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  • 51.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Philip Pullman2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 58-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Reading Multilingual Literature: The Bilingual Brain and Literacy Education2013In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 22-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the child reading the literatures discussed in the other articles in this special issue of Bookbird. More specifically, it focuses on how the bilingual brain differs from the monolingual brain, and provides a general overview of those areas of difference that relate to reading. I conclude with a brief discussion of the implications of these differences for literacy development and education, paying particular attention to the place for multilingual literatures within literacy development.

  • 53.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Renate Habinger2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 11-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Rotraut Susanne Berner2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 27-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Satoshi Kako2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 35-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Seong-Chan Hong2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 37-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Simplified Minds: Empathy and Mind-Reading in Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance Cycle2017In: Affect, Emotion, and Children’s Literature: Representation and Socialization in Texts for Children and Young Adults / [ed] Elizabeth Bullen, Kristine Moruzi and Michelle Smith, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 96-112Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theory of Mind or mind-reading, that is, our ability to accurately assess what another person is thinking and feeling and to anticipate how they may respond as a result is a life skill which can be developed by reading fiction. Fiction allows readers to gain direct insights into the thoughts, feelings and motivations of complex characters. In addition to developing the readers’ mind-reading skills, mind-reading is an activity which appears in many works of fiction, especially fantasy, where magical means enable authors to create varying degrees on insight into the minds of others. This chapter begins with Simon Baron-Cohen proposal that we exist along a bell-curve of empathy: most people cluster at the centre with autistic persons towards the negative end and highly empathetic persons at the upper end. Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance-cycle is then used to illustrate Baron-Cohen’s research, as it places key characters along the bell-curve. These characters all have magical powers, and their non-human dimensions enable Paolini to map the limits of empathy, demonstrating the dangers of both a lack of empathy and hyper-empathy. In doing so, Paolini enables readers to explore the limits of empathy. The chapter concludes by considering how Paolini manipulates the readers’ empathy, encouraging them to admire behaviours they are likely to condone in real life.

  • 58.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Sinikka and Tiina Nopola2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 22-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Sun-Mi Hwang2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 36-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The Carnal Cravings of the Crone in Margo Lanaga's Tender Morsels2012In: Till en evakuerad igelkott: festskrift till Maria Nikolajeva, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2012, p. 63-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The Embodied Child: An Introduction2017In: The Embodied Child : Readings in Children’s Literature and Culture / [ed] Roxanne harde, Lydia Kokkola, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The Hedgehog and the ChiLPA Team2012In: Till en evakuerad igelkott: festskrift till Maria Nikolajeva, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2012, p. 99-72Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 63.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The Mighty Child: Time and Power in Children's Literature. Clémentine Beauvais. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015. 209 pages2015In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 207-209Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The "preposterousness" of John Burningham: complexity made accessible2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 56-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The Queer Art of Failure by Judith Halberstam2014In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 87-88Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Tonke Dragt2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 39-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Twenty-First-Century Feminisms in Children's and Adolescent Literature2019In: Children's Literature, ISSN 0092-8208, E-ISSN 1543-3374, Vol. 47, p. 253-238Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Virginity in Young Adult Literature After Twilight. Christine Seifert. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015. 157 pages. $60.00 (hardback).2015In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Virpi Talvitie2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 23-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Why I no longer work with Holocaust Literature2016In: Religious Studies and Theology, ISSN 0829-2922, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This vividly written reflection on research content, dissemination of knowledge, the researcher’s selfhood and ethical choices at a career point at which the author’s work is highly recognized and speaking invitations abound is a personal account of her decision to leave the field of Holocaust studies. Kokkola explains how she used elements from her own life story to find the empathy needed to engage with the research material, whilst highlighting the dangers of drawing such parallels. She concludes by exposing how the Holocaust has been leveraged for political and economic purposes to negate the other genocides and to promote a simplified view of saviour nations and idealized victims.

  • 71.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Harde, Roxanne
    University of Alberta.
    Editorial2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 3-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Harde, Roxanne
    University of Alberta.
    Editorial2012In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 3-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Harde, Roxanne
    Augustana Faculty, University of Alberta.
    Glad to be 100: The Making of a Children’s Classic2014In: Eleanor H. Porter’s Pollyanna: A Classic at 100, Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2014, p. 3-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Palo, Annbritt
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Manderstedt, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Protest and Apology in the Arctic: Enacting Citizenship in Two Recent Swedish Films2019In: Humanities, ISSN 2076-0787, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, Sweden enjoys a positive international reputation for its commitment to human rights issues, for instance, in relation to the recent migrant crisis. Abuses committed by the Swedish state against certain ethnic groups within the country are less well known, both within and beyond its borders. These included systematic attempts to curtail the use of indigenous and local languages, thereby causing communicative and ideological rifts between children and their parents. These policies were enacted through the school system from the 1920s until the 1970s, and particularly affected people living in the Arctic region where the national borders are disputed. In this article, we examine two twenty-first-century films set during this era, featuring feisty female characters responding to the school policy. Elina: As though I wasn’t there is a children’s film created by people “outside” the cultural group represented; and Sámi Blood features an adolescent protagonist (and her older self), created by “insiders” of the cultural group represented. In both films, the female protagonists’ relative lack of agency within the state school system is contrasted with their powerful connections to the Arctic landscape. We seek to examine how these films contribute to the work of apology, beginning with a public acknowledgement of the wrongs of the past. Whilst one of the films concludes with a celebration of the female protagonists’ agency, the other proffers a more ambiguous portrayal of power in relation to culture, nationality, and identity.

  • 75.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Valovirta, Elina
    The University of Turku.
    The Disgust that Fascinates: Sibling Incest as a Bad Romance2017In: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 121-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares the discourse of sibling incest evident in a corpus offiction with the discourse found in clinical, sociological and criminal literature.Whereas the former prima rily regards the coupling as a bad romance, the latterpresents the idea that it is unequivocally harmful. This discrepancy between the twodiscourses surrounding sexual relationships between brothers and sisters speaks toliterary fiction’s need for thwarted romances for the purposes of the literary market.A more detailed look into three novels from the corpus, Tabitha Suzuma’s For-bidden (2010), Donna Tartt’s The Secret History (1992) and Pauline Melville’s TheVentriloquist’s Tale (1997) shows how this logic of sibling incest as a bad romanceworks in practice.

  • 76.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Valovirta, Elina
    University of Turku.
    Korkka, Janne
    University of Turku.
    "Who Does What to Whom and How": "Knowing Children" and Depictions of Prostitution in Anglophone Young Adult Literature2013In: Children's Literature Association Quarterly, ISSN 0885-0429, E-ISSN 1553-1201, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 66-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Öqvist, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Gardelli, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lindström, Lisbeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Improving learning outcomes in the Swedish school system2018In: Addressing Societal Challenges / [ed] Editors Johan Frishammar Åsa Ericson, Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2018, p. 53-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack lustre performance of Swedish compulsory schoolsover the past few decades does not need to define its future.As this report will show, the main challenges facing the Swedisheducation system do not stem from a lack of resources.The effective implementation of research based innovationsand improvements in organization could tackle many of thesystemic weaknesses in the education system, thereby ensuringa brighter future. By addressing existing difficulties in theteaching and delivery of the curriculum and ensuring pupilswho are at risk are able to flourish, learning outcomes will beimproved. This, in turn, will reduce inequality, thereby improvingthe life-opportunities of young people and maintaining thehigh standard of living enjoyed in Sweden.

  • 78.
    Korkka, Janne
    et al.
    University of Turku.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Valovirta, Elina
    University of Turku.
    “An autobiography in which I do not appear”: The seductive self in the poetry of Robert Kroetsch2016In: English Studies: A Journal of English Language, ISSN 0013-838X, E-ISSN 1744-4217, Vol. 97, no 5, p. 510-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses selected works by the Western Canadian writer Robert Kroetsch (1927–2011) within the context of the biography battles which peaked during the 1990s. Kroetsch played a critical role in the formation and honing of a distinctive Prairie literary tradition in Canada, and we discuss a series of his poetic and other works published from the 1970s to 2010 which resonate with concerns raised within life-writing and life-writing criticism in the nineties. We focus on the almost obsessive concern with the relationships between self and other, and the seemingly contradictory denial of a stable self which mark the life writing debate of the decade; both evident in all of Kroetsch's writing. Raising the relation between space and selfhood to the fore, the article argues that Kroetsch's work not only questions our ability to know another through writing, but even to know the self. At the same time, we argue that the glimpses of a seemingly stable, autobiographical self that emerge in his writings speak to the seductiveness of gaining insights into the machinations of another person's mind, tempting Kroetsch again and again to ponder writing “an autobiography in which I do not appear”.

  • 79.
    Valovirta, Elina
    et al.
    University of Turku.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Pohdintoja väitlöskirjaohjauksesta: Avoin Dialogi2012In: Naistutkimuslehti, Vol. 2, p. 32-37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Valovirta, Elina
    et al.
    University of Turku.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Korkka, Janne
    University of Turku.
    The Smell of an Impossible Dream: Dallas, Migration and Failure in Angie Cruz’s Let It Rain Coffee2014In: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, ISSN 0021-9894, E-ISSN 1741-6442, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 229-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Latin Caribbean (forced) migration experience is in the centre of Angie Cruz’s 2005 novel, Let It Rain Coffee, which depicts the life and history of the Colón family in three different time periods (the early 1920s, the 1960s and the 1990s) in the Dominican Republic as well as in New York City. This paper focuses on the early nineties immigrant experience of Esperanza Colón, whose addiction to the television show Dallas becomes illustrative of a cultural identity formed by the ideal of the American Dream and mass culture. Although Esperanza fails to live up to the impossible standards she has set herself, the novel’s presentation of failure as a creative activity (as envisioned by Halberstam) challenges the hegemony of capitalism and globalization. Instead of reading the novel in terms of the two extremes of success or failure which typically characterise migrant narratives (Pearce), we focus on Esperanza’s “middle ranges of agency” (Sedgwick) to show how the commonplace terms in which migration is often presented fail to capture the nuances of immigrant experience at odds with the promise of the metropolis as negotiated by Cruz in the novel.

  • 81.
    Yarova, Aliona
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Beyond Human: Escaping the Maze of Anthropocentrism in Peter Dickinson’s Eva2015In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 38-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Images of human-animal-machine mergers – “cyborgs” in Donna Haraway’s terminology – are ways of exploring the human/non-human dichotomy and embracing non-human features as empowering: the cyborg supposedly enables humans to achieve their full potential by going beyond anthropocentric boundaries. Alternatively, the cyborg may not result in the empowerment of humans; on the contrary, it may lead to the complete loss of humanity. This article examines the interior conflict of the cyborg-protagonist in Peter Dickinson’s Eva (1988). Eva is subjected to life-saving experimental surgery during which her mind is transplanted into the body of a chimpanzee, and speak only by using a keyboard. Eva-the-cyborg explores the limits of human identity. Although she is expected to move beyond her human identity, perspective and body, Eva rejects these assumptions. Drawing on Judith Halberstam’s notion of “queer failure” (2011), this article argues that Eva’s failure to achieve a balance between her human and non-human selves is a creative act which defeats humankind’s daring attempt to control the universe using scientific and technological achievements.

  • 82.
    Österlund, Maria
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Celebrating the Margins: Families and Gender in the Work of the Swedish Picturebook Artist Pija Lindenbaum2014In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 77-82Article in journal (Refereed)
12 51 - 82 of 82
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