre for Natural Resources, Environment and Society-CERNAS-IPV Research Centre, Av. Cor. José Maria Vale de Andrade, 3504-510 Viseu, Portugal.
    Nunes, Lina
    Structures Department, National Laboratory for Civil Engineering, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700-066 Lisbon, Portugal; cE3c, Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Azorean Biodiversity Group, University of Azores, 9700-042 Angra do Heroísmo, Portugal.
    Proof-of-Principle That Cellular Automata Can Be Used to Predict Infestation Risk by Reticulitermes grassei (Blattodea: Isoptera)2022In: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past few decades, species distribution modelling has been increasingly used to monitor invasive species. Studies herein propose to use Cellular Automata (CA), not only to model the distribution of a potentially invasive species but also to infer the potential of the method in risk prediction of Reticulitermes grassei infestation. The test area was mainland Portugal, for which an available presence-only dataset was used. This is a typical dataset type, resulting from either distribution studies or infestation reports. Subterranean termite urban distributions in Portugal from 1970 to 2001 were simulated, and the results were compared with known records from both 2001 (the publication date of the distribution models for R. grassei in Portugal) and 2020. The reported model was able to predict the widespread presence of R. grassei, showing its potential as a viable prediction tool for R. grassei infestation risk in wooden structures, providing the collection of appropriate variables. Such a robust simulation tool can prove to be highly valuable in the decision-making process concerning pest management.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 65.
    Shinde, S. P.
    et al.
    Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Dr. A.S. College of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, MPKV, Rahuri, Maharashtra, India.
    Barai, V. N.
    Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Dr. A.S. College of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, MPKV, Rahuri, Maharashtra, India.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Gavit, B. K.
    Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Dr. A.S. College of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, MPKV, Rahuri, Maharashtra, India.
    Kadam, S. A.
    Center for Advanced Agriculture Science and Technology on Climate-Smart Agriculture and Water Management, MPKV, Rahuri, Maharashtra, India.
    Atre, A. A.
    Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Dr. A.S. College of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, MPKV, Rahuri, Maharashtra, India.
    Bansod, R. D.
    Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Dr. A.S. College of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, MPKV, Rahuri, Maharashtra, India.
    Elbeltagi, Ahmed
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Mansoura University, Mansoura, 35516, Egypt.
    Characterization of basaltic rock aquifer parameters using hydraulic parameters, Theis’s method and aquifer test software in the hard rock area of Buchakewadi watershed Maharashtra, India2022In: Applied water science, ISSN 2190-5487, E-ISSN 2190-5495, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The twelve wells were selected to carry out the various test, duration of pumping (min), maximum draw drown (m), duration of recovery (min), residual drawdown, and aquifer type in the basaltic rock aquifer parameters of Buchakewadi watershed. The source and flow of groundwater are essential concerns in hydrological systems that concern both spatially and temporally components of groundwater discharge and water supply problems. The content and temperature of groundwater flowing through an aquifer might change depending on the aquifer environment. As a result, hydrodynamic analyses can provide valuable information about a region’s subsurface geology. The present research attempts of aquifer variables such as transmissivity (T) and storativity (S) estimation are significant for groundwater resource development and evaluation. There are numerous approaches for calculating precise aquifer characteristics (i.e., hydrograph analysis, pumping test, etc.). A most frequent in situ analysis is a well-pumping test, which accurately measures the decline and rise of groundwater levels. During an aquifer pumping test, to characterize aquifer properties in an undiscovered location to forecast the rate of depletion of the groundwater table/potentiometric surface. The shallow, weathering subsurface water accessible above the Deccan traps in an unconfined state is insufficient to satisfy the ever-increasing pressure on water supplies. Maharashtra is similarly dominated by hard rocks, whose rainfall susceptibility is limited by weathering and primary porosity, as is their volume to store and convey water. Based on the hydraulic parameters and Theis method, results are optimized. Aquifer mapping and pumping test results can be more important for solving problems such as water scarcity, nonpolluting water, health issues, and source of fresh water on the earth surface. However, the characterization of aquifer parameters should be significant role in the scientific planning and engineering practices. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 66.
    Sjöstedt, Lovisa M.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    CFD Modelling as a Tool to Better Understand Fish Behavior2023In: Proceedings of the 40th IAHR World Congress - 2023: Rivers - Connecting Mountains and Coasts / [ed] Helmut Habersack; Michael Tritthart; Lisa Waldenberger, International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR) , 2023, p. 2665-2672Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Wahl, Frauke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Plant community structure, strategies, niche relations and species guilds within rising sea-shores on the north-western site of the Bothnian bay1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Växtsamhällen på stränder av landhöjningskusten i norra Bottenviken, som representerar lokaler med primärsuccession, undersöktes på sin struktur. Grimes triangelmodell för växtstrategier under successionen, liksom teorier om en vid nischbredd av tidiga successionsarter och av reducerad nischöverlappning bland växtarter som tillhör samma släkte testades. Dessutom söktes efter växtegenskaper i litteraturen, för att gruppera arterna i olika guilds. Guilds användes för att illustrera successionsprocessen.Vegetationen i tio transekter placerade på olika strandtyper studerades från några centimeter under medelvattenståndet till flera meter in i busk- och trädzonen. Växternas täckningsgrad (%) värderades, växternas höjd mättes och 16 miljövariabler undersöktes.Genom att analysera värdena med Canonical Correspondence Analysis var det möjligt att visa skillnader och likheter mellan transekterna baserade på växtarternas täckningsgrad. Höjd över havet visade sig att ha den största betydelsen för växternas fördelning när miljöfaktorerna inkluderades i ordinationen. Korrelationsanalys visade att höjden över havet var signifikant korrelerad med flera andra undersökta miljöfaktorerna.Grimes modell gällde inte för denna typ av samhälle. Tidiga successionsstadier karakteriserades inte av en hög förekomst av kortlevande växter. En klassifikation baserad på stress, produktivitet och störningar verkar vara otillräcklig för att förklara successionsförloppet och växternas realiserade nischer. Reducerad nischöverlappning av växter som tillhör samma släkte kunde inte påvisas. Tvärtom, i de tre fall där signifikanta skillnader upptäcktes hade växter som tillhör samma släkte en större överlappning mellan varandra i jämförelse med referensarter. Nischbredden var inte större för tidiga successionsarter i jämförelse med sena arter. Arternas responsbredd var större för markfaktorer än för höjden över medelvattenytan.Nästan inga kortlivade arter hittades. Olika former och intensitet av störningar förorsakar kanske ett lågt fortbestånd av dessa arter genom att hindra en lyckosam reproduktion. Tidiga och sena successionsarter skilde sig beträffande rotsystemet, pollinationssättet, bladens livslängd och växtformen (graminoid, örtartad). Detta indikerar att det är inte bara växtarterna som ändrar sig under successionsförloppet utan även växtstrategier. Det tidiga successionsstadiet karakteriserades av rhizomatous-graminoid guild, det sena stadiet av summergreen-forb guild.

  • 68.
    Wijayarathna, E.R. Kanishka B.
    et al.
    Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, Borås SE-501 90, Sweden.
    Mohammadkhani, Ghasem
    Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, Borås SE-501 90, Sweden.
    Soufiani, Amir M.
    Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, Borås SE-501 90, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Karin H.
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-100 44, Sweden.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, Borås SE-501 90, Sweden.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-100 44, Sweden.
    Berglund, Linn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Heinmaa, Ivo
    National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, Tallinn 12618, Estonia.
    Root, Andrew
    Magsol, Tuhkanummenkuja 2, Helsinki 00970, Finland.
    Zamani, Akram
    Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, Borås SE-501 90, Sweden.
    Fungal textile alternatives from bread waste with leather-like properties2022In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 179, article id 106041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food waste and fashion pollution are two of the most prominent global environmental issues. To alleviate the problems associated with food waste, while simultaneously contributing to sustainable fashion, the feasibility of making an alternative textile material with leather-like properties from fungal biomass cultivated on bread waste was investigated. The filamentous fungus, Rhizopus delemar, was successfully grown on waste bread in a submerged cultivation process, and fungal biomass was treated with vegetable tannin of chestnut wood. NMR and FTIR confirmed interactions between tannin and fungal biomass, while OM, SEM and AFM visualised the changes in the hyphae upon the tannin treatment. Thermal stability was assessed using TGA analysis. The wet-laid technique commonly utilised for paper-making was used to prepare sheets of hyphae. Some of the sheets were treated with glycerol and/or a biobased binder as post-treatment. Overall, three of the produced materials exhibited leather-like properties comparable to that of natural leather. Sheets from untreated biomass with only glycerol post-treatment showed a tensile strength of 7.7 MPa and an elongation at break of 5%. Whereas sheets from untreated biomass and tannin treated biomass with both glycerol and binder treatments led to tensile strengths of 7.1 MPa and 6.9 MPa, and the elongation at break of 12% and 17%, respectively. The enhancement of hydrophobicity after the binder treatment, helped to preserve the absorbed glycerol within the sheet and thereby the flexibility was retained when in contact with moisture. These findings demonstrate that bread waste-derived fungal sheets have great potential as environmentally friendly materials with leather-like properties.

  • 69.
    Zerouali, Bilel
    et al.
    Vegetal Chemistry-Water-Energy Laboratory, Department of Hydraulic, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Chlef, Hassiba Benbouali, B.P. 78C, 02180, Ouled Fares, Chlef, Algeria.
    Elbeltagi, Ahmed
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Mansoura University, Mansoura, 35516, Egypt.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Abda, Zaki
    Research Laboratory of Water Resources, Soil and Environment, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Amar Telidji University, P.O. Box 37.G, 03000, Laghouat, Algeria.
    Chettih, Mohamed
    Research Laboratory of Water Resources, Soil and Environment, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Amar Telidji University, P.O. Box 37.G, 03000, Laghouat, Algeria.
    Santos, Celso Augusto Guimarães
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba, 58051-900, Brazil.
    Boukhari, Sofiane
    Department of Civil Engineering, Mohamed Cherif Messaadia University of Souk-Ahras, Souk-Ahras, Algeria.
    Araibia, Ahmed Salah
    Department of Civil Engineering, Mohamed Cherif Messaadia University of Souk-Ahras, Souk-Ahras, Algeria.
    Improving the visualization of rainfall trends using various innovative trend methodologies with time–frequency-based methods2022In: Applied water science, ISSN 2190-5487, E-ISSN 2190-5495, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the Innovative Trend Methodology (ITM) and their inspired approaches, i.e., Double (D-ITM) and Triple (T-ITM), were combined with Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) time frequency-based method. The new hybrid methods (i.e., ITM-HHT, D-ITM-HHT, and T-ITM-HHT) were proposed and compared to the DWT-based methods in order to recommend the best method. Three total annual rainfall time series from 1920 to 2011 were selected from three hydrological basins in Northern Algeria. The new combined models (ITM-HHT, D-ITM-HHT, and T-ITM-HHT) revealed that the 1950–1975 period has significant wet episodes followed by a long-term drought observed in the western region of Northern Algeria, while Northeastern Algeria presented a wet period since 2001. The proposed approaches successfully detected, in a visible manner, hidden trends presented in the signals, which proves that the removal of some modes of variability from the original rainfall signals can increase the accuracy of the used approaches. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 70.
    Öborn, Lisa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Österlund, Heléne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Svedin, Jonathan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nordqvist, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Litter in Urban Areas May Contribute to Microplastics Pollution: Laboratory Study of the Photodegradation of Four Commonly Discarded Plastics2022In: Journal of environmental engineering, ISSN 0733-9372, E-ISSN 1943-7870, Vol. 148, no 11, article id 06022004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plastic litter in the urban environment has been identified as a source of microplastics and stormwater a pathway for its transportation to freshwater and marine environments. However, few studies exist on the potential for litter to contribute to microplastics in a land-based system. This laboratory-based study involves simulation of the weathering of four polymers [low-density polyethylene (PE-LD), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET)] in a land-based environment using accelerated photodegradation with three exposure times. Microplastics generated were quantified with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and identified using a spectra reference library. The results showed differences in release patterns and number of particles produced. For LD-PE, no clear pattern of UV-degradation was demonstrated, because the number of particles released from exposed and unexposed (control) samples was in the same order of magnitude. PS and PET showed similar patterns, where the number of particles released increased with exposure duration. The numbers of particles detected were, on average, 1, 8, and 31  particles/cm2 for PS and 3, 3, and 16  particles/cm2 for PET for exposures of seven, 28, and 56 days, respectively. PP produced the largest number of particles after 28 days exposure (ca. 58  particles/cm2) which then decreased after 56 days (ca. 21  particles/cm2). It was hypothesized that the number of particles increased with exposure time and that the generated particles then further fragmented into pieces of undetectable particle size (<10  μm). 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 71.
    Öhlander, Björn
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Forsberg, Jerry
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Växjö Energi AB, Box 497, SE-351 06, Växjö, Sweden.
    Österlund, Heléne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, SE-977 75 Luleå, Sweden.
    Ingri, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ecke, Frauke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Alakangas, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Fractionation of trace metals in a contaminated freshwater stream using membrane filtration, ultrafiltration, DGT and transplanted aquatic moss2012In: Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis, ISSN 1467-7873, E-ISSN 2041-4943, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 303-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four metal speciation and fractionation techniques – DGT (diffusive gradients in thin films), 1-kDa ultrafiltration, 0.22-µm membrane filtration and aquatic moss – were simultaneously applied to a small, contaminated freshwater stream in northern Sweden to investigate differences and similarities between the methods regarding trace metal speciation and their dependence on geochemical water properties. The investigated metals comprise Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The normal DGT devices with Chelex cation exchanger were used. Shoots from the aquatic moss Fontinalis antipyretica L ex Hedw. were collected in a non-polluted brook and transplanted to the sampling site for exposure. It was evident that 0.22-µm membrane filtration, 1-kDa ultrafiltration and DGT generally measured different metal fractions where <1-kDa ultrafiltered concentrations were lower than DGT labile concentrations which in turn were lower than <0.22-µm concentrations. The differences between DGT and <1-kDa concentrations indicate the occurrence of labile colloids discriminated by ultrafiltration. Strong correlations between DGT and <1 kDa concentrations were found for Al, Cu, Cd, Co and Zn. Despite a rigorous sample cleaning, retention of particulate matter on the moss samples was revealed by a significant correlation between metal concentrations in moss and particulate Fe. Generally, elevated trace metal concentrations were found in moss exposed at the sampling site compared to reference moss from the non-polluted brook. No significant correlations were found between DGT-labile concentrations and moss concentrations.

12 51 - 71 of 71
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf