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  • 1.
    Beheshti, Hooshang
    et al.
    Radford University, Radford, Virginia, USA.
    Hultman, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Jung, Marie-Louise
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Opoku, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Electronic supply chain management applications by Swedish SMEs2007In: Enterprise Information Systems, ISSN 1751-7575, E-ISSN 1751-7583, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 255-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet has become an integral part of business activities of most corporations today. Electronic supply chain management (SCM) can improve the operational efficiency of the firm by streamlining processes between the company and its suppliers, business partners, and customers. This research explores the extent and the degree of Internet application in Swedish small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The analyses of the data show that the Swedish SMEs use the Internet in their supply chain activities to a large degree. The study establishes some differences between smaller and larger organizations as well as between manufacturing and service companies.

  • 2.
    Hultman, Magnus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Jung, Marie-Louise
    Opoku, Robert
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Justifying your price online: an investigation of academic associations' online communication of membership benefits2007In: Marketing theory and practice in an inter-functional world: Proceedings of the 2007 World Marketing Congress, Verona, Italy / [ed] Carol W. DeMoranville, The Academy of Marketing Science, 2007, p. 123-127Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study identifies the benefits that are communicated online by a selection of academic associations. It also investigates the relationship between what is communicated online and the size of the associations' membership fees. The findings show that the level of the membership fee is to some extent influenced by the amount of words that communicate status on an association's website, as opposed to communication about conferences, job market, networking, publications, savings, size, or age.

  • 3. Jung, Marie-Louise
    E-health in Sweden: citizens' attitudes and expectations2008In: Collaboration and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies / [ed] Paul Cunningham; Miriam Cunningham, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2008, p. 29-35Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Jung, Marie-Louise
    From health to e-health: understanding citizens' acceptance of online health care2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of the challenges arising from an ageing population and runaway health-care costs, e-health offers tremendous opportunities for public and private health-care providers worldwide to optimize service delivery and enhance the quality of care being provided to patients. Even though the potential of e-health is acknowledged in academia as well as among practitioners, its application has proven to be remarkably difficult. In order for e-health to be successful, it is imperative that it offers services which address the needs of citizens and patients. Academia has recognized the importance of research on e-health adoption, but it focused mainly on organizational adoption and technological advances while it neglected the perspectives of health-care consumers. The purpose of this study was to investigate citizens' acceptance of e-health services by identifying the determinants of their intention to use e-health in the future. This knowledge of citizens' attitudes and needs is crucial to health-care managers who wish to pursue successful e-health initiatives. Through an extensive review of the literature and some initial exploratory fieldwork, factors relevant to citizens' acceptance of e-health were identified. Based on those determinants, a citizen survey was developed that collected the perceptions and attitudes of Swedish citizens towards the use of two Swedish e-health services: the online health guide and the ask-the-doctor online service. This investigation leads to the proposal of the e-Health Acceptance Model (eHAM), a theoretical framework that helps to understand and predict citizens' acceptance of online health care. This study demonstrates that awareness of the existence of such e-health services among Swedish citizens remains rather low despite the fact that the general attitude towards using e-health is quite positive. This emphasizes the importance of making citizens aware of the e-health alternatives available to them. The study finds that citizens' intention to use e-health is determined primarily by their attitude towards using e- health, which in turn results from the overall compatibility of e-health with citizens' needs, its perceived usefulness, and the risks associated with e-health usage. Offering clarity to the discrepancy and doubt about the role of the attitude construct that persisted in previous research, attitude here constitutes a strong mediator, capturing the majority of the effects of behavioral beliefs on usage intentions. Along with attitude, the perceived accessibility of e-health affects directly citizens' intention to use e-health in the future. In contrast to earlier assumptions and empirical findings, the key TAM determinant perceived ease of use, as well as the social influence construct subjective norm that is regarded as crucial in predicting social behavior, did not demonstrate any major effect on citizens' intention to use e-health. The technological advances required for e-health are available today, and citizens are generally positive about such developments in health-care service delivery. However, the adoption of innovations, new technologies, and services takes time, since changing people's habits is not an easy task. Thus, for the time being, it is important to view e-health as a powerful complement rather than a substitute for traditional channels. Not everyone is e-ready at this point, but the potential is there. The findings of this study highlight the critical role of communication. Citizens must be made aware of the service alternatives available to them as well as the advantages their use can bring. Uncertainty and hesitancy can be mitigated and adoption propelled by implementing risk-reducing measures and design features, and communicating those actions to citizens. The overall effort will be enhanced by ensuring information quality and strengthening provider- citizen relationships.

  • 5.
    Jung, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Berthon, Pierre
    Bentley University, Waltham.
    Fulfilling the promise: a model for delivering successful online health care2009In: Journal of Medical Marketing, ISSN 1745-7904, E-ISSN 1745-7912, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 243-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ageing populations and runaway health costs are challenging governments and tax payers across the developed world. E-health has been trumpeted as a potential saviour. Yet delivery has been patchy, consumer reaction mixed and adoption slow: the jury is still very much out on e-health. Part of the problem may be that research has tended to focus on the technology rather than the user and on the product rather than the service. Moreover, the exploratory studies on use have lacked theoretical grounding so that we know that things are not working - we just do not know why. This is where this research contributes. In this article we review the potential benefits and pitfalls of e-health, and drawing on the technological acceptance literature to develop a theory-based model of e-health acceptance. Our model is a step towards providing the answer to the question of why e-health fails and how it can be made to work.

  • 6. Jung, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Hultman, Magnus
    Opoku, Robert
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Internet usage in supply chain managemant and its impact on overall efficiency: a Swedish SME perspective2007In: Proceedings of the annual conference of the Academy of Marketing Science / [ed] Dheeraj Sharma; Shaheen Borna, The Academy of Marketing Science, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7. Jung, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Loria, Karla
    Mostaghel, Rana
    Saha, Parmita
    E-learning: university students' acceptance of technoloy2008In: European Journal of Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1027-5207, E-ISSN 1027-5207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information Communication Technology (ICT) is reshaping form and mode of delivery of higher education world wide. Some of the main challenges in education are access issues, and costs. In order to overcome those challenges ICT can play an important role. The application of ICT in the education sector can be referred to as e-learning, and comprises the use of various web-based technological tools with the purpose of disseminating education. The purpose of this study is to investigate what determines university students' acceptance of e-learning by applying the technology acceptance model (TAM). The study was conducted at a Swedish University among business students. The results demonstrate that Perceived usefulness is the main determinant of a student's acceptance of e-learning.

  • 8.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Jung, Marie-Louise
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Peighambari, Kaveh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Tretten, Phillip
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    What makes people want to become self-employed?: Applying the theory of planned behavior2009In: Advances in Management, ISSN 0974-2611, E-ISSN 2278-4551, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world economy currently seems to be failing, and the effects are being felt around the globe. There are many upcoming news about rising unemployment, major corporations cutting jobs and workers who can't seem to find work. The current economic climate makes many people wary of spending money, which can be bad news for those who make a living through the buying of others. Many things, however, are not simply going to go away because the economy is rough. Some buyers and employers may feel reticent when it comes to hiring, and this could create trouble for those who survive by self employment. But in every economic crisis, some markets remain successful - and those who live through self employment are generally pretty good about applying their skills where needed. Increasing self-employment is an objective frequently seen on government agenda, as small businesses are often seen as a remedy for unemployment and pivotal for economies to grow8. Despite the distinct value of self-employment to the economy as a whole as well as to the individual starting her own, in the Nordic countries, self-employment rates are far lower than one would expect. This has led to extensive research efforts on the impact of economic and other external factors on self-employment rates, in order to crystallize out key drivers to self-employment in an economy, related to which specific government programs and initiatives can be launched. This paper contributes by specifying and testing the impact of internal factors that determine an individual's decision on whether to become self employed. Understanding the internal drivers of individuals' intentions will help to further trace the impact of external initiatives on individual behavior. This paper applies the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), on the most well established models explaining social behavior, to test the impact of attitude, social pressures and perceived control among Swedish men and women. Data is collected from over 400 Swedish university students with various backgrounds. As is suggested in TPB, the results provide that the strongest determinant of individuals' intention to become self-employed is their attitude towards being self employed, which stems from behavioral beliefs about having one's own business. The paper further finds that, along with the attitude, men are mainly influenced by their perceptions of control, whereas women are affected by their perceived pressures in their social surrounding. The paper provides several implications for governments and some avenues for future research.

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