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  • 51.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Let’s have a “school-rules-attitude”2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences. , 2015, p. 309-311Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Listen to me when I have something to say: students paricipation in research for sustainable school improvement2009In: Improving Schools, ISSN 1365-4802, E-ISSN 1475-7583, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 249-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on student participation in the research process as a contribution to school improvement. The specific aim of this article was to explore students' participation in different phases of a research process and discuss how their participation can contribute to school improvement. Based on a life-world phenomenological ontology, we used two research and development projects - Full of Value and Arctic Children - to shed light on participation in research. When doing research together with students, we have been inspired by Participatory Appreciative Action Research (PAAR). The methods used in the projects were open writing, group reflection, drawings, and exhibition discussions. This research showed that students were able to explore and express their lived experiences of behaviour and well-being in school, and how this was linked to positive change. We found students trustworthy, capable, and competent, enriching the process of school improvement.

  • 53.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Researcher’s role: possibilities and challenges when giving voice to students’ experiences2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Student visual narratives giving voice to positive learning experiences: a contribution to educational change2012In: Academic Leadership, ISSN 1533-7812, E-ISSN 1533-7812, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore students’ positive experiences of their learning through the use of visual narratives, observation, and field notes in two secondary school classes in Sweden. Four themes were found: (1) knowing the needs of mind and body, (2) embracing each other in mutual support, (3) learning in a facilitating environment, and (4) using a variety of learning modalities. Students wished to have a voice in setting the curriculum, favored a variety of assignments, and sought to expand their learning environment beyond the classroom. Finally, challenges for teachers and school leaders are discussed.

  • 55.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Students’ Experiences of Meaningful Situations in School2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 538-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on school situations students experienced as meaningful and how these experiences can guide educational improvement. Participants included 15 students in grade 3 from a Swedish school. In this qualitative study, the data consisted of drawings, multimodal productions, interviews, and field notes. The analysis resulted in four themes: Having the opportunity to learn in different spaces; Being free and able to participate; Experiencing caring and sharing, and Recognizing one’s own growth and achievement. The findings suggest that situations students find meaningful involve aspects of both learning and wellbeing. The practical implication for these results is that student-generated qualitative data can help indicate needs for educational improvement.

  • 56.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    ’Tact of researching’: the ethically aware researcher giving voice to students in a Swedish context2011In: The Student Voice Handbook: Bridging the Academic/Practitioner Divide, Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011, p. 399-408Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    The cup is half full: appreciating the positive present in research and in practical work in school2008In: ECER 2008 Gothenburg: The European Conference on Educational Research in Gothenburg, Sweden, 8 - 9 September 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop we will present the background and the development of Participatory Appreciative Action Research (PAAR) as a research methodology and a school improvement process as well. This method has its roots in participatory action research which emphasizes the improvement of practice through involvement and participation. The new addition in PAAR is the appreciative aspect, this means for example working together and sharing the best practices and appreciating each other and our abilities. PAAR can be viewed as the opposite of problem-solving because it focuses on success and what works well instead of problems. Key concepts in PAAR are re-framing, positive questions, participation and positive present. These concepts will be discussed and explored. PAAR offers an opportunity to take positive questions and turn them into positive actions. This can be compared to Antonovsky's way of looking at health and development driven by the positive, in other words what is healthy not what is ill. This perspective can also be used when building an educational setting that encourages co-operation and sharing which make possible a positive psychosocial culture enhancing the learning process.We will give examples of how we as researchers have applied PAAR to our own research areas that include ethical perspectives on learning and health promotion with children in compulsory school in Sweden. Finally we raise questions of how educational research and school improvement relate to each other and if, in what way and when they can cooperate in building not only a better school but a better future.Methodology or methods/research instruments or sources used:We will focus on how to use PAAR methodology in the field of school improvement generally and specifically pertaining to educational research and health promotion, through giving the theoretical background and examples of how we have applied PAAR in our own research with students in compulsory school.Conclusions or expected outcomes or findings: This hour-long workshop seeks to introduce and explore PAAR as a method in educational research and in school improvement processes. After giving the background of PAAR, the participants in the workshop will have the opportunity to begin to explore how PAAR can be used in their own research and/or practice. This is done through interactive activities. We will present how we have used PAAR in our research and hope that this will inspire the participants to reflect on their own research and practice. We also want to address the issue of the relationship between research and improvement of a practice.

  • 58.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Uppskattningens kraft: lärande, etik och hälsa2011Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 59.
    Bergstrom-Wuolo, Maya
    et al.
    Public Health Center, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Dahlström, Josefin
    Health Counselor in Luleå.
    Hertting, Krister
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    My heart has no hurt: the health of young immigrants2018In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 290-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore health from the perspective of young immigrants in Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A total of 25 newly arrived young immigrants attending Swedish language classes in northern Sweden participated by drawing and writing open letters. They continued the open-ended sentence “Now I’ll draw and describe a day when I was feeling good, that was […].”

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in three themes: longing to be in control for a better life, searching for power in the good and the bad, and striving for a sense of belonging in the new society. The findings illuminate young immigrants’ perspectives of a health-promoting everyday life consisting of agency, reflection and a sense of community. The findings also highlight the young immigrants’ experiences when health-promoting aspects are lacking, characterized by disillusionment, anxiety and loneliness. The findings are discussed with health promotion, health literacy and young immigrants in mind.

    Practical implications

    According to young immigrants, meeting basic needs such as food, sleep and housing is health promoting but easily taken for granted. Being able to have a say in matters concerning everyday life, social inclusion and finding power in memories – positive and negative – can promote health in young immigrants.

    Originality/value

    The young immigrants were able to communicate via drawings and words to overcome language barriers.

  • 60.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Agosti, Reto
    Headache Center Hirslanden, Zurich.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Battaglia, Hugo
    SUVA, Luzern.
    Gerber, Christian
    University of Zürich, Department of Orthopedics.
    Procedure after minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in ice hockey to prevent neurological sequele2004In: Safety in ice hockey, fourth volume: [papers presented at the Fourth Symposium on Ice Hockey held 5 - 6 May 2002 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania] / [ed] David J. Pearsall; Alan B. Ashare, West Conshohocken, Pa: ASTM International, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Agosti, Reto
    Headache Center Hirslanden, Zurich.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Battaglia, Hugo
    SUVA, Luzern.
    Gerber, Christian
    University of Zürich, Department of Orthopedics.
    Procedures after minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in ice hockey to prevent neurological sequelae2001In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 367-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma Surgery.
    Lorentzon, Ronny
    Umeå University, Department of Musculoskeletal Research.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Montag, Wolf-Dieter
    Injury report system2000In: Safety in ice hockey: third volume / [ed] Alan B. Ashare, West Conshohocken, Pa: ASTM International, 2000, p. 44-62Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma Surgery.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    International sports injury system: ISIS2001In: Sports medicine & hockey: a summit for the NHL and beyond, AOSSM , 2001, p. 15-36Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Clinic of Orthopedic Surgery, Trauma Surgery, and Sports Medicine, Department of Surgery.
    Wirth, Stephan
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Head injuries and facial injuries in ice hockey: role of the protective equipment2005In: European Journal of Trauma, ISSN 1439-0590, E-ISSN 1615-3146, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 369-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose: Despite a decreasing tendency of head and facial injuries in ice hockey the number of these injuries still seems to be too high. The purpose of this prospective investigation was to study the mechanism of facial and eye injuries as well as the role of protective equipment and revised rules. Methods: A prospective epidemiologic analysis of ice hockey-related injuries in the two highest-ranking Swiss Ice Hockey Leagues-League A (NLA) and B (NLB)-was performed by the Swiss Medical Committee during the two seasons 1996 and 1997. Results: A total of 392 injuries occurred during games or practice. Head injuries and facial injuries made up 26% of these injuries. Most of these injuries were classified as minor injuries. All eye injuries occurred in players either not wearing visors at all or wearing the visor incorrectly. Most injuries were caused by the illegal use of sticks. Conclusion: Most head injuries and facial injuries could be prevented by wearing helmet and visor correctly and by playing the game according to the rules

  • 65.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma Surgery.
    Wirth, Stephan
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    The avoidability of head and neck injuries in ice hockey: an historical review2002In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 410-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI), cerebral concussions, is increasing and cannot be eliminated by any kind of equipment. Prevention strategies, such as the introduction of "checking from behind" rules have become effective in decreasing the number of severe spinal injuries. A new "head checking" rule should reduce mTBI in the same way in the following years. Mouthguards should be mandatory as an effective device for the prevention of dental and orofacial injuries, as well as reducing the incidence and severity of mTBI. A new internet database system, the International Sports Injury System (ISIS) should improve epidemiological analysis of head, face, and spinal injuries worldwide.ISIS should provide an internationally compatible system for continuous monitoring of risk factors, protective effects of equipment, and protective effects of equipment and effects of changes in rules through the years.

  • 66.
    Björklund, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Utvärdering och analys av LTUs kursutvärderingsmodell med tillhörande IT-stöd2008Report (Other academic)
  • 67. Blomberg, Stina
    et al.
    Degerman, Ellinor
    "Allt hänger ihop skulle jag vilja påstå": En kvalitativ studie om universitetsstudenters upplevelse av sambandet mellan regelbunden fysisk träning, sinnesstämning och studiemotivation2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how students at the University experienced the relationship between regular physical exercise, mental mood and motivation to study. A qualitative method which consisted of individual interviews were conducted to gather the data. Seven physically active participants were asked to answer questions from an health promoting interview guide. The data were then analyzed with a qualitative content analysis, where four categories could be distinguished; a healthy balance in life, belief in their own ability, effects of exercise and a break in their studies. The results showed that participants experienced a clear link between physical exercise, motivation to study and mental mood, which they explained as a circle where all parts interacted positively. Exercise could affect the mood which in turn increased their motivation to study and when the participants felt satisfied with themselves for having performed in their studies, they were also motivated to exercise again. It turned out for the participants in the study that the possibility of a break with physical exercise in their studies were necessary to live a balanced and healthy life.

  • 68.
    Bradley, Jonathan P.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Warwick University, Coventry.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Antzutkin, Oleg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Brown, Steven P.
    Department of Physics, Warwick University, Coventry.
    Probing intermolecular crystal packing in gamma-indomethacin by high-resolution 1H solid-state NMR spectroscopy2011In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 3463-3471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An NMR crystallography approach that combines experimental solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR with calculation is applied to the gamma polymorph of the pharmaceutical molecule, indomethacin. First-principles calculations (GIPAW) for the full crystal structure and an isolated molecule show changes in the (1)H chemical shift for specific aliphatic and aromatic protons of over -1 ppm that are due to intermolecular CH-pi interactions. For the OH proton, (1)H double-quantum (DQ) CRAMPS (combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy) spectra reveal intermolecular H-H proximities to the OH proton of the carboxylic acid dimer as well as to specific aromatic CH protons. The enhanced resolution in (1)H DQ-(13)C spectra, recorded at 850 MHz, enables separate (1)H DQ build-up curves (as a function of the DQ recoupling time) to be extracted for the aromatic CH protons. Supported by eight-spin density-matrix simulations, it is shown how the relative maximum intensities and rates of build-up provide quantitative insight into intramolecular and intermolecular H-H proximities that characterize the crystal packing

  • 69. Brattberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    National Institute of Public Health.
    Socialtjänstens roll i det förebyggande folkhälsoarbetet1997Report (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Briggs, Karen K.
    et al.
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Winternet.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Rodkey, William G.
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    Steadman, J. Richard
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    25 years later: the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale for anterior cruciate ligament injury of tne knee2008In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S34-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Burman, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Linköping University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports and Ttrauma Research Group, Winternet, Bodens sjukhus, Ortopedkliniken, Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken, Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Department of Orthopaedics, Sunderby Hospital.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal.
    Malm, Christer
    Umeå University, Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Winternet, Department of Sports Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Concussed athletes are more prone to injury both before and after their index concussion: data base analysis of 699 concussed contact sports athletes2016In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 2, no 1, article id e000092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Ice hockey and football players suffering concussions might have an increased risk for injuries afterwards. We aimed to investigate if concussions predisposed athletes for subsequent sport injuries. Methods Patient data were obtained from a data base established at the University Hospital in Umea, Sweden. Athletes who had suffered a concussion were included if they had been aged between 15 and 35 years of age, and played ice hockey, football (soccer), floorball and handball. They were studied in terms of all new or previous injuries during 24 months before and after their concussion. Results were compared with a control group of athletes from the same four sports with an ankle injury. Results Athletes with a concussion were more likely to sustain injuries compared with the control group, both before (OR 1.98. 95% CI 1.45 to 2.72) and after the concussion (OR 1.72. 95% CI 1.26 to 2.37). No increase in frequency of injury was found after a concussion compared with before. This was true for athletes in all four sports and for both sexes. Conclusions This study indicates that athletes sustaining a concussion may have a more aggressive or risk-taking style of play than their counterparts. Our data do not suggest that a concussion injury, per se, leads to subsequent injuries.

  • 72.
    Bykachev, Kirsi
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Tossavainen, Kerttu
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kumpulainen, Kirsti
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Wilson, Philip
    University of Aberdeen.
    Bjørvig, Siri
    University Hospital of North Norway.
    Borgen, Morten
    University Hospital of North Norway.
    Multi-professional collaboration and consultation: Improving child and adolescent psychiatry with eHealth2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Bykachev, Kirsi
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Tossavainen, Kerttu
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kumpulainen, Kirsti
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Wilson, Philip
    University of Aberdeen.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Bjørvig, Siri
    University Hospital of North Norway.
    Borgen, Morten
    University Hospital of North Norway.
    Improving psychiatry services for children and adolescents with eHealth in peripheral areas2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Byström, Marianne
    et al.
    Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life.
    Landström, Ulf
    Statshälsan/Prevab, Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Swedish Dairy Association.
    Kännedom, attityd och levnadsmönster bland högskolestuderande angående kost, motion och trötthet2003Report (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Byström, Marianne
    et al.
    Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå university, National Institute for Working Life.
    Landström, Ulf
    Statshälsan/Prevab, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Swedish Dairy Association.
    Måltidens inverkan på vakenhet och prestation2002Report (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Carson, JD
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Women's College Hospital Sport Centre for Advanced Research and Education.
    Tator, CH
    Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery.
    Provvidenza, CF
    ThinkFirst-SportSmart Sports and Recreational Injuries Research and Prevention Centre, Toronto.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    LaPrade, RF
    University of Minnesota, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.
    Biasca, Nicola
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Mueller, FO
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Mölsä, Jouko
    LIKES Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences, Jyväskylä.
    Cushman, RA
    Prevention of spinal injuries in ice hockey players: an international perspective2004In: Rendez-Vous 2004: Sport medicine symposium, Vancouver, Canada, March 15-17 2004, 2004, p. 380-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Catalan-Figueroa, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. Department of Biochemistry, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. Centro de Nanotecnología Aplicada, Universidad Mayor, Santiago, Chile.
    Boisset, Constanza B
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Jara, Miguel O
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Flores, Mario E
    Instituto de Ciencias Químicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.
    Moreno-Villoslada, Ignacio
    Instituto de Ciencias Químicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.
    Fiedler, Jenny L
    Centro de Nanotecnología Aplicada, Universidad Mayor, Santiago, Chile.
    Morales, Javier O.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science. Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Santiago, Chile.
    A mechanistic approach for the optimization of loperamide loaded nanocarriers characterization: Diafiltration and mathematical modeling advantages2018In: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, ISSN 0928-0987, E-ISSN 1879-0720, Vol. 125, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral bioavailability of loperamide is restricted by its limited absorption in the gastrointestinal tract due to its poor aqueous solubility and its P-glycoprotein (Pgp) substrate characteristic. In addition, ammonium methacrylate copolymers have shown to have mucoadhesive properties, whereas poloxamer 188, has been suggested as a Pgp inhibitor. Thus, in this work, we evaluate conditions that affect physicochemical parameters of ammonium methacrylate/poloxamer 188-based nanocarriers loaded with loperamide hydrochloride. Nanocarriers were synthesized by nanoprecipitation, enhancing loperamide encapsulation efficiency by modifying the aqueous phase to basic pH. The isolation of the non-encapsulated drug fraction from the nanocarriers-incorporated fraction was conducted by centrifugation, ultrafiltration, vacuum filtration and diafiltration. The last method was effective in providing a deeper understanding of drug-nanocarrier loading and interactions by means of modeling the data obtained by it. Through diafiltration, it was determined an encapsulation efficiency of about 93%, from which a 38% ±6 was shown to be reversibly (thermodynamic interaction) and a 62% ±6 irreversibly (kinetic interaction) bound. Finally, release profiles were assessed through empirical and semi-empirical modeling, showing a biphasic release behavior (burst effect 11.34% and total release at 6 h = 33% ±1). Thus, encapsulation efficiency and release profile were shown to have a strong mathematical modeling-based correlation, providing the mechanistic approach presented in this article a solid support for future translational investigations.

  • 78.
    Catalan-Figueroa, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Palma-Florez, Sujey
    Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Santiago.
    Alvarez, Gonzalo
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Fritz, Hans F.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Jara, Miguel O.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
    Morales, Javier O.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, 8380494, Santiago.
    Nanomedicine and nanotoxicology: The pros and cons for neurodegeneration and brain cancer2016In: Nanomedicine, ISSN 1743-5889, E-ISSN 1748-6963, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 171-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current strategies for brain diseases are mostly symptomatic and noncurative. Nanotechnology has the potential to facilitate the transport of drugs across the blood-brain barrier and to enhance their pharmacokinetic profile. However, to reach clinical application, an understanding of nanoneurotoxicity in terms of oxidative stress and inflammation is required. Emerging evidence has also shown that nanoparticles have the ability to alter autophagy, which can induce inflammation and oxidative stress, or vice versa. These effects may increase neurodegenerative processes damage, but on the other hand, they may have benefits for brain cancer therapies. In this review, we emphasize how nanomaterials may induce neurotoxic effects focusing on neurodegeneration, and how these effects could be exploited toward brain cancer treatment

  • 79.
    Chakraborty, Subhashis
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Shukla, Dali
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Rao Vuddanda, Parameswara
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Mishra, Brahmeshwar
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Singh, Sanjay Kumar
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Effective in-vivo utilization of lipid-based nanoparticles as drug carrier for carvedilol phosphate2011In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (JPP), ISSN 0022-3573, E-ISSN 2042-7158, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 774-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Lipid nanoparticles as carrier for oral drug administration improve gastrointestinal solubility of poorly soluble drugs and thus enhance bioavailability. However, basic drugs may undergo rapid dissolution from such solid dispersions in the stomach and precipitate in the intestine due to their higher solubility in acidic medium. Therefore, the objective of this work was to study the enhancement in bioavailability of carvedilol phosphate (basic drug) by providing an alkaline gastric environment to drug-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles. Methods An alkaline gastric environment in rats was created and maintained with oral administration of an antacid suspension 5 min before and 30 min post dosing. Key findings The formulation administered orally exhibited enhanced bioavailability (∼27%) when compared with drug suspension and sustained release behaviour when compared with formulation under ideal gastric conditions. The enhanced bioavailability is due to the presence of lipid nanoparticles as drug carrier while the sustained-release characteristic may be attributed to the presence of antacid, which resulted in elevation of gastric pH and reduced the drug's solubility. Conclusions It may be concluded that although lipid nanoparticles can be instrumental in improving bioavailability, additional sustained release may be achieved by targeting intestinal release of basic drugs from lipid vehicles, which is possible by incorporating them into suitable enteric-coated formulations.

  • 80.
    Chakraborty, Subhashis
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Shukla, Dali
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Rao Vuddanda, Parameswara
    epartment of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Mishra, Brahmeshwar
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi .
    Singh, Sanjay Kumar
    Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
    Utilization of adsorption technique in the development of oral delivery system of lipid based nanoparticles2010In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 81, no 2, p. 563-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the present study was to employ suitable adsorbent with free flowing characteristics for improving the stability and physical properties of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) for oral administration. Stearic acid based nanoparticles of carvedilol phosphate were fabricated by solvent emulsification evaporation technique in sodium taurocholate solution prepared in pH 7.2 buffers (I-KH2PO4/NaOH or II-NaH2PO4/Na2HPO4) with 1% polyvinyl alcohol. Nanoparticles were then adsorbed by passing the nanodispersion through a Neusilin US2 (adsorbent) column. Interestingly, scanning electron microscopy revealed round deformed and even collapsed nanoparticles in Buffer-I and discrete spherical to ellipsoidal nanoparticles in Buffer-II which indicates the inability of nanoemulsion to crystallize and form SLN in Buffer-I. The successful formation of SLN in Buffer-II was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The retention of SLN from the nanodispersion by adsorption on the adsorbent imparted good flow property and resulted in a marked stability improvement of the formulation in terms of drug retention efficiency and release profile as compared to the simple nanosuspension. In conclusion, the adsorbent technology would be instrumental in imparting additional features to the existing conventional colloidal system for pharmaceutical application which would ease the process of capsule filling at industrial scale, simplify the handling of formulations by patients and can significantly improve the shelf life of the product for a longer period of time as compared to liquid formulations

  • 81.
    Chattoraj, Sayantan
    et al.
    Pharmaceutical Materials Science & Engineering Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota.
    Shi, Limin
    Pharmaceutical Materials Science & Engineering Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota.
    Chen, Miles
    Pharmaceutical Materials Science & Engineering Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota.
    Alhalaweh, Amjad
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sun, Changquan Calvin
    Pharmaceutical Materials Science & Engineering Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota.
    Origin of Deteriorated Crystal Plasticity and Compaction Properties of a 1:1 Cocrystal between Piroxicam and Saccharin2014In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 3864-3874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 1:1 cocrystal between piroxicam and saccharin exhibits significantly deteriorated powder compaction properties compared to both coformers. The molecular origin of this effect is revealed by a systematic investigation of crystal mechanical properties, probed with nanoindentation, and crystal structure analysis. The order of bulk powder tabletability of the three materials is identical to that of single crystal plasticity (saccharin > piroxicam > cocrystal). The lowest plasticity of the cocrystal is confirmed by its highest crystal hardness and the highest yield strength. The low plasticity of the cocrystal is attributed to structural packing features that discourage plastic deformation. This work demonstrates that cocrystallization, even though it may be useful to improve pharmaceutically relevant properties, must be carefully evaluated to avoid unexpected problems in formulation and drug product manufacturing due to compromised mechanical properties.

  • 82.
    Cho, Wonkyung
    et al.
    College of Pharmacy, Yonsei University.
    Kim, Min-Soo
    College of Pharmacy, Pusan National University.
    Jung, Min-Sook
    College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University.
    Park, Junsung
    College of Pharmacy, Yonsei University.
    Cha, Kwang-Ho
    College of Pharmacy, Yonsei University.
    Kim, Jeong-Soo
    College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University.
    Alhalaweh, Amjad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Park, Hee Jun
    College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University.
    Hwang, Sung-Joo
    College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University.
    Design of salmon calcitonin particles for nasal delivery using spray-drying and novel supercritical fluid-assisted spray-drying processes2015In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 478, no 1, p. 288-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this study was to prepare a nasal powder formulation of salmon calcitonin (sCT) using an absorption enhancer to improve its bioavailability. In this work, powder formulations for nasal delivery of sCT were studied using various absorption enhancers and stabilizers. Powders were prepared by two different methods: conventional spray-drying (SD) and novel supercritical fluid-assisted spray-drying (SASD) to investigate the role of CO2 in the particle formation process. The prepared sCT powder formulations were characterized by several analyses; powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy method. The particle size distribution was also evaluated. In vivo absorption tests were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rat using the prepared powder formulations, and the results were compared to those of raw sCT. Quantitative analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated that sCT was chemically stable after both the SD and SASD processes. Results of PXRD, SEM, and FT-IR did not indicate a strong interaction or defragmentation of sCT. The in vivo absorption test showed that SD- and SASD-processed sCT powders increased the bioavailability of the drug when compared to the nasal administration of raw sCT. In addition, SASD-processed sCT exhibited higher nasal absorption when compared with SD-processed sCT in all formulations due to a reduction of particle size. The results from this study illustrate that the preparation of nasal powders using the SASD process could be a promising approach to improve nasal absorption of sCT.

  • 83.
    Constantinou, Martha
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Dimopoulos, Petros
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza, Università di Roma.
    Frezzotti, Roberto
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma.
    Herdoisa, Gregorio
    NIC, DESY.
    Jensen, Karl
    NIC, DESY.
    Lubicz, Vittorio
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma.
    Panagopoulos, Haralambos G.
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Rossi, Giancarlo
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma.
    Simula, Silvano
    INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre.
    Stylianou, Fotos
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Vladikas, Anastassios
    INFN, Sezione di Tor Vergata.
    Non-perturbative renormalization of quark bilinear operators with N f = 2 (tmQCD) Wilson fermions and the tree-level improved gauge action2010In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, Vol. 8, article id 068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present results for the renormalization constants of bilinear quark operators obtained by using the tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and the N f = 2 twisted mass fermion action at maximal twist, which guarantees automatic O(a)-improvement. Our results are also relevant for the corresponding standard (un-twisted) Wilson fermionic action since the two actions only differ, in the massless limit, by a chiral rotation of the quark fields. The scale-independent renormalization constants Z V, Z A and the ratio Z P /Z S have been computed using the RI-MOMapproach, as well as other alternative methods. For Z A and Z P /Z S, the latter are based on both standard twisted mass and Osterwalder-Seiler fermions, while for Z V a Ward Identity has been used. The quark field renormalization constant Z q and the scale dependent renormalization constants Z S, Z P and Z T are determined in the RI-MOM scheme. Leading discretization effects of O(g 2a 2), evaluated in one-loop perturbation theory, are explicitly subtracted from the RI-MOM estimates

  • 84.
    Constantinou, Martha
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Dimopoulos, Petros
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza, Università di Roma.
    Frezzotti, Roberto
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma.
    Jensen, Karl
    DESY.
    Gimenez, Vicent Castillo
    Departament de Fisica Teòrica and IFIC, Univ. de València-CSIC.
    Lubicz, Vittorio
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma.
    Mescia, Frederico
    Departament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Matéria, Universitat de Barcelona.
    Panagopoulos, Haralambos G.
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Papinutto, Mauro
    Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, UJF/CNRS-IN2P3/INPG.
    Rossi, Giancarlo
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma.
    Simula, Silvano
    INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre.
    Skouroupathis, Apostolos
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Stylianou, Fotos
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Vladikas, Anastassios
    INFN, Sezione di Tor Vergata.
    BK-parameter from Nf=2 twisted mass lattice QCD2011In: Physical Review D. Particles and fields, ISSN 0556-2821, E-ISSN 1089-4918, Vol. 83, no 1, article id 014505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an unquenched Nf=2 lattice computation of the B K parameter which controls K0-K̄0 oscillations. A partially quenched setup is employed with two maximally twisted dynamical (sea) light Wilson quarks, and valence quarks of both the maximally twisted and the Osterwalder-Seiler variety. Suitable combinations of these two kinds of valence quarks lead to a lattice definition of the BK parameter which is both multiplicatively renormalizable and O(a) improved. Employing the nonperturbative RI-MOM scheme, in the continuum limit and at the physical value of the pion mass we get BKRGI=0.729±0.030, a number well in line with the existing quenched and unquenched determinations.

  • 85.
    Constantinou, Martha
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Dimopoulos, Petros
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza, Università di Roma.
    Frezzotti, Roberto
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma.
    Lubicz, Vittorio
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma.
    Panagopoulos, Haralambos G.
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Skouroupathis, Apostolos
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Stylianou, Fotos
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Perturbative renormalization factors and Oða2Þ corrections for latticefour-fermion operators with improved fermion/gluon actions2011In: Physical Review D. Particles and fields, ISSN 0556-2821, E-ISSN 1089-4918, Vol. 83, no 7, article id 074503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we calculate the corrections to the amputated Green's functions of four-fermion operators, in 1-loop lattice perturbation theory. One of the novel aspects of our calculations is that they are carried out to second order in the lattice spacing, O(a2). We employ the Wilson/clover action for massless fermions (also applicable for the twisted mass action in the chiral limit) and a family of Symanzik improved actions for gluons. Our calculations have been carried out in a general covariant gauge. Results have been obtained for several popular choices of values for the Symanzik coefficients (Plaquette, Tree-level Symanzik, Iwasaki, TILW and DBW2 action). While our Green's function calculations regard any pointlike four-fermion operators which do not mix with lower dimension ones, we pay particular attention to ΔF=2 operators, both parity conserving and parity violating (F stands for flavor: S, C, B). By appropriately projecting those bare Green's functions we compute the perturbative renormalization constants for a complete basis of four-fermion operators and we study their mixing pattern. For some of the actions considered here, even O(a0) results did not exist in the literature to date. The correction terms which we calculate (along with our previous O(a2) calculation of Z Ψ) are essential ingredients for minimizing the lattice artifacts which are present in nonperturbative evaluations of renormalization constants with the RI-MOM method. Our perturbative results, for the matrix elements of ΔF=2 operators and for the corresponding renormalization matrices, depend on a large number of parameters: coupling constant, number of colors, lattice spacing, external momentum, clover parameter, Symanzik coefficients, gauge parameter. To make these results most easily accessible to the reader, we have included them in the distribution package of this paper, as an ASCII file named: 4-fermi.m; the file is best perused as Mathematica input. The main results of this work have been applied to improve nonperturbative estimates of the BK-parameter in N F=2 twisted mass lattice QCD

  • 86.
    Constantinou, Martha
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Lubicz, Vittorio
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma.
    Panagopoulos, Haralambos G.
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    Stylianou, Fotos
    Department of Physics, University of Cyprus.
    (a 2) corrections to the one-loop propagator and bilinears of clover fermions with Symanzik improved gluons2009In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, Vol. 10, article id 064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We calculate corrections to the fermion propagator and to the Green's functions of all fermion bilinear operators of the form , to one-loop in perturbation theory. We employ the Wilson/clover action for fermions and the Symanzik improved action for gluons. The novel aspect of our calculations is that they are carried out to second order in the lattice spacing, (a 2). Consequently, they have addressed a number of new issues, most notably the appearance of loop integrands with strong IR divergences (convergent only beyond 6 dimensions). Such integrands are not present in (a 1) improvement calculations; there, IR divergent terms are seen to have the same structure as in the (a 0) case, by virtue of parity under integration, and they can thus be handled by well-known techniques. We explain how to correctly extract the full (a 2) dependence; in fact, our method is generalizable to any order in a. The (a 2) corrections to the quark propagator and Green's functions computed in this paper are useful to improve the nonperturbative RI-MOM determination of renormalization constants for quark bilinear operators. Our results depend on a large number of parameters: coupling constant, number of colors, lattice spacing, external momentum, clover parameter, Symanzik coefficients, gauge parameter. To make these results most easily accessible to the reader, we have included them in the distribution package of this paper, as an ASCII file named: Oa2results.m; the file is best perused as Mathematica input

  • 87.
    Dahlström, Josefin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Bergström Wuolo, Maya
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    "Att min hjärta har ingen ont": Vad nyanlända elever i Sverige upplever som hälsofrämjande2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns stora ojämlikheter mellan nyanlända och personer födda i Sverige kopplat till bland annat psykisk ohälsa. Hälsans betydelse för nyanländas integrationsprocess uppmärksammas inte tillräckligt, det finns ett stort behov av hälsofrämjande insatser. Dock finns det kunskapsluckor inom ämnet. Studiens syfte var att beskriva vad nyanlända elever upplever som hälsofrämjande. Eftersom hälsopromotion riktat till nyanlända är ett relativt okänt område valdes kvalitativ metod för att besvara syftesfrågan. Datainsamlingen har skett med hjälp av öppna brev där deltagarna fick fortsätta på meningen “Nu ska jag rita och berätta om en dag då jag mådde bra, det var…”. Deltagandet var konfidentiellt och totalt var det 25 deltagare som besvarade breven med hjälp av text och bild. Analysmetoden som använts för studien är latent innehållsanalys som mynnade ut i ett huvudtema; Känner egenmakt som skapar drivkraft att tillsammans med sina nära få dela upplevelser och glädje och tre teman; Få bestämma själv, Finna kraft i tankar och minnen och Känna känslan av ett “vi”. Resultatet visar att deltagarna ser en hälsofrämjande vardag som består av frihet, gemenskap och reflektion. Resultatet visar även på den vardag som deltagarna lever i nu med saknad av hälsofrämjande faktorer som istället präglas av oro, ångest och depression. Slutsatsen är att det finns ett behov av insatser inom hälsopromotion för att främja de nyanlända elevernas hälsa och välbefinnande och på sikt minska den psykiska ohälsan.

  • 88.
    Dalpiaz, Alessandro
    et al.
    University of Ferrara.
    Marchetti, Nicola
    University of Ferrara.
    Cavazzini, Alberto
    University of Ferrara.
    Pasti, Luisa
    University of Ferrara.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Gavini, Elisabetta
    University of Sassari.
    Beggiato, Ssrah
    University of Ferrara.
    Ferraro, Luca
    University of Ferrara, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pharmacol Sect.
    Quantitative determination of zolmitriptan in rat blood and cerebrospinal fluid by reversed phase HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis: application to in vivo preclinical pharmacokinetic study2012In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 901, p. 72-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fast HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for the quantification of the potent and selective antimigraine zolmitriptan in rat blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The assay has been then applied for in vivo preclinical studies. The analytical determination has been used to obtain pharmacokinetics of zolmitriptan in the two biological matrices after its intravenous or nasal administration. Liquid-liquid extraction of zolmitriptan was performed from 100μL rat blood samples in the presence of N 6-cyclopentyladenosine (internal standard) with the employment of ethyl acetate. Calibration standards were prepared by using blood matrix and following the same liquid-liquid extraction procedure. CSF samples were analyzed without any pre-treatment steps and by using an external calibration method in pure water matrix. Chromatographic separation was performed under reversed phase and a gradient elution condition on a C18 packed column (100×2.0mm, 2.5μm particles diameter). The mobile phase was a mixture between acetonitrile, water and formic acid (0.1% v/v). The applied HPLC-MS/MS method allowed low limits of detection, as calculated from calibration curves, of 6.6 and 24.4ng/mL for water matrix and rat blood extracts, respectively. Linearity of the calibration curves was established up to 5μM (1.44μg/mL), as well as good assay accuracy. The intravenous infusion of 20μg zolmitriptan to male Sprague-Dawley rats produced blood concentrations ranging from 9.4±0.7 to 1.24±0.07μg/mL within 10h, with a terminal half-life of 3.4±0.2h. The nasal administration of a water suspension of 20μg zolmitriptan produced blood concentrations ranging from 2.92±0.21 to 0.85±0.07μg/mL within 6h. One hour after zolmitriptan intravenous infusion or nasal administration, its CSF concentrations were 0.0539±0.0016 and 0.0453±0.0012μg/mL, respectively. This study determined the suitability of the herein proposed method to investigate the pharmacokinetics of zolmitriptan after its administration by means of novel formulations and, hence, to evaluate the efficacy of innovative nose-to-brain drug delivery in preclinical studies.

  • 89.
    Dietrich, Marcelo O.
    et al.
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Souza, DO
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Portela, LV
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sojka, Peter
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå univesity.
    Serum S100B protein: what does it mean during exercise?2004In: Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1050-642X, E-ISSN 1536-3724, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 368-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Dudenko, D.V.
    et al.
    Cardiff University.
    Williams, P.A.
    Cardiff University.
    Hughes, C.E.
    Cardiff University.
    Antzutkin, Oleg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Brown, S.P.
    University of Warwick.
    Harris, K.D.M.
    Cardiff University.
    Exploiting the synergy of powder x-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy in structure determination of organic molecular solids2013In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 117, no 23, p. 12258-12265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a strategy for structure determination of organic materials in which complete solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data is utilized within the context of structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Following determination of the crystal structure from powder XRD data, first-principles density functional theory-based techniques within the GIPAW approach are exploited to calculate the solid-state NMR data for the structure, followed by careful scrutiny of the agreement with experimental solid-state NMR data. The successful application of this approach is demonstrated by structure determination of the 1:1 cocrystal of indomethacin and nicotinamide. The 1H and 13C chemical shifts calculated for the crystal structure determined from the powder XRD data are in excellent agreement with those measured experimentally, notably including the two-dimensional correlation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts for directly bonded 13C-1H moieties. The key feature of this combined approach is that the quality of the structure determined is assessed both against experimental powder XRD data and against experimental solid-state NMR data, thus providing a very robust validation of the veracity of the structure

  • 91.
    Elbadawi, Mohammed
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield.
    Meredith, James
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield.
    Hopkins, Lynne
    Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield.
    Reaney, Ian
    Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield.
    Progress in Bioactive Metal and, Ceramic Implants for Load-Bearing Application2016In: Advanced Techniques in Bone Regeneration / [ed] Alessandro Rozim Zorzi and Joao Batista de Miranda, Croatia: INTECH, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of biomaterials is an exuberant and enticing field, attracting interest across a number of scientific disciplines. Synthetic materials such as metals and ceramics have helped civilisation accomplish many feats, and this can also be said for the achievements in orthopaedic applications. Metals and ceramics have achieved success in non-load-bearing applications and attempts are made to translate the accomplishments into weight-bearing applications. For this, a material needs to be porous but with sufficient strength to withstand daily loading; however, both properties are mutually exclusive. The implant must also avoid causing adverse reactions and toxicity and, preferably, bond to the surrounding tissues. Metals such as stainless steels and chromium-cobalt alloys have been used due to their excellent mechanical properties that can withstand daily activities, but retrospective studies have alluded to the possibilities of significant adverse reaction when implanted within the human body, caused by the elution of metal ions. Lessons from metals have also demonstrated that materials with significantly higher mechanical properties will not necessarily enhance the longevity of the implant—such is the complexity of the human body. Ceramics, on the other hand, exhibit excellent biocompatibility, but their mechanical properties are a significant hindrance for load-bearing use. Thus, the chapter herein provides a select overview of contemporary research undertaken to address the aforementioned drawbacks for both metals and ceramics. Furthermore, the chapter includes a section of how metals and ceramics can be combined in a multi-material approach to bring together their respective properties to achieve a desirable characteristics.

  • 92.
    Elbadawi, Mohammed
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Meredith, James
    Mosalagae, Mosalagae
    Reaney, Ian M
    Porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds fabricated from nano-sized powder via honeycomb extrusion2017In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, E-ISSN 0976-397X, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 377-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have developed hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds for synthetic bone graft from nano-sized HA particles using ceramic extrusion. We also demonstrate that these HA scaffolds show enhanced compressive strength (29.4 MPa), whilst possessing large pore sizes (> 600 µm) that are suitable for bone grafting. The extrusion process involved forming a ceramic paste by mixing the HA powder with a binder and distilled water. The ceramic paste was then fabricated using a ram extruder that was fitted with a honeycomb die to impart large, structured pores. Several green bodies were extruded and then subjected to the same drying and thermal debinding treatment. The samples underwent three different sintering temperatures and two varied dwell times, in order to determine the optimum sintering parameters. The scaffolds were then analysed for their chemical, physical, mechanical and biological properties to elucidate the effects of the sintering parameters on extruded HA scaffolds. The results revealed that the nano-sized particles exhibited a high sinterability, and XRD analysis showed phase purity until 1300 oC. At 1300 oC, trace amounts of phase impurities were detected, however, scaffolds sintered at this temperature exhibited the highest mean compressive strength. The findings demonstrated that traces of phase impurities were not detrimental to the scaffold’s compressive strength. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and density measurements revealed a highly densified solid phase was attained.

  • 93.
    Elbadawi, Mohammed
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Mosalagae, Mosalagae
    Goodall, Russell
    Tape casting and lost carbonate sintering processes for production of heat sinks for portable electronics2017In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, E-ISSN 0976-397X, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 807-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous copper was fabricated by means of a powder metallurgy process applied to tape casting. Lost Carbonate Sintering (LCS) was employed to control porosity within the component during processing. The weight ratio of the potassium carbonate introduced into the matrix ranged from 30-40 wt%. Additives such as; plasticizers, binders, dispersant and solvents were utilized to control the properties throughout the processes and ease fabrication. The component was debinded and sintered at 400 °C and 900 °C respectively, under vacuum. The potassium carbonate was removed from the sintered component via dissolution in water. By using X-ray Florescence (XRF) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) techniques, the effectiveness of the dissolution route at removing the space holder was investigated. The results shows that porous copper produced in this way has porosity ranging from 75-85 % and pore size from 500-766 mm. The component produced has thickness ranging from 1300 -1800 mm.

  • 94.
    Elbadawi, Mohammed
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Wally, Zena J.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Reaney, Ian
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Porous Hydroxyapatite-Bioactive Glass Hybrid Scaffolds Fabricated via Ceramic Honeycomb Extrusion2018In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 101, no 8, p. 3541-3556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The successful fabrication of hydroxyapatite-bioactive glass scaffolds using honeycomb extrusion is presented herein. Hydroxyapatite was combined with either 10 wt% stoichiometric Bioglass® (BG1), calcium-excess Bioglass® (BG2) or canasite (CAN). For all composite materials, glass-induced partial phase transformation of the HA into the mechanically weaker β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) occurred but XRD data demonstrated that BG2 exhibited a lower volume fraction of TCP than BG1. Consequently, the maximum compressive strength observed for BG1 and BG2 were 30.3 ± 3.9 and 56.7 ± 6.9 MPa, respectively, for specimens sintered at 1300 °C. CAN scaffolds, in contrast, collapsed when handled when sintered below 1300 °C, and thus failed. The microstructure illustrated a morphology similar to that of BG1 sintered at 1200 °C, and hence a comparable compressive strength (11.4 ± 3.1 MPa). The results highlight the great potential offered by honeycomb extrusion for fabricating high-strength porous scaffolds. The compressive strengths exceed that of commercial scaffolds, and biological tests revealed an increase in cell viability over seven days for all hybrid scaffolds. Thus it is expected that the incorporation of 10 wt% bioactive glass will provide the added advantage of enhanced bioactivity in concert with improved mechanical stability.

  • 95.
    Engström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Johansson, Maria
    Intensive Care Unit, Gällivare Hospital.
    Mattsson, Mia
    Intensive Care Unit 57, Sunderby Hospital.
    Strömbäck, Ulrica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Nursing Care of ICU Patients Lightly Sedated with Dexmedetomidine2016In: Journal of Clinical Intensive Care and Medicine, Vol. 1, p. 5-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intensive care patients are often in need of sedation to endure being intubated. Lightsedation is increasingly common since it has been proved to offer benefi ts such as faster recovery to patients.Aim: The aim of this study was to describe critical care nurses’ experiences of nursing patients lightlysedated with dexmedetomidine.Research Methodology: Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2015 with 10 critical carenurses in Sweden. Interview transcripts were analysed using inductive qualitative thematic analysis.Results: Light sedation of the patient facilitated communication and interaction with him or her, and therelationship between the patient and his or her family members. Dexmedetomidine was described as a fairlynew drug, and the critical care nurses stated that they needed more knowledge about it and about sedationscales in order to learn more about the drug’s mechanism of action and its potential side effects on patients.Conclusion: It is important to critical care nurses to learn more about dexmedetomidine and about sedationscales to assess levels of sedation, as light sedation has been shown to benefi t the patient as opposed to deepsedation that can increase recovery time.

  • 96.
    Enström, Therés
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Hedman, Zara
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Tack!: Kvinnors upplevelse av att föra tacksamhetsdagbok2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is strong evidence that gratitude can create wellbeing; for example by increasing self-esteem, reduce stress and enable healthy habits. Keeping a gratitude journal may be a way of practicing a grateful approach by reflecting on, and writing down, things to be grateful for on a daily basis. The aim of this study was to describe women’s experiences with keeping a gratitude journal and to shine light on what they feel grateful for. To address the aim of the study, a qualitative method was used. A one week long internet based intervention with 19 participants took place and the data collection consisted of both the journals of the participants as well as open letters. The collected material was analyzed through a latent content analysis and resulted in the development of one main theme “gratitude brightens up your day and increases quality of life” and four sub-themes; (1) a stronger relationship to oneself through a mirror of appreciation, (2) reflection shines light on life and creates coherence, (3) increased presence adds value to big and small things and (4) gratitude feeds gratitude and creates everyday happiness. The result shows that keeping a gratitude journal helps form a stronger relationship to oneself as well as to one’s surroundings and to life as a whole, thereby creating appreciation and wellbeing. The result is discussed in relation to health promotion theories with a focus on practical usage of the gratitude journal as a health promotion tool to be used for the purpose of strengthening mental health and wellbeing.

  • 97.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    The use of photos from patch-test reactions on day 7 taken by mobile phones by professional ice hockey players in Sweden investigated for the presence of occupational dermatoses2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Bruze, M.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital.
    The use of photos from patch-test reactions on day 7 taken by mobile phones by professional ice hockey players in Sweden investigated for the presence of occupational dermatoses2016In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 75, no Suppl. 1, p. 39-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    survey was undertaken in all ice hockey players in 26 professional teams in Sweden representing the two highest divisions. All players answered a questionnaire and the players from six teams, three from each of the two divisions, were patch tested with 72 test preparations in a baseline series supplemented with a series representing the work environment of the players. For practical reasons, the patch testing and test reading on day 3 took place in the arenas of the teams. As a traditional dermatologist reading on day 7 was impossible to perform in all but one team, the players and coaches were asked to use their mobile phones to take photos of the tested backs of the players on day 7 and to send them to the investigative team. In one team a dermatologist reading took place on day 7 independently of the mobile phone photos. In total, 107 players in the six teams were patch tested, and a reading on day 3 was performed in 103. Fifty contact allergic reactions were noted in 26 players. When comparing the reactions present on day 3 with the photos from day 7, seven (14%) more positive reactions were registered. The seven additional reactions were noted to seven different sensitizers: hexavalent chromium, oxidized linalool, thiomersal, mercapto mix, mercaptobenzothiazole, PFR-2 (a resol resin based on phenol and formaldehyde) and methylenedianiline. In summary, 14% more contact allergic reactions were diagnosed when using photos of the tested backs to replace the traditional dermatologist reading.

  • 99.
    Eriksson, Tomas
    et al.
    Occupational and Environmental Dermatology.
    Isaksson, Marlene
    Occupational and Environmental Dermatology.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, University of Malmo-Lund.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Occupational and Environmental Dermatology.
    conact allergy in ice hockey players in Sweden2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 100. Erlandsson, Maja
    et al.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University.
    Månsson, Helena Lindmark
    Mjölk & mejeriprodukter: viktiga näringskällor2005In: Vaar Foeda, ISSN 0042-2657, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 30-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1234567 51 - 100 of 544
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