Change search
Refine search result
1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Activity: Bodies of Evidence: Fat Across Disciplines2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Activity: Clinical Trials on Trial, Health Action International (HAI) Europe Open Seminar 2008 in Berlin2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Aktivitet: Genus i norrsken2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Changing gendered divisions of labor in labor: fetal monitoring in Scandinavia2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Petra Jonvallen, from Luleá University of Technology in Sweden, gave a presentation of ethnographies she conducted surrounding two new technologies used in Scandinavian maternity wards. The technologies she investigated are called "STAN" and "Milou", and roughly speaking, they are used in maternity wards to monitor the mother's contractions and the fetus heartbeat throughout labor. The difference between these systems and similar systems used since the 70's, is that there are digital monitors placed in casual places, such as the lunch room and doctor/nurse break rooms. This new feature, allowed the doctors to monitor several patients at once in more casual places. When something was going wrong in the labor room, they could see it, and go to intervene in time.While these technologies seem ideal, their use led to some unexpected consequences. First, by having monitors outside of the patients rooms, this meant that doctors and midwives didn't need to spend as much time in the rooms with the to-be mothers to monitor their progress. In hospital terms, this made the doctors and midwives "more efficient" in the use of their time, but this pushed other duties usually performed by the midwives to the men, or soon-to-be fathers, that accompanied the soon-to-be mothers. These tasks include getting water or ice, massaging sore backs, and giving reassurance. Dr. Jonvallen also discussed how midwives are usually in charge of the "normal" births, while doctors were in charge of the abnormal or "pathological" births. Usually, when a normal birth started becoming suspicious or worrisome, the midwives would be in charge of contacting the doctors. Thus, the midwives were the point of negotiation between "natural" births and births that require surgical intervention. With "STAN" or "Milou", doctors began casually monitoring different soon-to-be mothers, and instead of waiting for a midwife's call, they would just intervene as they felt necessary. This point of negotiation, and part of the midwives duties, changed, for better or for worse.

  • 5.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Compliance revisited: pharmaceutical drug trials in the era of the contract research organization2009In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 347-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decade, the management of clinical trials of pharmaceuticals has become a veritable industry, as evidenced by the emergence and proliferation of contract research organizations (CROs) that co-ordinate and monitor trials. This article focuses on work performed by one CRO involved in the introduction of new software, modelled on industrial production processes, into clinical trial practices. It investigates how this new management technique relates to the work performed in the clinic to ensure that trial participants comply with the protocol. Using an analytical distinction between 'classical' management work and invisible work, the article contextualizes the meaning of compliance in the clinic and suggests that the work involved in producing compliance should be taken into consideration by those concerned with validity of trials, as clinical trials are put under private industrial management. The article builds on participant observation at a Swedish university hospital and interviews the nurses, dieticians, doctors and a software engineer, all part of a team involved in pharmaceutical drug trials on a potential obesity drug.

  • 6.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Det sociotekniska och det biologiskt naturliga i kontroversen om fosterövervakning under förlossning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    E-hälsa, samhälle och kön: ur ett kritiskt perspektiv2012In: E-hälsa: Innovationer, metoder, interventioner och perspektiv, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, p. 145-162Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Emotion work, abjection and foetal monitoring2010In: Technology and medical practice: blood, guts and machines, Farnham: Ashgate Publishing , 2010, p. 145-159Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Enacting fat in the obesity clinic2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Feminism, autonomy and the biomedicalization of childbirth: Reflections on tensions involved in the introduction of a new foetal monitor in Sweden2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    LTUs nya professorer i genus2008In: Genus i norrsken, ISSN 1654-7640, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Makt, kön och medicinteknisk utvärdering2010In: Genus i norrsken, ISSN 1654-7640, no 3/4, p. 11-14Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Monitoring what for whom?: some views on risks and authorative images in birthing practices2009In: Current strands of thought and work in progress at the division for Gender and Technology, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2009, p. 11-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Motstånd & Fantasi : Historien om F av Anna Wahl, Maud Eduards, Charlotte Holgersson, Pia Höök, Sophie Linghag och Malin Rönnblom2008In: Genus i norrsken, ISSN 1654-7640, Vol. 1, no 3-4, p. 25-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Naïve and newly debuted: configurations of the trial participant in phase II-III clinical trials2008In: Society for Social Studies of Science, European Association for the Study of Science and Technology , 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasingly large part of pharmaceutical testing is performed by contract research organisations (CROs). This development is a consequence of the pharmaceutical industry's need to speed up the trial process in order to get drugs out to the market quicker, as well as a result of tighter bureaucracy surrounding clinical trials. Tasks performed by CROs include faster screening and recruitment of test subjects, tasks that traditionally have been done by the clinics themselves. For Sweden and other European countries, such a change implies large scale privatisation of the work performed in clinical trials. This paper discusses the consequences of this privatisation for the configuration of trial participants.The paper focuses a few of these configurations through analysing the discourses of test subjects in and around contract research organizations as they emerge in one CROs promotional material, as well as in local newspapers' coverage of the company when it was established in a Swedish city in 2004. One of the tasks of the company, dealing with phase II-III trials, is to recruit "naïve" and "newly debuted" participants. This means finding individuals who fit the often narrow inclusion criteria for participating in the trial, but who do not (yet) know that they are "at risk". The multi-layered meanings of this terminology are discussed, and a potential consequence of the argumentation is investigated: a tendency that clinical trials are configured as part of prevention programmes on behalf of public health care practitioners. More broadly, the paper thus focuses how the biomedicalisation of health interrelate with drug testing practice/discourse; and health promotion and prevention initiatives.

  • 16.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Overcoming the abject: identifying with the woman while monitoring a foetus2007In: Ways of Knowing: 2007 Annual Meeting, October 11-13, Montreal, Canada, Society for Social Studies of Science , 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the concept of abjection (Grosz 1990) in relation to introducing new technological devices into birthing practice and draws from examples emanated from fieldwork performed in a Swedish university hospital birthing centre where a new foetal monitor is being introduced. Notions of the abject in relation to the birthing woman and the foetus respectively are investigated. The abject is further analyzed in relation to the work practices of midwives and doctors and situated in the delivery room and in the conference room where rounds take place. The argument put forward is that overcoming notions of the abject is done through the engagement in an often dramatic birthing process and the consequent identification with the birthing woman. How this relates to new technological devices in birthing is discussed.

  • 17.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Prevention as a side effect?: distributing trial participans in a pharmaceutical drug trial2010In: Health Promotion and Prevention Programmes in Practice: How patients' health practices are rationalised, reconceptualised and reorganised, Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2010, p. 83-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18. Jonvallen, Petra
    Producing pills, constructing obesity: intersections of research, industry and care in a clinical trial2004In: Medicine, health and society in Europe: trends and prospects : 15-17 December, Faculty of economics, University of Coimbra, ITEM , 2004, p. 96-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Recension av Man ska ju vara två: män och kärlekslängtan i norrländsk glesbygd av Lissa Nordin2007In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20. Jonvallen, Petra
    Research, care or just another market to exploit?2004In: Public proffs science, technology and democracy: 4S and EASST conference, Paris - 2004, August 25-28th, EASST , 2004, p. 733-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity drugs were subsidised by the Swedish state up until April 2001, when enor-mous increases in drug costs forced authorities to make priority lists. So called "life style drugs" such as drugs against obesity and impotence were taken off the subsidy list. Actors such as obesity researchers and public officials have since then debated over whether obesity should be seen as a health risk or a disease. This debate also resonates at a local obesity clinic/research department level where a dominant part of staff are involved in clinical trials on potential future obesity drugs. Framing overweight as a risk or disease respectively, reflects the sometimes differing inte-rests of obesity research, public health care and the pharmaceutical industry. In this paper, these obesity drug. In focus is the ways in which heterogeneous actors per-form boundary-work around two flexible objects central in clinical trial practice: the protocol and the participants. The paper describes the flexibility of the group of voluntary participants and the clinical protocol, where they are enrolled as tools for research, treatment or pharmaceutical production, in complex ways and depending on the situation.

  • 21.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sex differentiation and body fat: local biologies and gender transgressions2010In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 379-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how sex differentiation is invoked from body fat with a focus on how various monitoring devices participate in the construction of bodies. By using the concept of ‘local biologies', denoting the linkage of the body to place with its local physical and social conditions, it argues against the ‘one-size-fits-all' paradigm of modern medicine and critiques the mechanistic search for regularity in medical research. By looking at medical literature on obesity and how contemporary obesity researchers and clinicians link body fat to sex, local biologies of bodies in a Swedish obesity clinic are contrasted to the universal biologies represented in medical research. The article also provides empirical examples of how fat has the potential to undermine traditional sex and gender binaries.

  • 22. Jonvallen, Petra
    Testing pills, enacting obesity: the work of localizing tools in a clinical trial2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines tools and practices involved in a large scale and multi-sited clinical trial of a potential drug against obesity. Two tools are in focus: a clinical research protocol and a computer control system. The analysis is based on there being different ways in which the tools are localized in order for the work to flow smoothly and to produce reliable data. It does this through delineating different types of work performed: production tasks, classical managerial work, compliance work and the work of coordinating beliefs and goals. The study is based on interviews, observations and documentary analysis. Through describing these types of work and how it is organized, the study emphasizes the trial as being part of an industrial production process. Hence, the tools are used not only to produce reliable data, but also to manage the work of the tools' users in order to enable a smooth production process. In line with such a description, the protocol and computer control system are seen as objects that discipline practice, something that also resonates in the way staff talk about their work. The dissertation shows how the tools, despite this, leave room for aspects of clinical trial work that are both rational/technical and experiential/contingent. The dissertation also shows that obesity is enacted in different ways in the practices performed in the trial. Making sense of these somewhat contradictory enactments requires work referred to as coordination of beliefs about what obesity is, as well as of the different goals of the trial. By such a focus on invisible work, the dissertation shows that those nurses, dieticians and doctors involved in the everyday follow-through of the trial have a strategic position in mediating between pharmaceutical companies and their potential market for the drug under study, namely the trial participants.

  • 23. Jonvallen, Petra
    The making of pharmaceuticals and bodies: the case of obesity2003In: Gender and power in the new Europe: 5th European feminist research conference, Centre for gender studies, Lund university, Sweden 20-24 augusti 2003, Lund universitet, Centre for gender studies , 2003, p. 12-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24. Jonvallen, Petra
    Treating lifestyle diseases: medical science, health care and the evaluation of theapies against obesity2002In: Responsibility under uncertanity: EASST 2002, University of York 31st July - 3rd Aug 2002, EASST , 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Trust in the machine: Intrapartum fetal monitoring in Swedish birthing practices2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1970s, the predominant method of fetal monitoring during labour has been cardiotocography (CTG) which measures fetal heart rates. Recently, a new device has been introduced which adds an analysis of the fetus' echocardiogram (STAN) to the work of assessing the fetus' oxygen uptake during labour. The paper describes how the device becomes both a producer of safety while simultaneously creating an increased focus on potential risk. On the one hand there is scientific evidence that STAN provides better odds for a healthy outcome, yet it does so by shifting attention away from the woman-in-labour to the machine, which midwives find problematic. The paper investigates reconfigurations of midwives' trust in the new electronic fetal monitor in gauging the health of the fetus during labour. In so doing, it seeks to describe how this new device is involved in the construction and management of safety in the birth process. The paper builds on participant observation performed in 2006 at a Swedish birthing clinic where the device had recently been introduced, interviews with midwives working there, as well as analysis of a variety of documentary data concerning reported problems with the device.

  • 26.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Uthålligt jämställdhetsarbete på LTU: Petra Jonvallen intervjuar Luleå kommuns jämställdhetsstipendiat 20112011In: Genus i norrsken, ISSN 1654-7640, no 1-2, p. 19-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Women’s agency and the rhetoric of medical pluralism in Swedish birth and labour practices2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Barry, Jim
    The development of contract research organisations in Sweden: health care, privatisation and neo-liberalism2011In: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 196-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the role of Contract Research Organisations (CROs) in Swedish health care and pharmaceutical development. Before the recent rise of CROs - which are centrally placed between pharmaceutical companies, public sector health care organisations and test participants in an industry noted for its high financial turnover - recruitment of participants and management of clinical trials were undertaken by academic researchers. Things have changed. In the US, this new state of affairs has been argued to be the outcome of decreasing revenue for physicians and decreasing access to treatment for patients (Fisher 2009). This paper seeks to extend our understanding of the purpose and operation of CROs by reviewing existing literature (cf Mirowski and Van Horn 2005; Fisher 2009), comparing this with data on CROs in Sweden, and placing the study within its neo-liberal context marked as it is by notions of individualism, the politics of choice, self-responsibilisation, and risk. This will enable us explore the changes that CROs have brought to the interrelated practices and processes of risk reduction, prevention and health care in Sweden.

  • 29.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Wamala, Caroline
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Current strands of thought and work in progress at the division for Gender and Technology2009Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Lindholm, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Jonvallen, Petra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Steering for equal treatment?: the process of developing gender equal care plans in Swedish healthcare organizations2011Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf