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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Lööw, Joel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Segerstedt, Eugenia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Challenges in obtaining a social licence to mine2016In: AusIMM Bulletin, E-ISSN 1034-6775, Vol. 6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Lööw, Joel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Segerstedt, Eugenia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    How to Get a Social Licence to Mine2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to discuss socially sustainable development in the mining industry and the communities surrounding the mines. The discussions are based on results from a prestudy and literature review on mining and sustainable development conducted during 2013–2014 at Luleå University of Technology in Sweden. ‘A social licence to mine’ is important for the mining industry, but the social dimension is a relatively underdeveloped dimension when it comes to sustainable development in general and the mining industry in particular, one reason probably being the lack of effective methods for capturing social impacts. The mining industry and the surrounding communities face many challenges that provide both possibilities and obstacles to socially sustainable development; eg aspects such as gender, work conditions and cultural aspects. For example, a strong mining workplace culture and community identity can createstrong cohesion but also lead to excluding certain groups, rejecting new ideas and reinforcing obsolete values. Other challenges include recruitment, as well as health and safety in relation to an increased use of fly-in-fly-out, contractors and automation of mining. Some challenges relate to the effects of fluctuations in the mining market. There is a lack of research that links attitudes, policies and activities within companies to their impact on the wider community, and vice versa. Future research should also include the development of methods and indicators for social sustainability relevant for mining – in other words: how do mining companies get ‘a social licence to mine’?

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Segerstedt, Eugenia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Edman, Ida
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Åkerlund, Amanda
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mining and Sustainable Development: Gender, Diversity and Work Conditions in Mining2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish mining companies and surrounding mining communities face many challenges when it comes to social sustainable development. For example, a strong mining workplace culture and community identity can create both strong cohesion but also lead to exclusion of certain groups, rejection of new ideas and reinforce traditional, masculine values. Other challenges include recruitment, as well as health and safety in relation to an increased use of contractors and automation of mining. The social dimension is relatively underdeveloped in studies of sustainable development in general and the mining industry in particular. This report reviews research on social sustainable development and mining with a special focus on (1) diversity of lifestyles, (2) gender, and (3) work conditions. Swedish and international research is reviewed and knowledge gaps are identified. All three areas of research can be regarded as relatively mature and they give important contributions to ourunderstanding of social sustainable development in relation to the mining sector even if they not always explicitly refer to it as such. There is a lack of research that links attitudes, policies and activities within companies to their impact on the wider society, and vice versa. Future research should also include the development of methods and indicators for social sustainability relevant for mining.

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  • 4.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Samuelson, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    A Post-Analysis of the Introduction of the EU Directive 92/57/EEC in the Swedish Construction Industry2022In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 10, article id 1765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EU directive 92/57/EEC focuses on ensuring that health and safety-related matters are taken into consideration during every stage of construction-related work and has been introduced into the regulations of the member countries. In 2006, Sweden was tasked by the European Commission to clarify its implementation of the directive, including which management roles and responsibilities were to come into effect during both the planning and eventual execution of construction work—changes that ultimately were introduced into the national regulations in 2009. Focusing on the accident trends in the construction industry in the years immediately following these regulatory changes, we find that the new management roles and responsibilities had no apparent effect on the accident rates. Furthermore, we argue that there is a need to broaden the analysis regarding the implementation of the EU directive 92/57/EEC to also include nation-specific changes to health and safety management and policy. These qualitative studies should also include a dedicated focus on how changes to management structures and processes may affect the prevalence of occupational diseases specifically.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Byggindustrins säkerhetspark - ett program för säkerhetskultur: Delrapport 1: Säkerhetskulturforskning inom byggindustrin2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is a literature review of international research focusing on safety culture and safety management practices in the construction industry. More specifically, we discuss how the term “safety culture” can be understood in relation to the broader term “organizational culture” and that there is an intimate connection between the two. Furthermore, we conclude that much of the research takes a normative approach when studying safety culture in the sense of assuming that culture has a certain direction, i.e. that it aims at safety. It is less common that researchers take an interpretative perspective on safety culture where culture, in itself, is viewed as a complex phenomenon that cannot necessarily be controlled or managed in a certain direction. We argue that further studies in the field should also prioritize interpretative perspectives since it would contribute to a more nuanced view on safety culture, e.g., through qualitative methodological approaches such as ethnography. Finally, based on the results of previous research, we suggest a number of activities that can be introduced to the safety training park outside of Arlanda, Stockholm, as a way of strengthening their proactive safety work.

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  • 6.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Byggindustrins säkerhetspark - ett program för säkerhetskultur: Delrapport 2: Säkerhetsinitiativ och säkerhetskultur i svensk byggindustri2021Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 7.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Byggindustrins säkerhetspark – ett program för säkerhetskultur: Resultat och rekommendationer2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish construction industry has made major investments in recent years to raise awareness of the importance of working safely. Part of this effort is a safety park built by the Swedish Construction Federation and a number of construction companies, i.e. a facility where those who work in the industry are educated about safety and given the opportunity to jointly reflect on safety-related issues.

    Our research group at Luleå University of Technology has followed the park's establishment with the aim of investigating how issues concerning safety culture can and has been integrated into the safety park's activities. The project has been described in three reports. The first is a survey of international research in the field of safety culture, safety work and safety training (see “Safety culture research in the construction industry”, Berglund et al, 2020). The second report presents a survey and characterization of the safety initiatives and safety cultures that exist in Swedish construction companies (see “Safety initiatives and safety culture in the Swedish construction industry”, Berglund et al, 2021). In this third report, which we call Results and recommendations, we present an overall analysis of the park's activities and conclude with a number of proposals for how the safety park can be further developed. 

    In the report we can conclude that the safety park is in place and has been operating for just over three years. The park consists of a large number of stations or scenarios in which different situations and work moments are reflected. A visit to the park begins indoors with an introduction where the visiting company is given an initial description of the park's content and purpose, and a number of issues are introduced and discussed. After that, the visit continues outdoors by visiting a selection of stations that are designed according to the park’s educational principle of "see, hear, do and reflect". The choice of stations visited is made in consultation with the supervisor and with the visiting company. The day ends in the same way as it began, indoors, with reflections on lessons learned, and discussions about what the participants should take home to their own company. The park also serves as a display of current developments in the industry, not least in terms of new tools, equipment and materials, all with a focus on improved work environment and safety. The safety park is mainly visited by construction companies and construction students, but also by representatives from other industries. We have interviewed key individuals in the construction industry about the park and most of them testify that their visit was rewarding. Our report concludes with eleven development areas that we believe can help make the already good operations at the safety park even better.

    1. Problematize prevailing safety cultures at more stations in the park.

    2. The educational model is good and can be utilized in more stations.

    3. All visits should have a clear and specific company profile.

    4. All visitors should have a task to perform when returning to the company.

    5. Stations must be up-to-date and reflect realistic situations.

    6. The safety park should be a centre for learning, development and innovation.

    7. The safety park can be a showroom for new technology and good equipment.

    8. Gender issues should be integrated into the work of the security park.

    9. The importance of management for safety culture should be emphasized more.

    10.The safety park can become a resource for training foreign workers.

    11. The safety park should follow up and document their experiences.

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  • 8.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Exploring safety culture research in the construction industry2023In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 549-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite numerous regulatory initiatives to improve health and safety in the construction industry, it still ranks as one of the most accident-prone industries worldwide. A dedicated focus on safety culture has been suggested as a complement to laws, regulations and management systems.

    OBJECTIVE: This article explores safety culture research conducted in the construction industry, with the aim to provide insight into the specific themes that tend to be in focus as well as what theoretical and methodological approaches that tend to be favored.

    METHODS: Searches in scientific databases were conducted twice. In a first attempt, searches resulted in 54 hits but only two articles fit the scope of the study. A revision of the search phrase resulted in 124 hits. Ultimately, 17 articles fit the scope of the study and were included. The content of the articles was analyzed and sorted thematically.

    RESULTS: The results show that four themes are prevalent in the existing literature: 1) unique challenges entail a need for situated applications, 2) models developed to operationalize safety culture, 3) measuring safety culture, and 4) safety management and leadership as key factors.

    CONCLUSION:Although research focusing on the construction industry has come to favor certain study designs and definitions of safety culture, further research may be enriched by broadening the theoretical and methodological perspectives. Specifically, researchers should conduct more in-depth qualitative studies that take the complexity of the industry into account, including the interpersonal relations between the actors involved.

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    fulltext
  • 9.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Safety culture development in the construction industry: The case of a safety park in Sweden2023In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e18679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of occupational accidents in the construction industry has necessitated a focus on proactive measures such as safety management programs. An example of this is safety parks, i.e. facilities where employees and managers from different construction companies can participate in site-specific activities and train in safety-related matters in a realistic context. Two specific focus areas are often present within these types of safety management programs: hands-on safety training and safety culture development as being within the purview of management. The purpose of this article is to investigate the developers’ intentions with the park in relation to safety culture development. Twenty interviews were conducted with experts in the area of health and safety. Results indicate that the safety park can contribute as a mirror for the companies own operations, with new information and knowledge of how work can be performed with safety being prioritized, to developing communication regarding safety-related matters, and finally the stations at the park may initiate a translation process as to how the lessons learned at the park can be applied to the participants’ own workplaces. All in all, the activities at the park can be said to be normative in nature, i.e. the developers seemingly have a desire to steer the safety culture development in a certain direction. There is a need for further research focusing on the concept of safety culture in these types of programs and, more broadly, in relation to its intended industry-wide effects.

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    fulltext
  • 10.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Samuelson, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Occupational accidents in Swedish construction trades2021In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 552-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to anazlye accidents occurring in the Swedish construction industry focusing specifically on the situation in the individual trades. The article includes all occupational accidents with at least one day of absence from work that were reported to the Swedish Social Insurance Agency for the year of 2016. The results, focusing on accident cause, injured body parts, as well as accidents per weekday, month and age, show that although the trades share commonalities regarding occupational accidents a number of trade-specific problem areas stand out. With this in mind, conclusions are drawn regarding the situation in each respective trade and suggestions are made for future studies focusing on accidents in construction industry trades.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Berglund, Leif
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Rask, Kjell
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Samuelson, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Occupational safety in the construction industry2019In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    The paper is a research review focusing on occupational safety in the construction industry.

    OBJECTIVE

    The purpose is to present research that highlights the areas of occupational safety and risks and to identify areas where research is lacking.

    METHODS

    326 articles from scientific journals, mainly covering the construction industry in Europe, Canada, USA, Australia and Japan have been studied. The findings are presented under 11 categories: accident statistics; individual factors; legislation and regulations; ethical considerations; risk management; leadership, management, organization; competence; safety design; cost-benefit calculations; programs and models; and technical solutions.

    RESULTS

    The research is dominated by initiatives from researchers and government authorities, while the construction industry only appears as the object for the research. There is a scarcity of research on integrated systems encompassing subcontractors, as well as a lack of research with sociological perspectives on accidents. Furthermore, only a few studies have applied a gender perspective on safety in construction, i.e. there is a need of further research in this particular area.

    CONCLUSIONS

    A range of initiatives have been taken to increase safety in the construction industry and the initiatives are mainly reported to be successful. There are some cultural differences, but basically researchers present similar results regardless of country.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Lööw, Joel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Attracting young people to the mining industry: six recommendations2018In: International Journal of Mining and Mineral Engineering, ISSN 1754-890X, E-ISSN 1754-8918, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 94-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present workforce in the mining industry is ageing, and mining companies have difficulties recruiting young people who are not particularly interested in working in the industry. Simultaneously, mining companies tend to rely on contractors that offer volume flexibility and expertise, often in a combination that is economically appealing. This makes recruitment and development of the whole of the mining workforce complex. To recruit the right workforce, mining companies and their contractors need to cooperate and improve their knowledge about both attractive and repelling work features so that they can make wiser strategic decisions based on facts. On the basis of a Swedish context, we discuss different aspects of attractive workplaces and summarise our 'lessons learned' in six recommendations dealing with general health and safety issues, work organisation, competence development, gender equality, social responsibility and outsourcing.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Berglund, Leif
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    The Changed Relations between the Construction Industry and Occupational Health Services2020In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 903-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    From the 1960s until the beginning of the 1990s, the construction industry in Sweden received support for health and safety issues from Bygghälsan, an Occupational Health Service (OHS) that targeted the construction industry. In the 1990s, a reorganization of the OHS changed the relations between the actors involved.

    OBJECTIVES:

    This study explores these changed relations between the construction industry and the “old” industry-specific Bygghälsan versus the relations with “new” external OHS.

    METHODS:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 interviewees from the construction industry and individuals involved in OHS which were transcribed and analyzed.

    RESULTS:

    The results suggest that OHS have changed towards a more general character instead of tailor-made services which has had a negative effect on the relations. Further, Bygghälsan was perceived as being a part of the construction industry while contemporary OHS providers were perceived as outsiders which further complicates building trustful relations.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The relation between the construction industry and Bygghälsan was perceived as better compared to the relations with the new companies providing external OHS. The main barrier to building better relations is the perception that contemporary OHS do not have the same knowledge about the construction industry as Bygghälsan.

  • 14.
    Lööw, Joel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Initiatives for increased safety in the Swedish mining industry: Studying 30 years of improved accident rates2019In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 117, p. 437-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates safety-related developments in the Swedish mining industry over a 30-year period, from the 1980s to the 2010s. It studies what may have contributed to lowering the accident frequency rates and improvement of safety more broadly in the industry. On this basis, interviews were conducted with informants from mining companies. This material was supplemented with a workshop with mining health and safety representatives and documents relating to the subject. The results are divided into four main themes, showing that from the 1980s and onwards, lowered rates and general safety improvements followed in the wake of technology development. This was complemented by a more direct focus on organisational aspects of safety beginning in the early 2000s. Still the effectiveness of the individual measures is not clear; while they theoretically have an effect, causality is hard to show. In other words, the improvements may not necessarily depend on the specifics of these initiatives. Given this, the article discusses the different initiatives in-depth, and gives suggestions for future research and industry action. This includes recommendations for approaching safety holistically and the development of new proactive indicators.

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  • 15.
    Lööw, Joel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Säkerhet i svensk gruvindustri: 30 år av sänkta olycksfallsfrekvenser - och den fortsatta vägen framåt2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we investigate the accident trend and safety initiatives within the Swedish mining industry during the past 30 years, and suggest focus areas to further increase workplace safety.

    The study has four parts. In the first part we investigate international research with focus on safety in the mining industry generally and accidents specifically. We also examine the question of measurability and safety indicators. In the second part, we analyse the statistics that are available through relevant statistics providers. The third part contains an interview study with representatives from two Swedish mining company that focused on the technical, organisational and structural changes and initiatives that may have contributed to the declining rate of accidents in the past 30 years. In the fourth part, we analyse the results and make suggestions for further focus-areas suitable for a main study. With this, we intend to lay the foundation for a roadmap for the mining industry’s future efforts to further improve the accident rate in the industry and to subsequently develop a proposal for a full-scale innovation project, where these issues are developed, concretised and analysed deeper.

    In the study, we clarify, through the use of both document and interview studies, the direct and indirect measures two different companies in the Swedish mining industry have implemented in order to reduce accident frequency. These studies provide an insight into how the direct (e.g. safety programmes) and indirect (e.g. automation) initiatives may have contributed to lower accident rates.

    An additional aspect that we cover is how the Swedish mining industry is described by public statistics, how these statistics can be used to e.g. evaluate the work environment and safety initiatives in further studies, as well as the degree to which these statistics can be used as an indicator for e.g. the working environment. This was investigated by examining the most relevant statistics providers: The Swedish Work Environment Authority, Statistics Sweden, SveMin, AFA Insurance, and the Geological Survey of Sweden.

    The results show that the accident rate within the Swedish mining industry has dropped significantly over the past 30 years and that this drop can be attributed to extensive changes in technology and requirements for systematic work environment management and new forms of organization. This applies to both investigated companies. The industry is still in need of evaluation of the relative impact of these changes as well as how the different factors have influenced each other. In the research, too, there is an obvious knowledge gap.

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  • 16.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Veckopendlingen i Malmfälten: Omfattning och förutsättningar i gruvindustrin2014Report (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 17.
    Nygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Jakobsson, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Andersson, Eira
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Safety and Multi-employer Worksites in High-risk Industries: An Overview2017In: Relations Industrielles - Industrial Relations, ISSN 0034-379X, E-ISSN 1703-8138, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 223-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, workplace safety in high-risk industries is explored in relation to outsourcing and multi-employer worksites. Relevant industries in this case are those that traditionally have been high-risk due to hazards in the physical work environment and the occurrence of unsafe work processes and practices, such as construction, mining and petroleum production. After conducting a comprehensive literature review, we compile a number of key terms and concepts that have been the subject of interest among researchers and divide them into three broad categories: 1- contract work characteristics; 2- structural/organizational factors and conditions; 3- cultural conditions. We conclude by discussing the results in terms of challenges for safety in these shared work settings as well as suggest directions for future research.

  • 18.
    Sundström, Erik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Safety Initiatives in Support of Safety Culture Development: Examples from Four Mining Organisations2023In: Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration, ISSN 2524-3462, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 1007-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having seen significant improvements to accident rates in the last 40 years, companies in the Swedish mining industry now show a greater focus on the development of safety cultures throughout their organisations and workplaces. However, there is a lack of research examining the different safety initiatives and strategies practiced in the industry today. This study explores the potential influence and consequences such initiatives may have on the development of safety cultures in the Swedish mining industry. Twelve interviews with experts on safety initiatives from four different Swedish mining organisations were conducted and analysed in a process based on qualitative thematic analysis to identify notable connections to safety culture development. The results of these interviews highlight proclivities in the implementation and use of safety initiatives such as subjects of focus, methods and desired effects. This enables the interpretation of the conceptualisation and methods for the development of safety culture in these organisations based on their approaches to safety development. We believe the results of this study can serve as support for discussions on safety culture development in the Swedish mining industry, and be of interest for international mining industries, in addition to approaches to research in this field. However, we also believe it is important to emphasise the opportunities to approach safety culture in mining from different perspectives than those common today.

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  • 19.
    Sundström, Erik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Understanding the mining safety research field: exploring safety measures and programs in international research2023In: International Journal of Mining and Mineral Engineering, ISSN 1754-890X, E-ISSN 1754-8918, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 315-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the risks inherent to mining workplaces, a variety of methods for improving safety have been explored in the mining industry research field. This article aims to provide an overview on the safety measures studied in this field to determine the subjects in focus and to identify potential gaps in the research field. 54 research articles focusing on safety measures in the international mining industry were reviewed through thematic analysis. Ten themes for safety measures were identified in the mining industry research field, with safety culture development and safe behaviours being the most common. With the scope of the research field and its gaps presented, the article discusses the implications of the rarity and commonness of certain themes and gives recommendations for future research. This includes recommending the exploration of different safety perspectives, socio-technical theory and neo-institutionalism.

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    fulltext
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