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  • 51. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Innovation and knowledge creation in the integration of technological, organizational and human systems2010In: Fiscar conference proceedings: Helsinki May 23-25, Helsink: School of art and Design, Aalto University , 2010, p. 186-187Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the thinking that since a production system consists of technical components, information, materials and humans, then by looking at the design and creativity in the work activities of mining firms, spaces for innovation and knowledge-creation can be identified that can result in a holistic perspectives on the operation, maintenance, engineering and control of components of the system, that is, mine of the future (Abrahamsson & Johansson, 2008). This is because world's metal mining industry is currently challenged with the prevailing thinking that by replacing humans with machines at all levels in the value chain, a rapid increase of automation and integration of various processes and unit operations can occur, and which by implication can enhance the firm becoming economic viable and competitive. The main objective of this study is to develop the requisite knowledge that allows for the instilling of open collaboration between functions and new communication models in the workforce through the widespread use of social networking technologies in the production systems that will make cross value chain optimisation a reality. Analysis of contradictions (Engeström, 2001) is used to identify the key systemic components of the organization's activity systems for which possible conflicts and troubles can emerge in the technological, organizational and human systems integration processes. In this analysis, the objective for the integration process is appraised against the emerged objectives of actors who carry out the required practices. In this appraisal, methods for creating awareness and insight in an organizational resistance (Abrahamsson, 2009) are used to stimulate creativity and innovativeness in the companies' organizational processes. Two levels of activity (i.e. object-oriented and subject-oriented) are analysed by considering who is engaged in that activity, what their intentions, goals and motives are, and what type of activity they are involved in. Object-oriented activity is analysed from the perspective of a subject using tools on a material object, where the subject of activity is the individual or group of individuals engaged in that activity. Subject-oriented activity (i.e. social interaction) is analysed from the perspective of two or more subjects involvement in an activity constituted through information exchange, personal interactions and mutual understanding. Thus in the analysis of object-oriented activity, inter-subjective relationships are considered, since the object-oriented and subject-oriented aspects of activity continuously transform into one another during task performance (Bedny & Karwowski, 2004).It is argued that by taking a holistic view of the system's functions, production systems can be designed to create harmony between the technical and the social system. It is argued that such design system cannot be conceived as adaptable to humans, but rather to regard humans as resources and/or possibilities of designing better systems (intelligent automation). The understanding here being that a production system must be seen to consists of humans/people and technology (i.e. it must be seen to consist of production processes, infrastructure and flows of digital signals, information, material, energy, products as well as human work and learning). It is therefore concluded that a holistic knowledge (i.e. design) of intelligent production systems entailing the integration between technical, organizational and human systems, as well as deep specialized knowledge in each area can be developed and implemented. The base of such design should also be the acquisition by industries of new mental images of their personal-selves based on new technologies and modern work organizations that support both high productivity and good working conditions. References1. Abrahamsson, L. (2009). Some short texts on mining, production systems and human work science ... Working Paper. Dept. of Human Work Sciences, LTU.2. Abrahamsson, L. & Johansson, J. (2008). Future Mining - Workers' Skills, Identity and Gender When Meeting Changing Technology. Proceedings, First International Future Mining Conference Sydney, NSW, 19 - 21 November 2008: p 213 - 220.3. Bedny, G. Z., & Karwowski, W. (2004). Activity theory as a basis for the study of work, Ergonomics, 47(2), 134-153.4. Engeström, Y. (2001). Expansive learning at work: Toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14(1), 133-156.5. Jarzabkowski, P. (2003). Strategy as social practice: An activity theory perspective on continuity and change. Journal of Management Studies, 40(1), 23-55.

  • 52. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Problem-identification workshop as a future-oriented macroergonomic tool for managing the work environment2010In: Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE IEEM, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2010, p. 492-496Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the challenges that most organizations face in the management of their work environments, with respect to the tools that they can use to effectively capture both the explicit and tacit knowledge held by their employees for subsequent reuse when decisions need to be made. The problem-identification workshop, which is a macroergonomic tool for enhancing the management of work environment in an organization, was tested in an organization. Participants identified organizational problems, proposed solutions to them, realistically assessed the desirability and possibility of these solutions, and finally recommended action plans to the organization for its shortterm, intermediate and long-term design and management of effective work environment towards enhancing work life and productivity in the organization. It was concluded that problem-identification workshop is a good socio-pedagogic method that can be used as an intelligent participatory intervention tool by managers in organizations in the management of their work environments.Keywords - Work environment, problem-identification workshop, participatory ergonomics, acroergonomic tool

  • 53. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Using PIW as a strategic participatory tool to capture implicit knowledge in organizations2011In: Global Journal of Strategies and Governance, ISSN 1923-6042, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 27-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the challenges that most organizations face in the management of their work environments, with respect to the tools that they can use to effectively capture both the explicit and tacit knowledge held by their employees for subsequent reuse when decisions need to be made. The problem-identification workshop (PIW), which is a participatory tool for enhancing the management of work environment in an organization, was tested in an organization. Participants identified organizational problems, proposed solutions to them, realistically assessed the desirability and possibility of these solutions, and finally recommended action plans to the organization for its short-term, intermediate and long-term design and management of effective work environment towards enhancing work life and productivity in the organization. It was concluded that PIW is a good socio-pedagogic method that can be used as an intelligent participatory intervention tool by managers in organizations in the management of their work environments. Keywords: Work environment; Implicit knowledge; Problem-identification workshop; Socio-pedagogic method; Strategic participatory tool.

  • 54.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Conceptualization of the attractive work environment and organizational activity for humans in future deep mines2011In: Proceedings of World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2010-376X, E-ISSN 2070-3740, Vol. 50, p. 1017-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a futureoriented human work environment and organizational activity in deep mines that entails a vision of good and safe workplace. Futureoriented technological challenges and mental images required for modern work organization design were appraised. It is argued that an intelligent-deep-mine covering the entire value chain, including environmental issues and with work organization that supports good working and social conditions towards increased human productivity could be designed. With such intelligent system and work organization in place, the mining industry could be seen as a place where cooperation, skills development and gender equality are key components. By this perspective, both the youth and women might view mining activity as an attractive job and the work environment as a safe, and this could go a long way in breaking the unequal gender balance that exists in most mines today.

  • 55.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Conceptualization of the attractive work environment and organizational activity for humans in future deep mines2011In: International Journal of Human and Social Sciences, ISSN 1307-8046, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a future-oriented human work environment and organizational activity in deep mines that entails a vision of good and safe workplace. Future-oriented technological challenges and mental images required for modern work organization design were appraised. It is argued that an intelligent-deep-mine covering the entire value chain, including environmental issues and with work organization that supports good working and social conditions towards increased human productivity could be designed. With such intelligent system and work organization in place, the mining industry could be seen as a place where cooperation, skills development and gender equality are key components. By this perspective, both the youth and women might view mining activity as an attractive job and the work environment as a safe, and this could go a long way in breaking the unequal gender balance that exists in most mines today.

  • 56.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Towards the integration of technological, organizational and human subsystems of organizations to enhance productivity2011In: 2011 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM), Singapore: IEEE Communications Society, 2011, p. 1628-1632Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the challenges that most organizations, especially in the mining industry, face in managing both technological and human activities along their value chains. The aim was to understand how the organization’s technological, organizational and human components could be integrated to enhance collaboration and productive efficiency. Guided by an organizational activity theory framework, qualitative data were collected through interviews in a mining firm. The analysis of contradictions showed that production work in the mine is challenged due to the lack of proper coordination in task executions, with workers constrained in their task undertakings and unable to reduce downtime. It was concluded that firms can use the framework as an effective instrument, not only for organizational activity and work environment analyses, but as a tool for learning how to understand and manage the systemic characteristics of the technological, organizational and human components of their organizational activity systems.

  • 57.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Miners’ tacit knowledge: a unique resource for developing human-oriented lean mining culture in deep mines2011In: 2011 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM), IEEE Communications Society, 2011, p. 299-404Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explored the significance of retaining aspects of traditional mining culture attributes as value-adding waste in the introduction of lean mining. The purpose was to understand the influences that aspects of human practices derived from miners’ tacit knowledge, and reinforced by traditional mining culture, could have in the molding of a lean culture to facilitate the introduction and sustenance of the lean mining philosophy. Historical and actual data were collected and analyzed by viewing mine culture as attributes, such as values, beliefs, schemas, and implicit theories commonly held among the mine workforce. It is concluded that since the knowledge-oriented human-added value held by individual miners is most commonly transferred through personal experience, such knowledge could be extracted to enhance the development of a human-oriented leaner mining culture to encapsulate the existing lean mining philosophy

  • 58.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Understanding social collaboration between actors and technology in an automated and digitised deep mining environment2011In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 904-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to develop knowledge and learning on the best way to automate organizational activities in deep mines that could lead to the creation of harmony between the human, technical and the social system, towards increased productivity. The findings showed that though the introduction of high-level technological tools in the work environment disrupted the social relations developed over time amongst the employees in most situations, the technological tools themselves became substitute social collaborative partners to the employees. It is concluded that, in developing a digitised mining production system, knowledge of the social collaboration between the humans (miners) and the technology they use for their work must be developed. By implication, knowledge of the human’s subject-oriented and object-oriented activities should be considered as an important integral resource for developing a better technological, organisational and human interactive subsystem when designing the intelligent automation and digitisation systems for deep mines.

  • 59.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Using systemic approach to identify performance enhancing strategies of rock drilling activity in deep mines2012In: Advances in Cognitive Engineering and Neuroergonomics / [ed] Kay M. Stanney; Kelly S. Hale, Boca Raton: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group , 2012, p. 135-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looked at the need for understanding the sociotechnical and psychosocial characteristics of rock drilling activity in deep mines that could lead to the harmonization of the human, technological, and organizational components of the work systems. The aim is to identify performance enhancing strategies that could be used to improve and optimize human-technology collaboration in rock drilling activity in deep mines. Guided by the systemic structural activity theory, data was collected by video recording two skilled miners engaged in two separate rock drilling activities using a high technology drilling machine at a Swedish underground mine. Using the systemic analytical approach, the data obtained were analyzed morphologically and functionally. In the morphological analysis, the constructive features of the rock drilling activity, entailing the logical and spatio-temporal organization of the cognitive behavioral actions and operations involved, were described. In describing the structure of the production drilling activity, the work process was subdivided into tasks. These tasks were analyzed individually in terms of the miners’ mental and motor actions and operations. In the functional analysis, the actions and operations entailed in the rock drilling activity were appraised qualitatively, using systemic principles to identify potential strategies of activity performance. Results from analysis of the miners’ motors actions during the rock drilling activity showed that by using implicit driven strategies, they were able to perform simultaneously two specific tasks that required high levels of concentration and visual control in the normal visual field available to them from inside the protective cabin of the high technology equipment they were using. One task involved the miners’ use of both hands to operate joysticks to control the movements of two robotic arm drills (boomers). The miners other task entailed the visual location of drilling spots on a computer generated drilling surface spots map, and then guiding the robotic arms to the corresponding drill spots marked on the rock surfaces on which the drilling occurs. It is also found that despite the high level of concentration required in performing these two simultaneous tasks, the miners use their implicit knowledge of the rocks and the characteristics of sounds produced by the engagement between the robotic arm drill and the rock surface to enhance their performances. They simultaneously combine their mental actions and motor actions in recognizing and remedying the constraining effects of unfamiliar stimuli during the rock drilling activity. It is concluded that the functional efficiency and effectiveness of rock drilling activity as well as the miner’s productive performance in future automated and digitized deep mines could be enhanced by identifying the implicit characteristics of their performance enhancing actions and operational strategies. Such implicit characteristics of action and operational strategies are used by miners to facilitate the simultaneous functioning of their motor and mental actions, and by implication, enhance their productiveness and task performances in the rock drilling activity in the deep mines. This understanding has future implications in designing a very efficient and effective human-technology collaboration in a highly digitized deep mine work system.

  • 60.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Using systemic structural activity approach in identifying strategies enhancing human performance in mining production drilling activity2014In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536X, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 262-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article seeks to identify performance-enhancing strategies that could be used to improve and optimise human–technology collaboration in rock drilling ‘activity’ in deep mines. Results from the analysis of miners’ motor actions during rock drilling activity showed that by using procedurally driven strategies, they were able to perform simultaneously two specific tasks that required high levels of concentration and visual control in the normal visual field available to them from inside the protective cabin of the high-technology equipment they were using. The miners simultaneously combine their mental actions and motor actions in recognising and remedying the constraining effects of unfamiliar stimuli during the rock drilling task. It is concluded that the functional efficiency and effectiveness of rock drilling as well as the miner’s productive performance infuture automated and digitised deep mines could be enhanced by identifying the procedural characteristics of their performance-enhancing actions and operational strategies.

  • 61.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science. University of Ghana Business School, Legon.
    Kodom-Wiredu, Justice Kwabena
    University of Ghana Business School, Legon.
    Visibilization of Hidden Characteristics of Firefighting Tasks and Factors Predictive of Firefighters’ Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders2019In: Advances in Safety Management and Human Factors: Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Safety Management and Human Factors, July 21-25, 2018, Loews Sapphire Falls Resort at Universal Studios, Orlando, Florida, USA / [ed] Pedro Miguel Ferreira Martins Arezes, Cham, 2019, p. 382-393Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the notion that the Fire-service profession is a strenuous and hazardous occupation, this study explored and identified the hidden characteristics of firefighting tasks, and factors predictive of firefighters’ work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the Ghana Fire Service. Quantitative data was collected from three hundred and six firefighters and analyzed using both factor and correlation analysis. It was found that the firefighters experience several traumas characterized by exposure to human entrapment and loss in fires accidents, and personal terrible sensory experiences, the enormity of which increase with increasing years of firefighting-task performance. The firefighters are also exposed to several WMSDs whose enormity is felt irrespective of years of task performance. It is concluded that the identified hidden aspects of the firefighting-task characteristics provide insights into the enormity of trauma and WMSD associated with the task performance, which could be used to optimize the future design and management of the firefighting-task.

  • 62.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Department of Organization and Human Resource Management, University of Ghana Business School.
    Kuada, John
    Aalborg University.
    Influencing dynamics of culture and employee factors on retail banks’ performances in a developing country context2016In: Management Research Review, ISSN 2040-8269, E-ISSN 2040-8277, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 599-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThis paper investigated the influencing dynamics of culture (national and organizational), employee characteristics, employee job satisfaction, and organizational commitment in determining organizational performances of firms in the retail banking sector in a developing country, such as Ghana. Design/methodology/approachA conceptual framework linking national and organizational cultures to employees’ job satisfaction, job characteristics, organizational commitment and organizational performance was developed and their measurement scales adapted to guide the empirical investigation. Data were collected using a questionnaire filled in by 300 employees in 9 retail banks in Ghana. The results were firstly analyzed by carrying out data reduction of the measured scales using the SPSS-based factor analysis approach. The reduced data obtained from the factor analysis were then analyzed for model goodness fit using the AMOS–based structural equation modeling approach.FindingsEffective organizational performance of retail banks in Ghana is directly influenced by the relationship between organizational culture, employee job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Research limitations/implicationsThe study sample was drawn from a single sub-sector of the Ghanaian economy. Replications and extensions of the study in different sectors that are experiencing high growth will help test the robustness and generalizability of the findings.Practical implicationsThe study has provided empirical knowledge that could be used to understand the influencing interrelationship between organizational culture, employee job satisfaction and organizational commitment on the organizational performances of retail banking firms, in a developing country context.Originality/valueThe study adds to the literature as one of the most comprehensive studies of the link between culture, job satisfaction, employee characteristics and organizational commitment towards organizational performance within the banking sector in Ghana to date.

  • 63.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science. University of Ghana Business School, Legon.
    Mawuena, Emmanuel
    University of Ghana Business School, Legon.
    Understanding the Effect of Emotional Exhaustion on Tellers’ Job Satisfaction in Teller-Task Activity in Ghanaian Retail Banks2019In: Advances in Human Factors and Systems Interaction: Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, July 21-25, 2018, Loews Sapphire Falls Resort at Universal Studios, Orlando, Florida, USA / [ed] Jussi Ilari Kantola, Salman Nazir, Tibor Barath, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 461-472Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the influencing dynamics of tellers’ emotional exhaustion on their job satisfaction necessitated by the increased customer demand of direct teller service in the banking halls, as against the usage of automated teller machines in Ghana. Using a cross-sectional design, quantitative data was collected from five banks with similar institutional arrangements for teller work. Results from factor analysis identified seven factors that are indicative of the tellers’ emotional exhaustion, and four factors that are indicative of their job satisfaction. Results from correlation and regression analyses showed that a rise in the tellers’ emotional exhaustion reduces their satisfaction with the teller job. It is concluded that tellers become emotionally exhausted and dissatisfied with their jobs due to the absence of human resources management mechanisms that could have enabled the efficient design of the teller task and work environments that are conducive with bonded relationships between tellers’ and their supervisors.

  • 64. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Nugble, Juliet
    University of Ghana Business School, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
    Welders’ knowledge of personal protective equipment usage and occupational hazards awareness in the ghanaian informal auto-mechanic industrial sector2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Owusu-Asiedu, Emmanuel
    University of Ghana Business School, Legon, Accra.
    The Emerging Cognitive Difficulties and Emotional-Motivational Challenges of Ghanaian Air Traffic Controllers: Implication for Improved Job Design2017In: Advances in Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering: Proceedings of the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering, July 17–21, 2017, The Westin Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles, California, USA / [ed] Carryl Baldwin, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 351-361Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the cognitive difficulties and emotional-motivational challenges associated with air traffic control activity in Ghana. This based on the observation that air traffic controllers at the main airport in Ghana operate under very stressful situations in managing the high traffic and movement of aircrafts. Guided by the systemic structural theory of activity, it was found that the air traffic control activity entailed a complex set of tasks that required operators to have very high levels of knowledge and expertise in the practical application of specific skills pertaining to cognitive domains. It is concluded that even though a complex motor task in the air traffic control activity can be performed by the workers, it demands significant cognitive effort, with consequential effect on the emotional-motivational aspects of the activity they perform. This understanding can be incorporated in designing an operator-efficient and effective work system for air traffic controllers in Ghana.

  • 66.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sackey, Jocelyn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Unmasking the sociocultural constraints to career growth of married women in Ghanian organizations2010In: Advancing Women in Leadership, ISSN 1093-7099, E-ISSN 1093-7099, Vol. 30, no 22, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the question of how culture and activity can be explored towards understanding the professional career development of married women and the relative constraints associated with such development in the Ghanaian environment. Guided by the cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) framework, data was collected from a sample of 141 married Ghanaian women professionals engaged in white collar jobs in the public and private institutions located in Accra. It is established that the acceptance by the Ghanaian traditional society of the married professional woman as a capable person who can equally perform in an organization and thus need to be trusted, supported and recognized is of relevance to her career development. This observation provides learning on the impact of the inflow of socio-cultural dynamics into a gender-oriented organizational life and the complexities that it generates in understanding the constraints to the professional career development of married women. Keywords: Sociocultural constraints; professional married woman; career growth; organizational culture; organizational constraints

  • 67.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Sackey, Jocelyn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Managerial competence and non-performance of small firms in a developing economy2011In: International Journal of Contemporary Business Studies, ISSN 2156-7506, E-ISSN 2156-7506, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 6-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Executives of small firms in developing economies have the competences to make their firms competitive. Their inability to use their competences to simultaneously attain efficiency and effectiveness in managing their workplaces render them noncompetitive. This observation is made following a study that examines the competence challenges of executives of small firms and their non-performance in the Ghanaian industrial environment. Data were collected by surveying 72 executives using questionnaires. The result shows that executives of small firms in Ghana possess the managerial competences and behaviors to enhance the performances of their firms. The executives show a high level of autonomy and influence on the work they manage by appreciably combining their operant competences and their organizational citizenship behaviors. Yet still, despite the executives exhibiting competence and organizational behavior attributes, these characteristics appear not to have positive impacts on their performances toward making their firms competitive. For the executives to be efficient, they should have the capability to use their managerial competences for conducting research optimally (i.e., without wastage) in order to achieve organizational goals. Also, for executives to be effective, they should have the capability to use their requisite competences in carrying out research to complement their other managerial competences toward attaining the firm’s set goals.

  • 68.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sraha, Yeboah
    University of Ghana, Business School.
    Leadership in influencing and managing change in Ghanaian non-bank firms2011In: International Journal of Business Administration, ISSN 1923-4007, E-ISSN 1923-4015, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors driving changes in the Ghanaian non-bank financial institutions and the roles of leaders in influencing organizational changes in Ghanaian non-bank financial institutions. The findings indicated that leaders are expected to create shared vision, put in place a plan, set strategy and deploy appropriate leadership styles that will inspire confidence in the workforce necessary to achieve set goals. It was found that leaders are not involving their workforce in the decision making process and their contributions were not valued as well. It is concluded that in order to achieve the full benefits of change, leaders create a shared vision and provide the strategies that will achieve results and at the same time galvanize the energies of the workforce towards a common goal.

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