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  • 51.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Collaborative Design2015In: Indian Institute of Science. Journal, ISSN 0970-4140, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 353-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global cooperation is a reality for most engineering design teams today, and even though the core group is co-located, they are forced to cooperate with subcontractors or experts with complementary knowledge and skills. The design process can be seen as an integration of a technical, cognitive and social process, and such process is clearly multidisciplinary. This review presents research challenges and emerging directions for future research and focuses on interpersonal communication in collaborative design – small teams of interdisciplinary stakeholders who work jointly toward a common goal that would not otherwise be accomplished by the individual participants themselves.

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  • 52.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Distributed engineering: tools and methods for collaborative product development2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering design is fundamentally social, requiring much interaction and communication between the people involved. Additionally, good design often relies upon the ability of a cross-functional team to create a shared understanding of the task, the process, and the respective roles of its members. Coordination and exchange of information between participants in a distributed product development team is technically difficult and time consuming, where different locations and time zones further complicate communication. It is therefore important to provide tools and methods so that a geographically distributed design team can also collaborate as co- located teams do. Successful teamwork in geographically distributed teams is not only dependent on formal meetings; they are also highly dependent on tools that support informal communication, such as opportunistic and spontaneous interaction. Such informal communication is responsible for much of the information flow in an organisation. A distributed engineering environment must support many forms of collaboration: formal meetings with high quality videoconferencing, brainstorming sessions where people use their body language and whiteboards to clarify their ideas, and informal and mobile communication. This thesis presents a distributed engineering environment that uses broadband conferencing, shared multimedia, shared whiteboards, application sharing, and a distributed virtual reality environment for sharing engineering information. The system also supports lightweight informal communication such as the web based contact portal combining several information channels in one place, e.g. e-mail archives, awareness cameras, diaries, instant messaging, and SMS. The Contact Portal is the natural starting point for initiating and maintaining contact with remote team members. The thesis also presents how mobility support for distributed collaborative teamwork can be designed. The physical environment where the collaboration is done is also very important; the design of several types of collaboration environments is presented and evaluated, from high end studios to low end personal workspaces. The development of the environment is based on several case studies of distributed work where the tools have been used and evaluated in a realistic environment in close collaboration with several industrial companies such as Volvo Car Corporation, Conex, Hägglunds Drives and Alkit Communications.

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  • 53.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Distributed engineering via broadband: a case study2003In: Research for practice - innovation in products, processes and organisations: ICED 03, 14th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 19 - 21 August 2003, The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm / organized by the Royal Institute of Technology / [ed] Anders Folkeson, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 54.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Implementation of integrated learning experiences and active learning in a creative concept development course2020In: Bidrag från 7:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Lennart Pettersson, Karin Bolldén, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2020, p. 115-121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A designer needs to possess capabilities and knowledge outside the traditional engineering domains – these capabilities and experiences are difficult to obtain in a traditional classroom setting; therefore, the integrated learning experiences can provide the experience and training of these capabilities. A crucial part of design education is to teach students the ability to cope with uncertainty and ambiguity – traits of a successful designer.

    The paper presents the design of a course in creative concept development that implements several educational ideas from active learning, which is an improvement over traditional learning. Active learning focuses on engaging students in and outside the classroom, an essential part of active learning includes mixing between theory and practical exercises and here it is crucial that the physical environment quickly adapts to different types of learning activities.

    The paper shows three concrete examples of how to integrate active learning – learning outside the classroom, guided design and role-play and games. The course has reflection and feedback throughout, both as an integral part of the lectures and assessment. To complement active learning, we must have effective evaluation processes to measure them. Different categories of learning outcomes require different assessment methods.

    Through continuous improvement, much based on the students' feedback and reflections, the course is very popular with students.  Students appreciate the mix of exercises, unconventional presentations, challenges and games. Students also appreciate the breadth of assessment that s assess an in-depth understanding.

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  • 55.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Implementing and assessing soft skills in the engineering curriculum2023In: Bidrag från den 9:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Joel Midemalm; Amir Vadiee; Elisabeth Uhlemann; Fredrik Georgsson; Gunilla Carlsson-Kvarnlöf; Jonas Månsson; Kristina Edström; Lennart Pettersson; Pedher Johansson, Mälardalens universitet, 2023, p. 303-308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the crucial need for engineering students to acquire both soft and hard skills for a successful career. While technical skills are essential, soft skills like communication, collaboration, problem-solving, leadership, and adaptability are equally vital. Traditional engineering education programs often neglect soft skill development, leaving students without structured guidance. This paper presents a strategic curriculum approach within an Industrial Design Engineering program that emphasises progressive skill development. It includes a competence profile and continuous self-assessment to encourage student reflection and growth. Additionally, a transformative process is introduced in a third-year capstone project, helping students identify and actively improve personal and interpersonal skills. The results underscore the importance of systematic soft skill development through reflective practice and assessment, offering valuable insights for engineering education.

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  • 56.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Improving Written Communication: Implementation at Industrial Design Engineering2019In: The 15th International CDIO Conference: Proceedings – Full Papers / [ed] Jens Bennedsen, Aage Birkkjær Lauritsen, Kristina Edström, Natha Kuptasthien, Janne Roslöf, Robert Songer, Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2019, p. 323-332Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to present how we have improved the quality of technical writing for students in Industrial Design Engineering at Luleå University of Technology. To achieve this, we have identified a number of courses focusing on verbal and written communication, one course – Product and production design focus on documenting and reporting a technical development work to a client. During the last seven years, the course has continuously been improved, and this paper contains an in-depth review of the course performed during spring 2018. The review was done by discussions in the teaching team, interviews, workshops, analysis of course documentation (course-reviews, course-pm, assessment-scheme etc.). The evolution of the course and how different support systems have been implemented such as peer-reviews, templates, formative feedback and self-assessment has been developed is described in detail. The current course is designed as a stage gate process with four design reviews, in which the student present and receive critique. At each design review, each team produces a short process memo (PM) that is peer-reviewed. Each student conducted three individual peer reviews, as well as group review. With 56 students in the class (spring 2018) over 180 completed peer reviews are performed by the students themselves before they receive formative feedback from the teachers. Self-assessment is also used, first by the team on their own final documentation. Finally, all student performs a personal self-assessment with feedback from their team members. The final assessment of the student is performed by the teachers and the result is similar to the students’ self-assessment.

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  • 57.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Innovationspiloter: studenter ökar innovationsförmågan hos företag2014In: NU 2014: Umeå 8-10 oktober : abstracts, Umeå: Umeå universitet. Pedagogiska institutionen , 2014, p. 203-Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 58.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Product models and environment for distributed engineering1999Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
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  • 59.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Product models for distributed engineering1999In: Proceedings / Produktmodeller -98, 10-11 november [1998], Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 1999, p. 79-90Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced computer graphics and simulation techniques are important tools within product development today. Product concepts can be realised in the virtual workspace - visualisations and simulations for verifying the behaviour of the product can be performed without physical parts actually being manufactured. Co-ordination and exchange of information between participants in a distributed team is technically difficult and time consuming. New methodologies and systems for distributed collaboration are of great importance. This paper describes the special demands for distributed engineering regarding standards and how the data exchange and storage can be solved in a distributed engineering environment. It also describes an environment for distributed engineering over broadband networks that has been developed as part of the research work. The system includes applications such as a videoconferencing system, a document server for multimedia objects and a distributed VR system.

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  • 60.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Specification of tolerance inspection in I-DEAS: Thesis: Master of Science in Mechanichal Engineering1996Report (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Using distributed VR and broadband conferencing for product development2001In: Unternehmenswerte durch Technologie : Vorträge = Stakeholder value by technology, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a collaborative product development demonstration over a broadband network using both distributed VR and video-conferencing. Two different types of physical collaboration environments were used including one with life-sized conferencing. The scenario included a product review of a nanosatelite with participants at two different places in Sweden located 1500 km apart.

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  • 62.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Eklöf, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Strategic development of personal and interpersonal skills2021In: DS 110: Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (E&PDE 2021), VIA Design, VIA University in Herning, Denmark. 9th -10th September 2021: Continuity and Adaptability in Design and Engineering Education / [ed] Hilary Grierson; Erik Bohemia; Lyndon Buck, The Design Society, 2021, article id 1168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal and interpersonal skills are an essential part of design engineers’ knowledge and skills, which students rarely feel they work with in a structured way during their education. To improve soft skills, the ideas on developing students’ personal and interpersonal skills were implemented in design- implement experience, a 15 ECTS third-year capstone project for bachelor students. Parallel to the design project, students had to identify personal or interpersonal skills that they wanted to develop during the course. Personal development was done in several stages: Identification of personal development areas (PDA), discussion of PDA in group meetings, creating a development plan, personal coach meetings, status update and a final reflection 

    The results of this paper are based on teachers notes, written documentation and course evaluations. In the analysis, development areas were categorised using the CDIO Syllabus 2.0, where 59% was classified as Personal skills and 40% related to Interpersonal skills. The perseverance subset was the most common one identified. Other areas included lack of self-confidence, conflict mediation, creating a constructive dialogue between team members and time and resource management. Using this approach for three years and analysing the implementation, we can conclude that it has improved students’ personal and interpersonal skills. The results also highlight that students like to be challenged to change their professional conduct. 

  • 63.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Garrido, Pablo
    5 senses of interaction: a model for categorising collaborative tools and creative methods2012In: Proceedings of the the 12th International Design Conference, DESIGN 2012: May 21-24 2012, Dubrovnik, Croatia / [ed] D Marjanović; Mario Štorga ; N. Pavković ; N. Bojčetić, Dubrovnik: Design Research Society, 2012, p. 569-578Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative tools today are not adapted to the real needs of the collaborators, instead the collaborators have to adapt to existing technology. This work explore the designer’s behaviour in creative collaborative design meetings and create a graphic approach – 5 senses of interaction which can be used to assess and evaluate interaction needs for a meeting or for assessing an existing collaborative technology. The visual method gives the user a better understanding of the interaction requirements and can be used to find out a suitable collaboration tool.

  • 64.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Re-experiencing engineering meetings: knowledge reuse challenges from virtual meetings2006In: Challenges in collaborative engineering: CCE '06 ; state of the art and future challenges in collaborative design ; proceedings of the international workshop, April 19 - 20 2006, Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with DDECS '06 / [ed] Leandro Soares Indrusiak, Gliwice: Interprint , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 65.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Supporting informal communication in distributed engineering design teams2002In: Proceedings: CIRP Design Seminar : 16 - 18 May 2002, [Hong Kong], Hong Kong, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful teamwork in geographically distributed teams is highly dependent on tools that support informal communication, such as opportunistic and spontaneous interaction. Such informal communication is responsible for much of the information flow in an organization. This paper presents how informal communication was supported in the Distributed Team Innovation project, a joint product development effort between Luleå University of Technology, Stanford University and Volvo Car Corporation. A webbased Contact Portal was created in order to support informal communication and information sharing in a distributed engineering design team. The Contact Portal has been a valuable asset in the project, primarily because it combines several information channels; e-mail archives, awareness cameras, diaries, instant messaging, and SMS etcetera in one place. The Contact Portal was a natural starting point for initiating and maintaining contact with remote team members. The small window of opportunity made it difficult to continuously plan and hold formal meetings (videoconferences and telephone conferences), so the opportunistic interactions have been an important part of the information sharing in the project.

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  • 66.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics.
    Towards true collaboration in global design teams?2005In: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 05: 15 - 28 August 2005 / [ed] Andrew Samuel; William Lewis, Barton: Institution of Engineers, Australia , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s collaboration tools can support formal meetings to a certain extent, though there is still an immense potential for improvement when it comes to designing virtual and physical places where global design teams can collaborate in more ‘natural’ ways than existing distributed environments allow. One challenge for global product development is to support true collaboration within global design teams, where diversity and competences of the whole team can be utilized and where team members can think together rather then merely exchange information, opinions and divide work. This paper summarizes the results of several case studies and development projects performed within the Polhem Laboratory over the last four years and proposes challenges for future research. From our findings some of the most important challenges are how to support users with communication tools for more natural formal and informal communication (i.e. as a co-located team communicates), while automatically storing information and context from the distributed meetings.

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  • 67.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Larsson, Lisa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Eklöf, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Longitudinal Evaluation of Self-Assessment and Peer Review in a Capstone Course2023In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, E&PDE 2023 / [ed] Buck, Lyndon; Grierson, Hilary; Bohemia, Erik, The Design Society , 2023, article id 1243Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sonalkar, Neeraj
    Stanford University.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Blanco, Eric
    Grenoble Institute of Technology.
    Hicks, Ben
    University of Bath.
    McAlpine, Hamish
    University of Bath.
    Lessons learned and future challenges for design observatory research2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video observation has been used for ethnographic studies for decades and is becoming more popular in engineering design research. This paper presents some of the lessons learned of using design observation in research. The paper focuses on the design and usage of physical environments designed specifically for design team observation – Design Observatories (DO). The paper argues that in the past DO focused on observation, whereas DO of the future will provide real time analysis and the possibility to intervene to improve the design activity. Five different types of studies are identified and categorized. Three different design observatories and the rationale for their design are described, as well as twelve design studies ranging from short experiments to long ethnographic studies in industry. Finally, the implications for design observatory research are presented – DO must support an iterative research approach, since design experiments are emergent and are not defined up front. There is a need for a more longitudinal capture of data and the emergence of robust coding schemes that enable machine coding needs to be supported.

  • 69.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Stenius, Mårten
    SICS.
    Johanson, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Jeppsson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Collaboration environments for distributed engineering: development of a prototype system1999In: Proceedings of Fourth International Workshop on CSCW in Design: September 29 - October 1, 1999, Compiègne, France / [ed] Jean-Paul Barthès, Compiègne: Université de Technologique de Compiègne , 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose a model for collaboration between engineers in a distributed environment based on a suite of specialized computer tools. The system is built around the distributed virtual reality system DIVE that has been customized for interoperability with existing CAD systems. Other tools supporting the information exchange process in a product development project include audio/video conferencing software, shared workspace systems for document sharing, application sharing tools, shared whiteboard applications and more. The paper discusses the components of the collaboration environment both from a technical standpoint as well as in respect to usability issues.

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  • 70.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Evaluation of workbooks as an active learning tool for industrial design engineering2022In: DS 117: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (E&PDE 2022): Disrupt, Innovate, Regenerate & Transform / [ed] Bohemia, Erik; Buck, Lyndon; Grierson, Hilary, The Design Society, 2022, article id 1128Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    TD-Challenge: erfarenheter från temadag för Teknisk design2014In: NU 2014: Umeå 8-10 oktober : abstracts, Umeå: Umeå universitet. Pedagogiska institutionen , 2014, p. 191-Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 72.
    Wikberg Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Normark, Jörgen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Öhrling, Therese
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Experiences of educational reform: Implementation of cdio at industrial design engineering2017In: Proceedings of the 13th International CDIO Conference, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, June 18-­22, 2017, University of Calgary Press, 2017, Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Luleå University of Technology (LTU) joined the CDIO initiative in 2015. The development of the MSc program Industrial Design Engineering (IDE) was one of LTU’s four test pilots of educational reform with support of the CDIO framework. The current educational reform comprises all CDIO standards, however some have been easier to implement than others. The results from the current CDIO-implementation are so far positive experiences from both faculty and students. While the program curriculum has been developed at a macro level, changes also impact the program objectives, teachers’ skills development, and students’ learning outcomes at a micro level where, for example, courses have been redesigned regarding teaching and learning activities, and assessments have been developed to include both formative and summative feedback to promote a deep learning approach. Great efforts have also been put into development of new learning environments, finalized in 2016. However, implementation of CDIO also deals with changing the educational culture, a work that takes more efforts and time than just one year. A success factor in the current implementation is the involvement of experienced CDIO-implementers that have inspired, motivated and coached the IDE faculty in re-designing the program. 

  • 73.
    Wikberg Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Implementation of workbooks as an active learning tool for Industrial Design Engineering2020In: Bidrag från 7:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Lennart Pettersson, Karin Bolldén, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2020, p. 161-163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the workbook approach. It is a tool for active and self-regulated learning, allowing for teachers to guide students in a certain direction and to provide clear goals in otherwise rather open-ended design projects.  The learning strategies self-regulated students employ support setting up goals and evaluate their performance, this strategy is guided by the workbook approach. Hence, it supports also previously non-self-regulated learners in devoting to the projects in more informed ways.  Industrial design engineering is unique compared to other engineering educations as it combines both artistic and scientific approaches and practices, it combines technical rationality and reflective practice. Typical design projects address the social, economical, cultural, material and technical dimensions of a situation in iterative design thinking cycles of gaining empathy for user needs, visualizing and materializing ideas and concepts and testing with users to inform the process. The workbook approach is a tool to guide such open-ended projects through cycles of reflection in- and on- actions. This informs learning and understanding during the process, rather than afterwards when final results is done. The workbook approach is currently implemented in five compulsory and several elective courses at Industrial Design Engineering (IDE) at Luleå University of Technology (LTU). The results so far are indications of better self-regulation in subsequent courses and students’ understandings of the end-result not being the project result, but for them to be the next generation of independent design engineers. As of yet, this is a work-in-progress and more studies are needed to provide evidence of concept such as more active and/or self-regulated learners. The workbook approach however seems to contribute in students being more independent as it guides them through the project process. In conclusion, based on our preliminary findings, we consider that the workbook approach shows indications of being a tool to support active and self-regulated learning in open-ended design projects.

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  • 74.
    Wikberg Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Student Competence Profiles – a complementary or competetive approach to CDIO?2016In: The 12th International CDIO Conference: Proceedings – Full papers / [ed] Jerker Björkqvist; Kristina Edström; Ronald J. Hugo; Juha Kontio; Janne Roslöf; Rick Sellens; Seppo Virtanen, Turku, 2016, p. 844-858Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For students to develop independent learning strategies, it is essential to have anunderstanding of what it is they are aiming for. For this reason, every educational programme in Sweden has learning outcomes as stated by the Swedish Higher Education Authority.However, these are rather formal and sometimes described in a way that is not easy, either for teachers or for students, to implement in teaching and learning activities. A challenge is to both apply CDIO-standards and comply with the Swedish Higher Education Authority’s stated learning objectives. At the same time, we should uphold students’ motivation to develop their competences and teachers’ understanding of which teaching and learning activities are relevant, and how and what to assess in students’ learning to contribute to all of these approaches. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a competence profile. The idea is primarily based on the Vitae Research Development Framework, but with inspiration from several other frameworks and approaches. The competence profile is designed to support students´ individual professional industrial design engineering competences. It allows the students themselves to map their knowledge, skills, experiences and qualities, and also provide support for teachers’ feedback and assessment. In other words,the student competence profile is used to describe what students are supposed to be able to do (prior to courses), what the learning activities are supposed to contribute to (during courses) and for formative and summative feedback of how well it has been done (during and after courses). It also allows a visualisation on how different courses contribute to the overall programme objectives.

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  • 75.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Digital Services and Systems.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Design: Process och metod2021 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Design: process och metod2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    På nittiotalet, då jag utbildade mig till industridesigner på HDK vid Göteborgs Universitet, var det inte många som visste något om det yrket, de frågade ”... menar du kläder?”. Vilken skillnad jämfört med nu när alla verkar veta och tycka något om designade prylar och använder många olika digitala tjänster.Som nyanställd på ett konsultföretag upptäckte jag att inte heller i näringslivet var design speciellt känt. Jag fick ofta prata med kunderna om vilken möjlighet designtänkande kunde vara för dem och deras produkter. Det grundlade en övertygelse hos mig om behovet av strukturerade metoder och ett arbetssätt som kommunicerar väl med kunden. Jag ville arbeta mer med det så 2001 beslutade jag mig för att börja undervisa. Under fem år som lärare i industridesign på HDK och tio år vid Teknisk design på Chalmers har jag använt många böcker med olika inriktningar och möjlighet till fördjupning. Jag har saknat en bra översikt som studenterna kan komma tillbaka till i projekt och som de senare i yrkeslivet kan använda för att visa helheten för andra, tills jag blev inkopplad på den här boken. Det finns idag många olika utbildningar och yrkesvarianter av designers. Fler och fler upptäcker att design är något av det viktigaste som finns. Det påverkar ju oss dagligen, avgör om och när vi väljer något och hur vi använder det. Design är också, som du kommer att märka när du läser boken, mycket mera än bara sakerna vi ser. Ja egentligen kan allt som skapas och formuleras på något sätt vara designat. Men det är skillnad på design och design, ibland är den bara en fördyrande detalj eller uppsnyggning av något, ibland är den innovativ och tar hänsyn till själva användningen och användaren. Det svåraste för de som betraktar eller ska introduceras till design brukar vara förhållandet mellan det objektiva och det subjektiva - vad är sant för alla och vad är bara sant för en utvald grupp? Och vad är den viktigaste delen av design; är det tekniken, nyhetsvärdet, utseendet eller funktionen? Efter att ha sett tusentals projekt och lösningar är jag övertygad om att de lösningar som överlevt, och kommer att överleva längst, är designade av människor som förstått vilka som ska använda deras lösningar och hur användarens behov av form och funktion är. En optimal designlösning är olika för olika människor och olika situationer, när du kan hantera det har du kommit långt som designer. En vanlig missuppfattning om design är att det är något som fixas till i slutet eller att det är en rent konstnärlig process där man väntar på inspiration. Det bästa resultatet kommer när designtänkandet är strukturerat och finns med tidigt. Många av dagens produktsystem är svåra att förstå och använda. Här kan olika professioner hjälpas åt eftersom en av designerns viktigaste uppgift är att analysera och visualisera behov, gränser och innovationsmöjligheter för och tillsammans med andra. Därför behövs förståelse för designtänkande mer än någonsin inom många yrken, såväl tekniskt som socialt. Det är, som jag brukar säga till studenterna, enkelt att göra något svårt men svårt att göra något enkelt - det gäller att hitta essensen av någots existens. Det har varit mycket roligt att få vara en del i framtagandet av den här boken. Här finns en helhet som är sällsynt. Författarna har i Design:process och metod lagt mycket arbete och efterforskningar på att strukturera och ta fram en unik sammansättning av olika synsätt och metoder för alla som vill förstå designarbete och beprövade designverktyg som en helhet. Genom att studera och prova dessa kan den som läser få en korrekt start, bli mer kreativ, göra en bättre presentation av sitt eget designarbete eller förstå andra som arbetar med design. Det här är en bok som borde vara obligatorisk läsning för alla som handskas med utvecklingsprojekt. Örjan SöderbergMaster of Fine Arts i industridesign HDK AIVELektor och programansvarig på Civilingenjörsprogrammet i Teknisk Design på Chalmers tekniska högskola

  • 77.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Snowflake: en bred bok om design- och utvecklingsprocesser2013Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
12 51 - 77 of 77
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