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  • 51.
    Rönnberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Wahlberg, Mats
    Larsson, Anders
    Bollen, Math
    Lundmark, Martin
    Interaction between equipment and power line communication: 9-95 kHz2009In: 2009 IEEE Bucharest PowerTech Proceedings / [ed] Mircea Eremia, IEEE Communications Society, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents detailed measurements of currents flowing between modern electronic devices in a domestic environment. The results shown in this paper cover the frequency range 9 to 95 kHz, being the frequency band dedicated to power-line communication by network operators. Large differences exist between different devices, even when they are of the same type. It is also shown that the voltage waveform and the emission by other equipment have a significant impact on the current flowing between a device and the grid. An important conclusion from the measurements is that the high-frequency currents mainly flow between neighbouring devices.

  • 52.
    Schwanz, Daphne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bagheri, Azam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Active harmonic filters: control techniques review2016In: 17th International Conference on Harmonics and Quality of Power, Piscataway, NJ, 2016, p. 36-41, article id 7783423Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of active filters for harmonic mitigation compensation is increasing together with the improvement of their control techniques. Depending on the situation, the use of one technique instead of the other makes the difference of achieving a better harmonic mitigation or not. In this paper, a review of control techniques related to harmonic filters for harmonic mitigation is presented, together with the advantages and disadvantages. From the literature review it was observed that new techniques are being used and classical ones are being improved.

  • 53.
    Schwanz, Daphne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    A Review of Solutions for Harmonic Mitigation2016In: 2016 17th International Conference on Harmonics and Quality of Power, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Computer Society, 2016, p. 30-35, article id 7783422Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing of non-linear equipments connected in the network, mitigation solutions are needed to avoid and solve harmonic and resonance problems that may damage equipments and avoid their connection into the grid. Several are the solutions given to this problem; however, not all them are suitable for all situations. For it, in this paper a review of the most used harmonic solutions and some new technologies are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are described and the most used passive, active and hybrid solutions are described

  • 54.
    Schwanz, Daphne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Secondary Harmonic Emission in Wind Power Plants,2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Schwanz, Daphne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Some methods for harmonic emission determination in wind power plants2018In: Proceedings of International Conference on Harmonics and Quality of Power, ICHQP, Piscataway, NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The connection of new installations, as wind power plants, into the public grid requires that some conditions are fulfilled. Their aim is among others to ensure a proper power quality in the grid and to ensure a high probability of electromagnetic compatibility. The harmonic emission of individual sources is one of the power quality concerns, because they can damage and increase heating in devices. However, as there are other power electronics loads are connected, the correct assessment of the harmonic emission from one specific source is not straightforward. in this paper, a review of the most used methods for harmonic emission determination is presented and some considerations are discussed regarding their use in wind power plants harmonic contribution. Depending on the application, one method is more suitable than the other. However, assumptions are necessary with any method, especially for the harmonic impedances. For wind power plants not all the presented methods are suitable. Also, further investigations are needed to determine the harmonic impedance of the wind power plant and public grid, especially around resonant frequencies.

  • 56.
    Schwanz, Daphne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Kocewiak, Łukasz Hubert
    DONG Energy Wind Power, Fredericia.
    Harmonic Mitigation in Wind Parks: Active Filter Solutions2016In: 2016 17th International Conference on Harmonics and Quality of Power, 2016, Piscataway, NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016, p. 220-225Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passive solutions are the most used harmonic mitigation methods in wind power plants, but the use of active filters is also a suitable and attractive approach. However, the best location for the connection of these active filters needs to be studied and evaluated. In this paper, a study of the use of active harmonic filters placed at different locations inside a wind power plant is performed. The results for current and voltage harmonic distortion are compared and discussed to determine the most suitable location for placing active harmonic filters within a wind power plant

  • 57.
    Schwanz, Daphne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Kocewiak, Łukasz Hubert
    DONG Energy Wind Power, Fredericia.
    Harmonic mitigation in wind power plants: Active filter solutions2016In: 17th International Conference on Harmonics and Quality of Power, Piscataway, NJ, 2016, p. 220-225, article id 7783321Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passive solutions are the most used harmonic mitigation methods in wind power plants, but the use of active filters is also a suitable and attractive approach. However, the best location for the connection of these active filters needs to be studied and evaluated. In this paper, a study of the use of active harmonic filters placed at different locations inside a wind power plant is performed. The results for current and voltage harmonic distortion are compared and discussed to determine the most suitable location for placing active harmonic filters within a wind power plant

  • 58.
    Schwanz, Daphne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Busatto, Tatiano
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    A stochastic study of harmonic voltage distortion considering single-phase photovoltaic inverters2018In: Proceedings of International Conference on Harmonics and Quality of Power, ICHQP, Piscataway, NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the hosting capacity considering harmonic distortion is estimated for single-phase-connected photovoltaic inverters (PVIs) in low-voltage distribution networks. A stochastic approach is used to calculate the harmonic voltage distortion with each customer in the network. The method has been applied to a 6-customer network for the connection of 2.5-kW single-phase PVIs with and without harmonic voltage background. From the results, it was observed that the contribution from 2.5 kW single-phase photovoltaic inverters to the individual harmonic distortion will not cause the established limits to be exceeded. Also, that the harmonic voltage background is often dominating and should be continuously observed.

  • 59.
    Singh, Gaurav
    et al.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clemson University.
    Collins Jr., Randolph
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clemson University.
    Rönnberg, Sarah
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Impact of high frequency conducted voltage disturbances on LED driver circuits2017In: IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting, Piscataway, NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasingly, consumer electronic devices utilize power supplies that have switching frequencies up to several tens of kilohertz. Consequently, emission in the frequency range 2 to 150kHz ('supraharmonics') is continuously increasing. Cases of conducted interference in LED lamps using switched mode power supplies, from supraharmonics have been reported over the past three years. This paper presents results from experiments where supraharmonic voltage distortion was applied to commercially available LED driver circuits. Variations of light output were obtained in some cases, along with evidence pointing to reduced converter efficiency and influence of point on wave of the distortion, on the light output. Importantly, it was shown that electromagnetic compatibility is not converter topology dependent, nor influenced by galvanic isolation. The results demonstrate that converters with similar topology can have vastly different behavior and there is a marked dissimilarity in performance among different topologies.

  • 60.
    Yang, Kai
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Aggregation and amplification of wind-turbine harmonic emission in a wind park2015In: 2015 IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting: 26-30 July 2015, Denver CO, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents measurements of harmonic and interharmonic current (with 5 Hz frequency resolution) in the complex plane. The complex currents are spread around a center point. For interharmonics this center corresponds with the origin of the complex plane. For integer harmonics this center is off-set from the origin. A goodness-of-fit test reveals that phase angles of most interharmonics are uniformly distributed. A Monte-Carlo simulation based on the measurements has been performed to study the aggregation of the emission from individual turbines to the public grid. Low-order integer harmonics show less cancellation compared to high-order harmonics. Interharmonics aggregate close to the square-root rule for uniform phase angles.

  • 61.
    Yang, Kai
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Aggregation and Amplification of Wind-Turbine Harmonic Emission in a Wind Park2015In: IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, ISSN 0885-8977, E-ISSN 1937-4208, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 791-799, article id 7042349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents measurements of harmonic and interharmonic current (with 5 Hz frequency resolution) in the complex plane. The complex currents are spread around a center point. For interharmonics this center corresponds with the origin of the complex plane. For integer harmonics this center is off-set from the origin. A goodness-of-fit test reveals that phase angles of most interharmonics are uniformly distributed. A Monte-Carlo simulation based on the measurements has been performed to study the aggregation of the emission from individual turbines to the public grid. Low-order integer harmonics show less cancellation compared to high-order harmonics. Interharmonics aggregate close to the square-root rule for uniform phase angles.

  • 62.
    Yang, Kai
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Wind power harmonic aggregation of multiple turbines in power bins2014In: International Conference on Harmonics and Quality of Power. Proceedings: , p. 723-727, article id 6842922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents current harmonic and interharmonic measurement of a Type-IV wind turbine. Characterizations and classifications have been performed with the representation of harmonics and interharmonics in a complex plane. The study of aggregations due to the summation of complex currents has been performed based on Monte-Carlo Simulation for harmonics and interharmonics. Aggregations occur less for low-order harmonics, more for high-order harmonics and most for interharmonics. Aggregations are shown to be largely independent of the produced power

  • 63.
    Yang, Kai
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Wahlberg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    A statistic study of harmonics and interharmonics at a modern wind-turbine2014In: International Conference on Harmonics and Quality of Power. Proceedings: , p. 718-722, article id 6842921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presents measurements of harmonics and interharmonics from a modern wind turbine over a period of several days, using a conventional power quality monitor. A statistical study has been performed to present the characteristics of the emission during the measurement. A variation of emission has been observed, especially for interharmonics within certain low-frequency bands and for the switching frequency. Multiple relations between voltage and current components have been presented, as well as multiple relations between the emission and the active-power production. Generally, harmonics are independent of the active-power, whereas interharmonics are dependent on it.

  • 64.
    Yang, Kai
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Bollen, Math
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Larsson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Wahlberg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics.
    Measurements of harmonic emission versus active power from wind turbines2014In: Electric power systems research, ISSN 0378-7796, E-ISSN 1873-2046, no 108, p. 304-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents harmonic measurements from three individual wind turbines (2 and 2.5MW size). Both harmonics and interharmonics have been evaluated, especially with reference to variations in the active-power production. The overall spectra reveal that, emission components may occur at any frequency and not only at odd harmonics. Interharmonics and even harmonics emitted from wind turbines are relatively high. Individual frequency components depend on the power production in dierent ways: characteristic harmonics are independent of power; interharmonics show a strong correlation with power; other harmonic and interharmonic components present various patterns. It is concluded that the power production is not the only factor determining the current emission of a wind energy conversion system.

12 51 - 64 of 64
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