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  • 1.
    Lindström, John
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Hermanson, Anders
    Adage AB.
    Hellis, Mats
    Adage AB.
    Kyösti, Petter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Fastelaboratoriet.
    Optimizing recycling management using industrial internet supporting circular economy: a case study of an emerging IPS22017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 64, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper concerns a case study about optimizing recycling management in terms of emptying containers holding, for instance, glass, paper, plastics or metal waste collected, thus supporting sustainability of natural resources and the circular economy. The case has been followed from the very start all the way to the current transformation into an IPS2 sold on a subscription basis. The main results of the case study suggest that the provider side must change considerably in terms of the business and organizational set-up, which has been challenging compared to the necessary, though more easily implemented, technological changes. Further, the IPS2 customers foresee improved efficiency and a decrease in unnecessary work if containers are emptied on time. In addition, the core of the IPS2 seems generalizable and transferable to other applications where collection and analysis of data are needed to support decision-making.

  • 2.
    Lindström, John
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Hermansson, Anders
    Adage AB, C/O BnearIT.
    Blomstedt, Fredrik
    BnearIT AB.
    Kyösti, Petter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Fastelaboratoriet.
    A multi-usable cloud service platform: a case study on improved development pace and efficiency2018In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 8, no 2, article id 316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The case study, spanning three contexts, concerns a multi-usable cloud service platform for big data collection and analytics and how the development pace and efficiency of it has been improved 50-75% by using the Arrowhead framework and changing development processes/practices. Further, additional results captured during the case study are related to technology, competencies and skills, organization, management, infrastructure, and service and support. A conclusion is that when offering a complex offer such as an Industrial Product-Service System, comprising sensors, hardware, communications, software, cloud service platform, etc., it is necessary that the technology, business model, business set up and organization all go hand in hand during the development and later operation, as all “components” are required for a successful result.

  • 3.
    Lindström, John
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Källström, Elisabeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Kyösti, Petter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Fastelaboratoriet.
    Development and Operation of Functional Products: Improving knowledge on availability through use of monitoring and service related data2017In: Through-life Engineering Services / [ed] Redding, Louis, Roy, Rajkumar, Shaw, Andy, Springer International Publishing , 2017, p. 113-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The book chapter addresses which measures five manufacturing companies have taken, or plan to take, regarding use of data originating from monitoring, service, support, maintenance, repairs as well as other sources, in order to improve the knowledge on availability in the context of providing Functional Products. Commonly, the objective of Functional Products is to provide a function to customers with a specified level of availability (or improvement of productivity or efficiency). The results indicate that systematic planning and collection of relevant data, which is either pre-processed on-board (i.e., locally) or sent as is to central or cloud-based storage and processing, in combination with additional necessary data from other sources, is crucial to build knowledge in order to uphold and improve the level of availability agreed upon with customers. As the use of software in Functional Products increases, the knowledge on availability related to software must be augmented—which can be a challenge for many companies whose operations have been rooted in hardware. Further, the results reveal that getting high-quality input is key in order to use the collected data for analytics and to find root causes. The latter may change how the current value-chain operates and secures the quality of necessary data when providing functions to customers if partners are involved in the provider consortium.

  • 4.
    Reed, Sean
    et al.
    Resilience Engineering Research Group, University of Nottingham.
    Karlberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Kyösti, Petter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Fastelaboratoriet.
    Sas, Daria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Fastelaboratoriet.
    Quantified economic and environmental values through Functional Productization: A simulation approach2018In: Environmental impact assessment review, ISSN 0195-9255, E-ISSN 1873-6432, Vol. 70, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial companies rely on hardware and services from external providers to deliver functions that are critical to their operations, increasingly demanding solutions that not only meet technical and availability requirements but are sustainable too. Traditionally, industrial companies choose and purchase hardware and maintenance support to fulfil their functional requirements. An alternative arrangement, known as Functional Product (FP), involves external providers supplying customers with the functionality they require through contracts that specify guaranteed functional availability whilst giving providers freedom to choose and retain ownership of the supplied hardware and services. This paper describes an innovative simulation modelling and optimization approach to quantitatively compare economic and environmental values resulting from transition from traditional to FP arrangements. The approach is demonstrated through the analysis of a scenario involving a hydraulic drive system provider and set of customers in Sweden, with the results exhibiting simultaneous improvement in economic and environmental values at each stage of the transition.

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