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  • 51.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Högtemperaturtorkning av byggnadsvirke1990Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 52.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Konditionering av furuvirke i samband med artificiell torkning1987Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 53.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Vidaretorkning av furu: analys av torkningsskador1989Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 54.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 10, Gran, modell 2, våttemperatur 50oC1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 55.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 11, Gran, modell 3, våttemperatur 40oC1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 56.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 12, Gran, modell 3, våttemperatur 45oC1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 57.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 13, Gran, modell 3, våttemperatur 50oC1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 58.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 2, Furu, modell 2, våttemperatur 40°C1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 59.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 3, Furu, modell 2, våttemperatur 45°C1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 60.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 4, Furu, modell 2, våttemperatur 50° C1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 61.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 5, Furu, modell 3, våttemperatur 40°C1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 62.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 6, Furu, modell 3, våttemperatur 45°C1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 63.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 7, Furu, modell 3, våttemperatur 50oC1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 64.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 8, Gran, modell 2, våttemperatur 40oC1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 65.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: D. 9, Gran, modell 2, våttemperatur 45oC1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 66.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Malmqvist, Lars
    Torkningsschema: Del 1 Teori, BASIC-program1984Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 67.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Winberg, Pär
    Virkestorkningens grunder2004 (oppl. 2.)Bok (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 68.
    Morén, Tom
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Wiberg, Pär
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    CT-scanning during drying2000Inngår i: Forests and society [electronic resource] : the role of research: [proceedings], XXI IUFRO World Congress 2000, 7-12 August 2000, Kuala Lumpur / [ed] Baskaran Krishnapillay, Kuala Lumpur: XXI IUFRO World congress organising committee , 2000Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 69. Scheepers, G.
    et al.
    Danvind, Jonas
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Rypstra, T.
    An investigation of fluid water movement in birch during drying through variation of wood sap surface tension and initial average moisture2005Inngår i: Proceedings: 9th International IUFRO Wood Drying Conference, Nanjing Forestry University , 2005Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 70.
    Scheepers, Gerhard
    et al.
    University of Stellenbosch.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Rypstra, Tim
    University of Stellenbosch.
    Liquid water flow in Pinus radiata during drying2007Inngår i: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 65, nr 4, s. 275-283Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    End-sealed 60×60×250 mm3 Pinus radiata pieces were dried at 65/37 °C (dry bulb/wet bulb temperature) and 4 ms-1 air speed to study various drying phenomena above fibre saturation point. While drying, an X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner captured a cross-cut density image every ten minutes. The density data was used to determine moisture content, rate of moisture loss from the core, wetline (boundary line of the free water region) depth and cross-cut area of the wood pieces. Repeating patterns were observed, which indicated that the cavity-size distribution of the wood pieces dictated fluctuations in the rate of moisture loss from the core and cross-cut area shrinkage during drying in the free water phase. It is hypothesised that, while drying an interconnected capillary network in the free water phase, the largest meniscus penetrates a wood piece through the largest cavities, thus also allowing air into the capillary network. The largest meniscus would always get smaller as it penetrates the wood piece until it is not the largest meniscus in the network anymore. Then the new largest meniscus would start penetrating the capillary network, etc. The largest meniscus would also determine the liquid tension in the capillary network. When the largest meniscus gets small enough, and the liquid tension strong enough, deformation and collapse of the remaining liquid-filled cavities can occur. A large liquid-filled interconnected capillary network would eventually fragment into a number of smaller liquid-filled interconnected networks, at which point a receding wetline could be observed.

  • 71.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Johansson, Dennis
    Morén, Tom
    Absorption of liquid water in pine, birch and spruce and the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure2006Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat-treated and matched boards dried at 60°C of Scots pine (Pinus silvestris), Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Birch (Betula pubescens) were submerged into water, allowing for water absorption in the longitudinal direction during two weeks in room climate. Heat treatment was performed according to the Thermo-wood process at 170°C and 200°C. Boards from pine and spruce boards contained both sap- and heartwood. During water absorption computer tomography scanning, CT-scanning, was performed intermittently in order to measure the ascent of capillary water. Longitudinal water absorption in heat-treated pine sapwood was substantial larger compared to untreated sapwood. In pine heartwood the ascent of water was low in heat-treated as well as in untreated boards. Spruce showed low water absorption in sap- and heartwood in heat-treated as well as in untreated boards. In birch the water absorption was lower in heat-treated wood compared to wood dried at 60°. SEM-studies of the anatomical microstructure, pits and pit membranes were performed on heat-treated as well as on untreated material. SEM-studies revealed damages in heat-treated and dried pine sapwood mainly in pit membranes in the fenestriform cross-field pits connecting longitudinal tracheids with radial ray parenchyma cells. These damages are believed to play an important role in explaining the differences in water absorption between pine and spruce since the piceoid cross field pits in spruce seemed to be unaffected by heat treatment. In birch no striking, visible observations were found when comparing the three different treatment temperatures that could shed light to the observed big difference in capillary water absorption.

  • 72.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknik.
    Johansson, Dennis
    Morén, Tom
    Effect of heat treatment on the microstructure of pine, spruce and birch and the influence on capillary absorption2006Inngår i: Wood structure and properties '06: [proceedings of the 5th IUFRO Symposium Wood Structure and Properties '06 held on September 3-6, 2006 in Sliač - Sielnica, Slovakia] / [ed] R. Lagana; S. Kurjatko; J. Kudela, Zvolen, Slovakia: Arbora Publishers , 2006, s. 373-379Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat-treated and matched boards of Scots pine (Pious sylvestris), Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Birch (Betula pubescens) were dried at 60 C and submerged into water, allowing for water absorption in the longitudinal direction during two weeks in an indoor climate. Heat treatment was performed according to the Thermo-Wood process at 170 degrees C and 200 degrees C. Boards from pine and spruce contained both sapwood and heartwood. During water absorption, computer tomography scanning (CT scanning) was performed intermittently in order to measure the ascent of capillary water. Longitudinal water absorption in heat-treated pine sapwood was substantially lamer than in untreated sapwood. In pine heartwood, the ascent of water was low in heat-treated as well as in untreated boards. Spruce showed low water absorption in sapwood and heartwood in heat-treated as well as in untreated boards. In birch, water absorption was lower in heat-treated wood than in wood dried at 60 degrees. SEM studies of the anatomical microstructure, the pits and pit membranes, were performed on heat-treated as well as on untreated material. SEM studies revealed damage in heat-treated and dried pine sapwood mainly in pit membranes in the fenestriform crossfield pits connecting longitudinal tracheids with radial ray parenchyma cells. This damage is believed to play an important role in explaining the differences in water absorption between pine and spruce, since the piceoid crossfield pits in spruce seemed to be unaffected by heat treatment. In comparing the three different treatment temperatures in birch, no striking, visible differences were found that could shed light on the observed large differences in capillary water absorption

  • 73.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Wamming, Thomas
    SP Träteknik.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Mold growth on sapwood boards exposed outdoors: the impact of wood drying2011Inngår i: Forest products journal, ISSN 0015-7473, Vol. 61, nr 2, s. 170-179Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Mold growth on dried Norway spruce and Scots pine sapwood boards was investigated in an accelerated outdoor field test for 96 days. The boards were dried using three different methods of stacking: single stacking, double stacking with the sapwood sides in each pair facing toward each other, and double stacking with sapwood sides facing outward. Drying was performed at three temperatures: 25ºC, corresponding to air drying, and kiln drying at 70ºC and 110ºC. The degree of mold growth was visually assessed on both sides of each board. On average, pine boards showed a higher level of mold growth than the spruce boards. The highest average level of mold growth was found on the boards kiln dried at 708C, whereas the air-dried boards and the boards kiln dried at 110ºC showed considerably less mold growth. Stacking the boards during drying had a large impact on mold susceptibility of the sapwood. This study confirmed that, during the drying process, it is possible to direct the migration of nutrients in sapwood toward one chosen side of each board by double stacking; the opposite side leaches out, which has a great impact on surface mold growth. Chemical analyses of monosaccharide sugar gradients beneath the boards’ surfaces confirmed the results.

  • 74.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Creep response to drying of timber boards of Scots pine1993Inngår i: Forest products journal, ISSN 0015-7473, Vol. 43, nr 10, s. 58-64Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 75.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknik.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknik.
    The Behaviour of Heat Treated Wooden Cladding Exposed to Extreme Climate Changes2010Inngår i: Proceedings of the 6th meeting of the Nordic-Baltic Network in Wood Material Science and Engineering (WSE): October 21-22, 2010, Tallinn, Estonia / [ed] Pille Meier, Tallinn: Tallinn University of Technology , 2010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat treated (HT) ThermoD and oil heat treated (OHT) samples were prepared for the test. ThermoD samples were prepared by treating wood with superheated steam and saturated steam. Oil heat treated samples were heat treated in oil under 180ºC and cooled directly in clean oil at the room temperature. During cooling the samples absorbed some oil. Untreated samples of pine, spruce and aspen were prepared as the reference samples.The material was tested for 5 cycles. Each cycle contained: soaking in water for 24 hours, direct freezing for 6 days and direct warming for 30 minutes. The tested species were pine, spruce and aspen. Water absorption depended on type of species and treatment. Pine had higher water absorption but after oil heat treatment had the lowest water absorption due to high oil contain. Spruce and aspen had approximately the same water absorption. Heat treatment reduced water absorption as it was expected. Samples degraded in colour more or less and some started to crack. Almost all untreated and ThermoD treated pine samples cracked. Spruce had the highest visible change of the colour after the test. Aspen showed the best results because the colour did not change significantly and the material did not crack. Oil heat treated samples of pine lost some oil after the test

  • 76.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Wooden material under extreme climate changes2010Inngår i: Proceedings, 11th International IUFRO Wood Drying Conference: [... in Skellefteå, Sweden, January 18 - 22, 2010 ... the theme of the conference was "Recent Advances in the Field of Wood Drying"] / [ed] Tom Morén; Lena Antti; Margot Sehlstedt-Persson, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2010, s. 269-271Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat treated (HT) ThermoD and untreated species were tested for the extreme climate changes. The experimental contained five cycles of soaking in water, freezing and warming. After experimental all samples degraded in colour more or less and some started to crack. ThermoD beech showed the best results. The colour did not change significantly and the material did not crack.

  • 77. Sundqvist, Bror
    et al.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    The influence of wood polymers and extractives on wood colour induced by hydrothermal treatment2002Inngår i: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 60, nr 5, s. 375-376Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A method to evaluate the influence of wood polymers and extractives on the color of wood subjected to hydrothermal treatment was proposed. As such, the technique used was extraction and color measurements. It was found that both degradation products from wood polymers and extractive compounds were indicated to be participating in the color formation of wood subjected to hydrothermal treatment.

  • 78. Thelandersson, Sven
    et al.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Tensile stresses and cracking in drying timber1992Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 79.
    Vikberg, Tommy
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknik.
    Mornén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknik.
    Internal Heat Exchange in Progressive Kilns2015Inngår i: Pro Ligno, ISSN 1841-4737, E-ISSN 2069-7430, Vol. 11, nr 4, s. 318-323Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work possible energy savings were investigated by introducing a new layout of a 2-zone progressive kiln. The layout consisted of installing a door between the first and second zone, thereby allowing the two zones to be run at different temperature levels -making internal heat recovery possible. An Optimized Two Stage continuous kiln is dimensioned for drying sideboard of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) with the aid of a commercial simulation program. Temperature levels of 75/55°C (dry bulb/wet bulb) were chosen at the pressure side of zone 1 and 45/25°C (dry bulb/wet bulb) at the pressure side of zone 2. The capacity of the heat exchanger was assumed to be sufficient to make the suggested design functional and no consideration was given to the increased air flow resistance the introduction of the heat exchanger would cause. The results indicated that roughly 30% of the heat is possible to recover in comparison to a traditional kiln. It was finally concluded that the influence of ingoing process parameters needs to be implemented in the kiln control system to fully utilize the kilns potential.

  • 80.
    Wiberg, P.
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Moisture flux determination in wood during drying above fibre saturation point using CT-scanning and digital image processing1999Inngår i: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 57, nr 2, s. 137-144Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Moisture flux in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Birch (Betula pubescens) was measured above fibre saturation point (FSP) using a computer tomography (CT) scanner and digital image processing. A test volume was selected in the interior part of the samples and the density changes were determined every 10 minutes. Two different drying schedules were used, which had two periods seperated by a climate step. Schedule I was conducted with constant dry bulb temperature and schedule II with constant wet bulb temperature. The climate in the first period, A, was equivalent to 16% equilibrium moisture content (EMC) and period B, 8% EMC. Tests with schedule I were run at 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C and 80 °C (dry bulb temperature) and with schedule II also at 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C and 80 °C (wet bulb temperature). The results showed that there was no difference between the moisture flux during period A from the test volume for the different species. Between the different temperatures no significant differences of the rate of density changes in the test volumes for the different species were found. Spruce reacted more slowly than pine and birch on the external climate step, but after a while the flux rate was equal to that for pine. Birch had a slightly lower flux, about 60% of the rate for pine and spruce in period B. The wood rays in softwood are probably the most important flow path. The different shape and size of the pits between the tracheids and the rays in pine and spruce may be one explanation why spruce reacted more slowly than pine.A receding front was also observed and, by image processing, the distance from the surface and the receding front were determined. The receding front was defined at a fixed density level, approx. 30 kg/m3 above FSP and it was assumed that the evaporation occurs at approximately the position of the receding front. The receding front took the position at 0.5-1 mm below the surface just after the beginning of the drying process. For pine and birch the distance from the surface to the front increased slowly, even after the climate step, but for spruce the distance to the front instantly increased to a new position. Spruce lost its liquid water at the edges first and after a few hours the distance to the front stabilized. At approximately 60% moisture content (MC) the liquid water continuity broke down and the drying entered the irreducible saturation phase. This transition phase is in between a heat transfer controlled phase of drying when liquid water moves with low resistance to an evaporation front and a diffusion-controlled phase below FSP.

  • 81. Wiberg, P.
    et al.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Morén, Tom
    Heat and mass transfer during sapwood drying above the fibre saturation point2000Inngår i: Drying Technology, ISSN 0737-3937, E-ISSN 1532-2300, Vol. 18, nr 8, s. 1647-1664Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Pine sapwood was dried in an air convection kiln at temperatures between 60-80 °C. Temperature and weight measurements were used to calculate the position of the evaporation front beneath the surface. It was assumed that the drying during a first regime is controlled by the heat transfer to the evaporation front until irreducible saturation occurs. Comparisons were made with CT-scanned density pictures of the dry shell formation during initial stages of drying of boards. The results indicate a receding evaporation front behaviour for sapwood above approximately 40-50% MC when the moisture flux is heat transfer controlled. After that we finally reach a period where bound water diffusion is assumed to control the drying rate. The heat transfer from the circulating air to the evaporation front controls the migration flux. In many industrial kilns the heating coils therefore have too small heat transfer rates for batches of thin boards and boards with high sapwood content.

  • 82. Yang, Qian
    et al.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Träteknologi.
    Dimensional stability and water repellency of european aspen improved by oxidized carbohydrates2013Inngår i: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 8, nr 1, s. 487-498Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Small samples from European aspen (Populus tremula L.) were impregnated with carbohydrates oxidized by Fenton’s reagent using water in a vacuum, followed by heating in an oven at 103°C. An antiswelling efficiency (ASE) of around 45% for wood treated with oxidized glucose and 35% for wood treated with oxidized sucrose was obtained. Samples treated with oxidized carbohydrates gave water repellent effectiveness (WRE) values over 35%. The decrease in cell wall thickness during impregnation was about 18% less in the presence of oxidized glucose than samples only treated with Fenton’s reagent. An ASE of 20% for the wood samples that had been treated with oxidized glucose was obtained after 7 days of soaking in water. The reasons for the improvement in dimensional stability are discussed in this work.

12 51 - 82 of 82
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