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  • 1.
    Balindres, Anecito Reyes
    et al.
    University of Stavanger.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Markeset, Tore
    Centre for Industrial Asset Management, University of Stavanger, School of Science and Technology, Stavanger University College, Tromsø University, Center for Safe Operation in HIGH North, University of Tromsø.
    Effects of Arctic Conditions on Human Performance2016In: Advances in Physical Ergonomics and Human Factors: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference on Physical Ergonomics and Human Factors, July 27-31, 2016, Walt Disney World®, Florida, USA / [ed] Ravindra Goonetilleke; Waldemar Karwowski, London: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2016, p. 657-663Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern technologies are used to create competitive performance in industry, and highly specialized personnel are often needed to operate and maintain the technology. However, both the technology and the personnel are influenced by the environment in which the technologies are operated. In this paper we study how human performance is influenced by an Arctic environment in conjunction with a remote location. Based on a literature study, we map Arctic factors and study how they affect human performance in remote locations. The results show that operational and maintenance personnel may be significantly affected by the Arctic conditions. If not taken into consideration during the design phase, human and organizational performance may be significantly affected. Examples are discussed in relation to petroleum production in Arctic locations north of Norway

  • 2.
    Galar, Diego
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Stenström, Christer
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Parida, Aditya
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Berges, Luis
    University of Zaragoza.
    Human factor in maintenance performance measurement2011In: IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2011, p. 1569-1576Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maintenance performance measurement is often faced with a lack in knowledge about the real function of the maintenance department within organizations, and consequently the absence of appropriate targets emanating from the global mission and vision. These facts bring about metrics not adapted to the real needs, which has a strong load of human factor and without a roadmap of the amount of data to be collected, their processing and use in decision making. This article proposes a model where qualitative and quantitative methods are combined in order to complement advantages and disadvantages of them both.

  • 3.
    Hägg, Göran
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre of Musculoskeletal Research.
    Schmidt, Lisa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Reseach Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Lindbeck, Lars
    National Institute for Working Life.
    Öhrling, Therese
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Physical load in cleaning work: a review of strenuous work tasks2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An action program with the aim to reduce work injuries and disorders among Swedish cleaners is presently carried out. Several sub-projects are accomplished within the project frame. In this paper, findings in several sub-projects regarding physical work load in cleaning work are summarized. Main data collection methods have been VIDAR-filming, interviews and questionnaires. Supplementary EMG measurements, biomechanical analysis with computer models and systematic observations with the OWAS method have also been performed. In total 61 cleaners have been studied in different ways encompassing all major types of cleaning work. The results show very few single tasks exhibit loads that from a strict biomechanical standpoint are injurious when performed a few times while repetitive monotonous tasks and awkward body postures are very frequent. Common repetitive tasks seen in most types of cleaning are mopping and dusting/wiping of various surfaces, often in awkward postures. Other common strenuous tasks are making beds in hotels, trains and cruise ships, handling of waste baskets and bags, cleaning of toilets and bathrooms and cleaning of stairs. The loads in some of these tasks are unnecessarily high due to the use of obsolete equipment and methods. Organizational issues are also important factors determining the total load on cleaners. Thorough cleaning campaigns on top of daily routines and gradual downsizing of staff with unchanged duties are examples of such issues. Obstacles caused by architecture, interior design and choice of furniture are also causing strenuous tasks.

  • 4. Kumar, Rupesh
    Ergonomic assessment of two different cleaning tools while cleaning floor2002In: Third international cyberspace conference on ergonomics: CybErg 2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ergonomic evaluation and design of tools in cleaning occupation2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many work and environmental factors can affect the health of professional cleaners. In many of the work environments where cleaners are found the conditions that promote various occupational diseases (e.g., musculoskeletal disorders) are readily manageable. Inappropriate and poor working postures, lack of task variation, poor ergonomic design of work places, bad design of cleaning tools and work organization (e.g., long working hours, low salaries and awkward schedules) are all areas where relatively simple interventions can significantly reduce the rate of exposure to occupational disease. The primary goal of this research work was to study, existing cleaning work, cleaning tools, working environment and psychosocial aspects among professional cleaners. Seven different studies were carried out, these included a systematic literature review on risk factors in the cleaning occupation, redesign of cleaning tools, evaluation of cleaning tools, evaluation of working environment and psychosocial aspects of cleaners. The overall conclusion of presented studies is this thesis is that the cleaning job consists of high cardiovascular, muscular, and postural load. Using a participatory ergonomic approach and user-centered design, cleaning problems can be identified comprehensively and can be solved ergonomically, and cleaning tools can be redesigned considering ergonomic aspects by involving the end user. The strategy of participatory ergonomics in cleaning activities can significantly reduce work injuries, absenteeism, and compensation costs while at the same time lead to high quality of work and greater job satisfaction among the workforce.

  • 6. Kumar, Rupesh
    Evaluation of a Redesigned Cleaning Tool2002In: Proceedings of the XVI Annual International Occupational Ergonomics and Safety Conference, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 10-13 June 2002., 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cleaning is an important activity in day-to-day life as well as professional lives. It has positive effects on the productivity and quality of work. In this study, the cleaning process was studied and analysed with special reference to cleaning tools and the cleaning process. The traditional cleaning tool used by the professional cleaners for the passenger trains in Lulea was redesigned

  • 7. Kumar, Rupesh
    Integrating ergonomic principles in the design and development of cleaning processes and tools2003Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many work and environmental factors can affect the health of professional cleaners In many of the work environments where cleaners are found the condition that promote various occupational diseases (e.g., musculoskeletal disorders) are readily manageable. Inappropriate and poor working postures, lack of task variation, poor ergonomic design of work places, bad design of cleaning tools and work organization (e.g., long working hours, low salaries and awkward schedules) are all areas where relatively simple interventions can dramatically reduce the rate of exposure to occupational disease. The objective of the studies reported on in this thesis were to study the cleaning process; along with cleaning tools typically used. A complimentary objective was to develop ergonomic processes that, when properly applied, were capable of improving health and product quality. This intervention strategy included design of cleaning tools in a small scale industry which manufacture manual cleaning tools and a tool/work organization intervention among professional cleaners. Six studies were carried out. These included an ergonomic workshop, redesign of cleaning tools, evaluation of cleaning tools, evaluation of improved working conditions and the development of ergonomic processes in an industrial setting. In Study I and II, participatory ergonomics approach was used to identify the problems associated with cleaning jobs and for the subsequent redesign of cleaning tools. Studies III and IV evaluated the use of cleaning tools in terms of oxygen consumption, heart rate, postural analysis, perceived exertion and biomechanical load in the trunk/torso region of the body. In Study V improved working conditions for the cleaners was evaluated within a frame work of postural analysis and perceived exertion. Finally, in Study VI a participatory ergonomic approach was used to enhance worker health, product quality and improve working conditions in an industrial environment. The focus of all studies reported is the assessment of the combined intervention strategies of participatory ergonomics and tool redesign. Results from Studies I and II and VI demonstrate that the involvement of workers through participatory ergonomics has a positive outcome through a greater involvement of workers in work processes. In Studies III IV and V the results demonstrated that awkward working postures caused by poor cleaning tool design and improper working environments/conditions can lead to high cardiovascular loading, excessive biomechanical stressors, extreme postural demands and worker perception that tasks demand relatively high exertion levels. Study VI that used the strategy of an ergonomic workshop did not have the desired positive outcome; time constraints imposed by management and insufficient advance orientation of employees appeared to be the primary reasons for the poor workshop outcome. Individual participation in ergonomic activities of workers at the same company was more positive in terms of identifying ergonomic problems and solutions. This did suggest that, when carefully managed, workshops and related ergonomic interventions can have a positive effect on a work environment. From the results of Studies I, II, and VI it can be concluded that participatory ergonomics is a useful ergonomic method in terms of identifying job related ergonomic problems and ergonomic solutions. The introduction of the participatory ergonomics approach was designed to encourage the use of participatory ergonomics in identifying problems and solutions. Typical participatory strategies that emerged were greater worker participation in tool re-design and in the restructuring of working conditions. Prior to the studies, participatory ergonomics was not in common use in the industries studies. Studies III, IV and V demonstrated that during a participatory ergonomic program, small changes in working environments and working tools can significantly reduce awkward working postures and thus improve worker comfort levels. The overall conclusion of the studies and this thesis is that the implementation of the strategy of participatory ergonomics into cleaning activities and small factories can significantly reduce work injuries, absenteeism, and compensation costs while at the same time lead to high quality of work and greater job satisfaction among a workforce.

  • 8.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Barabady, Javad
    Center for Safe Operation in HIGH North, University of Tromsø.
    Markeset, Tore I.
    Center for Safe Operation in HIGH North, University of Tromsø.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Improving maintainability in extreme cold climatic conditions2012In: International Journal of Pedagogy, Innovation and New Technologies, ISSN 0973-1318, E-ISSN 2392-0092, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 563-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maintainability issue is critical for the successful and effective operation of any industry in the extreme cold climatic conditions as the working conditions are made very difficult by low temperature, ice, short period of daylight and lack of support facilities. The objective of this paper is to identify potential risk factors in cold conditions and to provide ergonomic guidelines to reduce risk factors and increase maintainability of industries deployed in cold climate

  • 9.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Barabady, Javad
    Markeset, Tore
    Tromsø University.
    Kumar, Uday
    Improvement of performance of oil and gas production facilities in arctic regions by applying human factors/ergonomic principles at the design phase2009In: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions: June 9-12, 2009, Luleå, Sweden, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The system with a low level of reliability of being deployed in a cold climate often needs special and additional focus on maintainability characteristics in order to achieve the higher level of productivity, system availability and safety. Therefore, the maintainability issue is critical for the successful and effective operation of oil and gas installations in the Arctic environment as the working conditions are made very difficult by low temperature, ice, short period of daylight and lack of support facilities. Furthermore, the maintenance tasks or maintainability in the Arctic region is heavily influenced by the design of the task and the design of the equipment being maintained. The risk of human error in the Arctic environment is very high and about 80% of offshore accidents are caused by humans, with 64% occurring during operations. Morover, human factors/ergonomics is now recognized as a major contributor to operational safety, loss prevention and optimizing system performance in the oil and gas industries. Therefore, the study of human factor and reliability is essential to ensure the safe and reliable operation of industrial plant and systems which involve human operators. Human factors' integration aims to 'design-in' the humans into plant and system design, taking account of their capabilities and limitations. This can lead to significant savings through appropriate manning levels, maintainable plant, reduced rework and user-friendly facilities and systems.The objective of this paper is to explore potential risk factors especially in Arctic conditions with a view to how human factors/ergonomic principles can help to reduce risk factors and increase maintainability of the oil and gas industry. In this paper, the starting point is the offshore oil and gas industry, but the methodology and discussion are to a large extent general and could also be applied in the other industries.

  • 10. Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Chaikumarn, Montakarn
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Evaluation of Cleaning Postures in Different Working Environments2004In: Building Bridges for Healthy Workplaces: Proceedings of the XVIII Annual International Occupational Ergonomics and Safety Conference, Houston, Texas, May 19-22, 2004 / [ed] L.J.H. Schultze, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cleaning is considered to be a highly physically demanding job, of which high cardiovascular load, high frequency of awkward postures, and unpleasant working environments are common features. The aim of this study was to analyze cleaning postures in an office working environment with two different scenarios, one with electric and computer cables on the floor and one without. Ten healthy professional cleaners participated in this study. The OWAS method and rating of perceived exertion using the Borg scale were used in the analysis. Results show that in an improved working environment the total working time for floor mopping reduced from 36% to 33%. Results also indicated that in an improved working environment the working postures while floor mopping did not fall into OWAS categories 3 and 4. While mopping floor with cables on the floor, the working postures fell into categories 4 and 3. The cleaners rated floor mopping with cables on the floor to be more strenuous on the Borg scale than mopping the floor without cables sprawled over it. It can be concluded from the study that working in an improved environment can lead to better working postures which, in turn, leads to a better health of cleaners

  • 11. Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Chaikumarn, Montakarn
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Kumar, Shrawan
    University of Alberta.
    Physiological, subjective and postural loads in passenger train wagon cleaning using a conventional and redesigned cleaning tool2005In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 931-938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods: In this study, cleaning process was studied and analyzed with special reference to cleaning tools. A group of 13 professional cleaners participated in this study. While they performed their normal tasks, their oxygen consumption, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion and postural data were obtained. The perceived exertion during cleaning task using the "redesigned cleaning tool" was less than that of the "conventional cleaning tool". The oxygen consumption when cleaning with the redesigned tool (mean 0.841/m, SD +/- 0.17) was significantly less (p < 0.05) compared to the conventional cleaning tool (mean 0.941/m, SD +/- 0. 18). Heart rate was also found significantly lower using redesigned cleaning tool (mean 101 bpm, SD +/- 11. 10) compared to that of conventional cleaning tool (mean 105 bpm, SD +/- 12.59) (p < 0.05). Using redesigned cleaning tool the trunk postural load was also found significantly less than that of conventional cleaning tool (p < 0.05). It is concluded that redesigned cleaning tool allowed cleaners to maintain more upright posture when cleaning, which reduced biomechanical load. Relevance for Industry: There is need to develop ergonomic criteria or recommendation to enable manufacturers of cleaning equipment to specify and evaluate usability qualities when formulating user requirements for new cleaning tools.

  • 12. Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Chaikumarn, Montakarn
    Lundberg, Jan
    Participatory ergonomics and an evaluation of a low-cost improvement effect on cleaners' working posture2005In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 203-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cleaning is a highly physically demanding job with a high frequency of awkward postures and working environments as contributing risk factors. Participatory ergonomics is a method in which end-users take an active role in identifying risk factors and solutions. The aim of this study was to apply the participatory ergonomics method to identify cleaning problems and to evaluate the effect of a low-cost improvement on cleaners' working postures in an office environment. The results show that the cleaning problem was identified, and the low-cost ergonomics solution suggested by the cleaners was implemented. Thus an improved working environment reduced the number of awkward cleaning postures and the Ovako Working Posture Analysis System (OWAS) action category for floor mopping decreased. It can be concluded that working in an improved environment can lead to better working postures which, in turn, leads to the cleaners' better health and better cleaning results.

  • 13. Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Hägg, Göran
    University of Gävle, Centre of Musculoskeletal Research.
    Öhrling, Therese
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Evaluation of muscular activity while mopping floor on two different types of floor2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cleaning occupations, about 80% of all cleaning tasks are done by manual cleaning tools, and about 30%-35% of working time is spent on mopping floors. Cleaning is considered as a physically demanding and strenuous job. This study examines the effects of mopping on polished and non-polished linoleum floors in school classrooms in terms of muscular activity and subjective awareness. Ten professional cleaners volunteered for this study and surface electromyography (sEMG) was recorded from six muscle groups; left and right wrist extensor, right and left anterior deltoid and right and left upper trapezius. The cleaners were randomly assigned a type of floor to be used in each test. The cleaners performed the mopping task for both polished and non-polished floors at their normal working rate. The results show no significant difference (p<0.05) in muscular activity while mopping on the polished floor compared to the non-polished floor; however, the cleaners rated the polished floor more comfortable to mop.

  • 14. Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Hägg, Göran
    University of Gävle, Centre of Musculoskeletal Research.
    Öhrling, Therese
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Muscular activity during staircase cleaning while using an easily adjustable and a non-adjustable mop stick2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional cleaners are known to experience considerable musculoskeletal problems due to the static muscular work that have to be maintained throughout their working period as well as those due to highly repetitive movements of the arms and hands. About 80% of the cleaning job is done with the manual cleaning tool. In this study, staircase cleaning was studied and analyzed with special focus on muscular load differences resulting from using an easily adjustable as opposed to a non-adjustable mop stick. Thirteen professional cleaners participated in this study. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was recorded from six muscle groups (left and right wrist extensor, right and left middle deltoid and right and left upper trapezius) while cleaners performed the staircase cleaning task at their normal pace for about five minutes using the easily adjustable and the non adjustable mop stick in random order. At the end of each test the cleaners rated their perceived exertion on the Borg scale (0-10) for the upper part of the body. The results showed significantly higher mean sEMG activity recorded from the right middle deltoid and right upper trapezius while using the non-adjustable stick as compared to the easily adjustable stick (p<0.05). sEMG activity from the left middle deltoid and left upper trapezius showed no significant difference as all participating cleaners were right handed. The cleaners rated less exertion in the upper body parts while using the adjustable mop stick compared to the non-adjustable mop stick. The adjustable stick was also found to be more comfortable to use. It is concluded that while using a non-adjustable mop stick cleaners were compelled to adopt their right hand arm in abducted position in order to steer the mop while cleaning the staircase

  • 15.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kumar, Shrawan
    University of Edmonton.
    A comparison of muscular activities involved in the use of two different types of computer mouse2008In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 305-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two types of computer input devices, a conventional mouse and a roller bar one, were studied in terms of muscular activitiy in m. trapezius dexter, m. deltoideus anterior dexter and m. extensor digitorum dexter, and comfort rating. Fifteen university students and employees participated in this study. The order of the devices was random. While a task was performed, electromyography (EMG) data were recorded for each test. Muscular activity was found to be significantly lower for the roller bar mouse than for the conventional one. Comfort rating indicated there was a significant difference in moving a cursor with the conventional mouse compared to the roller bar one. It is concluded that a roller bar mouse allowed the subjects to work closer to the body compared to the conventional one, thus the former can be recommended as a general means of reducing upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

  • 16.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kumar, Shrawan
    University of Alberta.
    Musculoskeletal risk factors in cleaning occupation: a literature review2008In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 158-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to present a systematic review of the literature in the field to identify problems, recommended practices, unresolved issues and explore occupational needs related to cleaning problems. Selected for review were published and unpublished reports dealing with musculoskeletal disorders among cleaners. English language summaries of other language articles were also included. The factor mentioned most often is that cleaning is associated with high physical and psychosocial workloads. Recommended ergonomic interventions were summarized in a model to present a systematic overview, useful for research and practical applications. A few studies concern equipment design, working environments and factors affecting individual workers. A need to conduct research on cleaning tools/equipment, working environments and individual risk factors is apparent. Relevance to industry:Ergonomic strategies and methods are not widely practiced in the cleaning profession. If ergonomic principles can be integrated into existing cleaning industry tools, methods and work environments then efficiencies can be realized and the risk of occupational injuries will be reduced. The work efficiency and injury reduction will reduce employer-operating costs.

  • 17. Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Service strategy for mining system2002In: MTM - 2002 Proceedings: International Seminar on Mining, Technology, and Management for Business Excellence, New Delhi, November 2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Markeset, Tore
    University of Stavanger.
    Barabady, Javad
    Tromsø University.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ergonomic issues at a railway maintenance workshop2011In: Proceedings of the 24th International Congress on Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis Engineering Management: COMADEM 2011 / [ed] Maneesh Singh; Raj B.K.N. Rao; J.P. Liyanage, COMADEM International, 2011, p. 1583-1587Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on human factors related to railway operation and maintenance has, to an extent, been the neglected branch of transport ergonomics. Despite the numerous reports of ergonomics programs in a variety of industries, no examples of implementing ergonomics interventions in the railway vehicle maintenance workshop have been reported.In this study, a maintenance process at a railway workshop was studied and analyzed with special reference to working posture and maintenance repair time. The working postures of two maintenance personnel were obtained and analyzed using OWAS (Ovako Working Posture Analysis System). From the results, it was clearly indicated that poor working posture was a frequent occurrence during the maintenance activities. It can be concluded that the introduction and implementation of ergonomics principles at the railway maintenance workshop must be considered in order to reduce the poor working postures, maintenance repair time and to improve maintainability and productivity.

  • 19.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Theorell, Töres
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Markeset, Tore
    Centre for Industrial Asset Management, University of Stavanger, School of Science and Technology, Stavanger University College, Tromsø University, Center for Safe Operation in HIGH North, University of Tromsø.
    Comparing Psychosocial Factors Associated with Job Stress Among Administrative Staff and Cleaners2016In: Advances in Physical Ergonomics and Human Factors: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference on Physical Ergonomics and Human Factors, July 27-31, 2016, Walt Disney World®, Florida, USA / [ed] Ravindra Goonetilleke; Waldemar Karwowski, London: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2016, p. 1013-1022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the Swedish version of the Demand—Decision Latitude—Social support model was used. A total of 40 administrative staff and 40 cleaners participated. Demands and decision latitude scores were significantly higher in the administrative staff than in the cleaners. Social support scores were not significantly different between the administrative group and the group of cleaners. Psychological demands and skill discretion differed between the two working groups. The administrative staff’s perception of higher work demand and better decision latitude may be based on their belief that they possess appropriate education, general knowledge and detailed information about their work. Both groups had similar social support scores; it may be that members of both groups felt that they work as a group or team where their proximity fostered this perception of group social support

  • 20. Kumar, Rupesh
    et al.
    Wijaya, Andi
    Barabady, Javad
    Tromsø University.
    Markeset, Tore
    University of Stavanger.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ergonomic and maintainability design issues in mining2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to confined space and poor illumination in the mine the maintenance activities are difficult to perform which in turn leads to increased down time, cost and injuries. This also influences the productivity of maintenance personnel owing to stresses generated due to increased psychological and physiological demand on them. However, the industry has paid much less attention to the design of the mining machine in initial phase itself with respect to maintainability parameters leading to low productivity, increased maintenance time and increased likelihood of accidents during maintenance and operation of such equipment. The objective of the paper is to present ergonomics factors such as; anthropometery, human sensory, physiological and psychological application in relation to maintainability design issues in mining in order to reduce occupational risk factors and improved maintainability of the mining equipments leading to increased productivity.

  • 21.
    Legg, Stephen
    et al.
    Massey University, Centre for Ergonomics, Occupational Safety and Health, Department of Human Resource Management.
    Cruz, Christian
    Chaikumarn, Montakarn
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Comparison of Single and Double Strap Backpacks2002In: Putting Research to Work: Proceedings of the 11th Conference of the New Zealand Ergonomics Society, Wellington, 14-15 November 2002 / [ed] T.A. Bentley; D.C. Tappin, New Zealand Ergonomics Society , 2002, p. 75-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, several new designs of student backpack have been introduced to the world market, one of which is a popular single-strap backpack (SSB). This study compared an SSB with a more conventional double-strap backpack (DSB) using subjective perceptual methods. These methods included category ratio scale ratings of perceived regional comfort, undifferentiated rate of perceived exertion and subjective responses to written questions using either a 100 mm visual analogue scale or a free-format written response that inquired about practicality, comfort, adjustability, positive and negative feedbacks and overall subjective preference in a simulated field trial (walking around a representative 'field-route' for 20 minutes at a self-selected pace). The DSB was generally significantly superior to the SSB in terms of overall preference (13 participants selected DSB, 1 for SSB), practicality, adjustability, comfort, balance and ease of walking. DSB was also associated with less discomfort at the back of the neck, less perceived pressure on the shoulders and a lower rating of perceived exertion. It is concluded that a DSB is generally superior to an SSB for student load carriage.

  • 22.
    Legg, Stephen
    et al.
    Massey University, Centre for Ergonomics, Occupational Safety and Health, Department of Human Resource Management.
    Cruz, Christian
    Chaikumarn, Montakarn
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Efficacy of subjective perceptual methods in comparing between single and double strap student backpacks2002In: Third international cyberspace conference on ergonomics: CybErg 2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Singh, Sarbjeet
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Government College of Engineering and Technology, Jammu.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Evaluation of Human Error Probability of Disc Brake Unit Assembly and Wheel Set Maintenance of Railway Bogie2015In: Vol. 3, p. 3041-3048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The railway sector is key to the continuous expansion of industrialized nations, but the sector's working conditions and human performance requirements are qualitatively different from other industries. Human error in railway maintenance is a subject which warrants serious attention so as to achieve and sustain a competitive advantage. This paper investigates the probability of human error during the maintenance process of disc brake assembly unit and wheel set of railway bogie under various error producing conditions in railway maintenance workshop in Luleå, Sweden. The objective is to evaluate human error probability so as to take measures to reduce the likelihood of errors occurring within a system and, thus, to improve the overall levels of safety. For this paper, a case study that explores the causes of maintenance error during disassembly, inspection, maintenance, assembly and installation was derived from brain storming sessions among subject matter experts (SMEs), i.e technicians, supervisors and academic experts. In our case study, the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) was implemented to evaluate the probability of human error occurring throughout the completion of maintenance task. HEART is based upon the principle that every time a task is performed on the maintenance of a disc brake assembly unit and wheel set, there is a likelihood of failure and the probability of this is affected by one or more error producing condition, for instance, shortage of time, over-riding information, inexperience etc. This paper presents the need for interventions in the human factor elements of maintenance tasks performed on railway bogie. A number of factors directly or indirectly result in a decline in human performance, leading to errors in maintenance tasks. The probability of a technician committing an error during maintenance of the disc brake assembly unit and wheel set is found to be 0.20 and 0.039 respectively. It has been observed that error producing conditions such as time pressure, ability to detect and perceive problems, the existence of over-riding information, the need to make absolute decisions, and a mismatch between the operator and the designer's model are major contributors to human error.

  • 24.
    Singh, Sarbjeet
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Applying human factor analysis tools to a railway brake and wheel maintenance facility2015In: Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, ISSN 1355-2511, E-ISSN 1758-7832, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThis paper demonstrates three techniques to extract human factor information from specific railway maintenance tasks. It describes the techniques and shows how these tools can be applied to identify improvements in maintenance practices and workflow. Design/methodology/approachThree case studies were conducted on single group of technicians (N=19) at a railway maintenance workshop in Luleå, Sweden. Case study I examined the posture of the technicians while they were changing the brake shoes of freight wagons; the study employed the Standard Nordic Questionnaire and a videotape using the Ovako Working Posture Analysis System (OWAS). Case study II looked at maintenance repair times required to change the wheel axle on freight wagons at the workshop. A video filming method suggested by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work was used to measure actual maintenance time. Finally, case study III considered the technicians’ (N=19) perception of work demands, their control over the work and their social support while performing maintenance tasks (brake shoe and wheel axle maintenance); to this end, the case study used a demand control support questionnaire. FindingsIn the first case study, the Standard Nordic Questionnaire confirmed that technicians at this particular railway vehicle maintenance workshop suffer from back and shoulder pain. The Ovako Working Posture Analysis showed that 21% of the working time required to fit the brake wedge and cotter pin fits into two OWAS categories: category 3, where “change is required as soon as possible,” and category 4, where “change is required immediately”. Problems stem from poor workplace layout, incorrect posture and inaccessibility of tools and components. In the second study, the video analysis indicated that the working time to change the wheel axle of a freight wagon is greatly affected by poor workplace layout. The third case study showed that the technicians have lower “psychological demands” (mean=13), “higher control over work” (mean= 16) and “high social support” (mean= 22).Practical implicationsThe objective of this study was to apply knowledge about human factors to the functional relationships between maintenance personnel, tasks and the working environment to improve safety. If the workplace layout, working posture, maintenance manuals and accessibility of tools are poorly planned, maintenance performance can be adversely affected. The results of this study should assist maintenance management to design new policies and guidelines for improving the work environment.Originality/valueThree case studies were conducted at a railway maintenance workshop in Luleå, Sweden, to collect data on how human factors affect various railway maintenance tasks.

  • 25.
    Singh, Sarbjeet
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Modelling factors affecting human operator failure probability in railway maintenance tasks: an ISM-based analysis2015In: International Journal of Systems Assurance Engineering and Management, ISSN 0975-6809, E-ISSN 0976-4348, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 129-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the factors affecting human operators’ probability of failure when performing railway maintenance tasks. The objective is to understand the interaction of the various factors and to identify driving and dependent factors. The factors are identified through a survey of the literature and ranked using a Likert scale. The reliability of measures is pretested by applying Cronbach’s alpha coefficient to responses to the questionnaire given to maintenance personnel. An interpretive structural model is presented, and factors are classified using matrice d’impacts croises-multiplication appliquéà un classement (MICMAC). The research may help maintenance management understand the interaction of factors affecting human failure probability in railway maintenance and help management devise policies and guidelines for railway maintenance related tasks.

  • 26. Wijaya, Andi
    et al.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Implementing lean principle into mining industry issues and challenges2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lean production concept has its origin in automotive industry and is widely used in manufacturing sectors. What makes its applicability in mining difficult is the dynamic nature of mining operations bringing high degree of uncertainty in various unit operations. To reduce the wastage of efforts, one needs to remove uncertainty and predict the process behaviour as correct as possible. Furthermore, to achieve lean approach in mining, the entire mining chain needs to be considered starting from Mine exploration, mine planning, drilling operation, blasting, loading and transportation, ore dressing processes, reclamation, etc. To be lean in mining is not only dependent on mine production systems consisting of equipments and machines but it also depends on quality and reliability of information flow in real time generating action plans. Also, the reliability and maintenance preparedness have major influence on the degree of waste being generated in the process. For example if ore body is not correctly delineated/characterised or drilling operations not performed correctly, wrong charging process and wrong loading process- all may lead to wastage of resources. In fact Lean production has its origin (leans on) in JIT, TQM and TPM. The common denominator of all these philosophies is the human in the process. To improve any process one needs to measure the current status so that any change in current status can be recorded. The paper presents issues and challenges associated with implementation of Lean Principles in Mining industries.

  • 27.
    Öhrling, Therese
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Kumar, Rupesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Assessment of the development and implementation of tools in contract cleaning2012In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 687-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper illustrates and discusses problems with the implementation and use of ergonomic tools and techniques in the process of cleaning. Cleaning is an occupation with a high risk of developing work-related disorders. One high-strain task where recommended tools and techniques are difficult to apply is cleaning staircases. This study evaluated the muscular activity of cleaners while mopping staircases using two different mop handles and found that an easily adjustable mop handle can decrease a cleaner’s physical load. The results also show that the implementation and contextualization of the mop are of great importance for how a mop is used. A more holistic approach is needed to improve the benefits of good tools and techniques in cleaning work. More research is needed on how workplace organization can be improved to support the implementation of strategies to increase the health of professional cleaners.

1 - 27 of 27
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