Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Amin, Sidra
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan.Department of Chemistry, Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University, Shaheed Benazirabad, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Solangi, Amber
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Beni, Valerio
    RISE Acreo, Research Institute of Sweden, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Morante, J.R
    Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Barcelona, Spain.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry, Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering, Sweden.
    Falhman, Mats
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry, Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering, Sweden.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ibupoto, Zafar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    A practical non-enzymatic urea sensor based on NiCo2O4 nanoneedles2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 25, p. 14443-14451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a new facile electrochemical sensing platform for determination of urea, based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with nickel cobalt oxide (NiCo2O4) nanoneedles. These nanoneedles are used for the first time for highly sensitive determination of urea with the lowest detection limit (1 μM) ever reported for the non-enzymatic approach. The nanoneedles were grown through a simple and low-temperature aqueous chemical method. We characterized the structural and morphological properties of the NiCo2O4 nanoneedles by TEM, SEM, XPS and XRD. The bimetallic nickel cobalt oxide exhibits nanoneedle morphology, which results from the self-assembly of nanoparticles. The NiCo2O4 nanoneedles are exclusively composed of Ni, Co, and O and exhibit a cubic crystalline phase. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the enhanced electrochemical properties of a NiCo2O4 nanoneedle-modified GCE by overcoming the typical poor conductivity of bare NiO and Co3O4. The GCE-modified electrode is highly sensitive towards urea, with a linear response (R2 = 0.99) over the concentration range 0.01–5 mM and with a detection limit of 1.0 μM. The proposed non-enzymatic urea sensor is highly selective even in the presence of common interferents such as glucose, uric acid, and ascorbic acid. This new urea sensor has good viability for urea analysis in urine samples and can represent a significant advancement in the field, owing to the simple and cost-effective fabrication of electrodes, which can be used as a promising analytical tool for urea estimation.

  • 2.
    Amin, Sidra
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan. Department of Chemistry, Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University, Shaheed Benazirabad, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Solangi, Amber
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ibupoto, Zafar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Chemistry, Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University, Shaheed Benazirabad, Pakistan.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    A sensitive enzyme-free lactic acid sensor based on NiO nanoparticles for practical applications2019In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 11, p. 3578-3583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A facile and efficient electrochemical sensing platform has been successfully exploited for the first time for the determination of lactic acid using a nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticle-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Nickel oxide nanoparticles were prepared by a chemical growth method using different quantities of arginine as a soft template. The structural and morphological properties of NiO nanoparticles were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to study the electrochemical properties of various samples. The modified electrode is highly sensitive and presents a linear response over a wide range (0.005–5 mM) of lactic acid concentrations in 0.1 M NaOH. The detection limit for the sensor was found to be 5.7 μM, and it exhibits good stability. Furthermore, the sensor shows excellent selectivity in the presence of common interfering species. The lactic acid sensor showed good viability for lactic acid analysis in real samples (milk, yogurt and red wine) and demonstrated significant advancement in sensor technology for practical applications.

  • 3.
    Amin, Sidra
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan. Department of Chemistry, Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University, Shaheed Benazirabad, Sindh Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Solangi, Amber R.
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, National Research Council, Bologna, Italy.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Sindh Pakistan.
    Fatima, Almas
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172 Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Functional Nickel Oxide Nanostructures for Ethanol Oxidation in Alkaline Media2020In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 1052-1059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nickel oxide (NiO) nanostructures are employed in the basic medium for the oxidation of ethanol. A variety of NiO nanostructures are synthesized by wet chemical growth method, using different hydroxide (OH−) ion sources, particularly from ammonia, hexamethylenetetramine, urea and sodium hydroxide. The use of urea as (OH−) ion source results in flower‐like NiO structures composed by extremely thin nanowalls (thickness lower than 10 nm,), which demonstrated to be the most active for ethanol oxidation. All the samples exhibit NiO cubic phase, and no other impurity was detected. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) curves of NiO nanostructures were found linear over the concentration range 0.1–3.5 mM (R2=0.99) of ethanol, with the limit of detection estimated to be 0.013 mM for ethanol. The NiO nanostructures exhibit a selective signal towards ethanol oxidation in the presence of different members of alcohol family. The proposed NiO nanostructures showed a significant practicality for the reproducible and sensitive determination of ethanol from brandy, whisky, mixture of brandy and rum, and vodka samples. The nanomaterial was used as a surface modifying agent for the glassy carbon electrode and it showed a stable electro‐oxidation activity for the ethanol for 16 days. These findings indicate that the presented NiO nanomaterial can be applied in place of noble metals for ethanol sensing and other environmental applications (like fuel cells).

  • 4.
    Ibupoto, Zafar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Dr. M.A Kazi Institute of Chemistry University of Sindh Jamshoro,Sindh, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Tang, PengYi
    Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and BIST, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain;Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Morante, Joan Ramon
    Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arbiol, Jordi
    Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and BIST, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain;ICREA, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    MoSx@NiO Composite Nanostructures: An Advanced Nonprecious Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Media2019In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 29, no 7, article id 1807562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of the earth‐abundant, nonprecious, efficient, and stable electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline media is a hot research topic in the field of renewable energies. A heterostructured system composed of MoSx deposited on NiO nanostructures (MoSx@NiO) as a robust catalyst for water splitting is proposed here. NiO nanosponges are applied as cocatalyst for MoS2 in alkaline media. Both NiO and MoS2@NiO composites are prepared by a hydrothermal method. The NiO nanostructures exhibit sponge‐like morphology and are completely covered by the sheet‐like MoS2. The NiO and MoS2 exhibit cubic and hexagonal phases, respectively. In the MoSx@NiO composite, the HER experiment in 1 m KOH electrolyte results in a low overpotential (406 mV) to produce 10 mA cm−2 current density. The Tafel slope for that case is 43 mV per decade, which is the lowest ever achieved for MoS2‐based electrocatalyst in alkaline media. The catalyst is highly stable for at least 13 h, with no decrease in the current density. This simple, cost‐effective, and environmentally friendly methodology can pave the way for exploitation of MoSx@NiO composite catalysts not only for water splitting, but also for other applications such as lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells.

  • 5.
    Izyumskaya, N.
    et al.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ibupoto, Zafar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Lewinski, N.
    Department of Chemical and Lifescience Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
    Avrutin, V.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
    Özgür, Ü
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
    Topsakal, E.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
    Willander, M.
    Department of Science and Technology, Campus Norrkoping, Linköping University.
    Morkoç, H.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
    Review-Electrochemical Biosensors Based on ZnO Nanostructures2017In: ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology, ISSN 2162-8769, E-ISSN 2162-8777, Vol. 6, no 8, p. Q84-Q100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, electrochemical biosensors based on semiconductor and metal nanostructures have attracted a great deal of attention as new instruments in the healthcare arsenal that could substantially enhance early diagnostics capabilities and thus enable active health management. Among numerous materials studied, nanostructured ZnO has been recognized as a promising platform for biomedical applications owing to its low cost, relative ease of preparation leading to a rich variety of nanostructures with high aspect ratios (nanowires, nanobelts, nanoflakes), proven biocompatibility in the bulk form, electronic properties supporting various device types, and catalytic surface activity. In this contribution, we review the recent progress in development of enzymatic and non-enzymatic biosensors based on ZnO nanostructures. After a critical discussion of biocompatibility of nanostructured ZnO, we segue into the discussion of ZnO-based devices for detection of physiologically important analytes, including glucose, cholesterol, L-lactic acid, uric acid, metal ions, and pH. Special attention is given to ZnO nanorod based sensors for intracellular measurements.

  • 6.
    Tahira, Aneela
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ibupoto, Zafar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Dr. M.A Kazi Institute of Chemistry University of Sindh Jamshoro, Sindh, Pakistan.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Istituto per la Microelettronica ed i Microsistemi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IMM-CNR), Bologna, Italy.
    You, Shujie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Morandi, Vittorio
    Istituto per la Microelettronica ed i Microsistemi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IMM-CNR), Bologna, Italy.
    Natile, Marta Maria
    Università di Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Ca’ Foscari University Venice, Venice, Italy.
    Advanced Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Based on Core–Shell MoS2/TiO2 Nanostructures in Acidic and Alkaline Media2019In: ACS Applied Energy Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 2053-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen production as alternative energy source is still a challenge due to the lack of efficient and inexpensive catalysts, alternative to platinum. Thus, stable, earth abundant, and inexpensive catalysts are of prime need for hydrogen production via hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Herein, we present an efficient and stable electrocatalyst composed of earth abundant TiO2 nanorods decorated with molybdenum disulfide thin nanosheets, a few nanometers thick. We grew rutile TiO2 nanorods via the hydrothermal method on conducting glass substrate, and then we nucleated the molybdenum disulfide nanosheets as the top layer. This composite possesses excellent hydrogen evolution activity in both acidic and alkaline media at considerably low overpotentials (350 mV and 700 mV in acidic and alkaline media, respectively) and small Tafel slopes (48 and 60 mV/dec in acidic and alkaline conditions, respectively), which are better than several transition metal dichalcogenides, such as pure molybdenum disulfide and cobalt diselenide. A good stability in acidic and alkaline media is reported here for the new MoS2/TiO2 electrocatalyst. These results demonstrate the potential of composite electrocatalysts for HER based on earth abundant, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly materials, which can also be of interest for a broader range of scalable applications in renewable energies, such as lithium sulfur batteries, solar cells, and fuel cells.

  • 7.
    Tahira, Aneela
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Dr. M. A Kazi Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Ibupoto, Zafar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Dr. M. A Kazi Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Montecchi, Monica
    Engineering Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    Pasquali, Luca
    Engineering Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy; Chemistry, IOM‐CNR Institute, Trieste, Italy; Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park, South Africa.
    Tonezzer, Matteo
    MEM‐CNR, Sede di Trento‐FBK, Trento, Italy.
    Nafady, Ayman
    Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Khalil, Huda F.
    Electronics Materials Department, City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications (SRTA‐City), Alexandria, Egypt.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Department of science and technology, CNR IMM, Bologna, Italy.
    Morandi, Vittorio
    Department of science and technology, CNR IMM, Bologna, Italy.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Role of cobalt precursors in the synthesis of Co 3 O 4 hierarchical nanostructures toward the development of cobalt‐based functional electrocatalysts for bifunctional water splitting in alkaline and acidic media2022In: Journal of the Chinese Chemical Society (Taipei), ISSN 0009-4536, E-ISSN 2192-6549, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 681-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The precursors have significant influence on the catalytic activity of nonprecious electrocatalysts for effective water splitting. Herein, we report active electrocatalysts based on cobalt oxide (Co3O4) hierarchical nanostructures derived from four different precursors of cobalt (acetate, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate salts) using the low-temperature aqueous chemical growth method. It has been found that the effect of precursor on the morphology of nanostructured material depends on the synthetic method. The Co3O4 nanostructures exhibited cubic phase derived from these four precursors. The Co3O4 nanostructures obtained from chloride precursor have demonstrated improved oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) compared to other precursors due relatively higher content of Co3O4 nanostructures at the surface of material. An overpotential of 400 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) at 10 mA cm−2 was observed for HER. The Co3O4 nanostructures derived from the chloride precursor have shown favorable reaction kinetics via 34 mV dec−1 value of the Tafel slope for HER reaction. The Co3O4 nanostructures derived from chloride precursor have also shown an excellent HER durability for 15 hr in alkaline media. Furthermore, the OER functional characterization was carried out onto Co3O4 nanostructures derived from chloride precursor exhibited 220 mV overpotential at 10 mA cm−2 and Tafel slope of 56 mV dec−1. Importantly, the reason behind the favorable catalytic activity of Co3O4 nanostructures derived from chloride precursor was linked to one order of magnitude smaller charge transfer resistance and higher amount of Co3O4 content at the surface of nanostructures than the Co3O4 nanostructures derived from other precursors. The performance of Co3O4 nanostructures derived from chloride precursor via the wet chemical method suggests that cobalt chloride precursor could be of great interest for the development of efficient, stable, nonprecious, and environmentally friendly electrocatalysts for the chemical energy conversion and storage devices.

  • 8.
    Tahira, Aneela
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Sindh, Pakistan.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. CNR-IMM, Via Piero Gobetti 101, Bologna, 40129, Italy.
    Rigoni, Federica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Nafady, Ayman
    Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Shaikh, Shoyebmohamad F.
    Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Alothman, Asma A.
    Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Alshgari, Razan A.
    Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Sindh, Pakistan.
    A simple and efficient visible light photodetector based on Co3O4/ZnO composite2021In: Optical and quantum electronics, ISSN 0306-8919, E-ISSN 1572-817X, Vol. 53, no 9, article id 534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we propose for the first time visible light photodetector based on n-type ZnO nanorods decorated with p-type Co3O4 nanowires. The heterojunction was fabricated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate by low temperature aqueous chemical growth method. ZnO exhibits nanorod morphology and cobalt oxide possesses nanowire shape with sharp tail. Energy dispersive spectroscopy confirmed the presence of Zn, O, and Co elements in the heterojunction. ZnO and Co3O4 have hexagonal and cubic phases, respectively, as confirmed by XRD. The dense and perpendicular ZnO nanorods are acting as a scattering layer for visible light, while Co3O4 nanowires act as a visible-light absorber. The all oxide p–n junction can operate as visible light photodetector. Furthermore, the heterojunction also shows a reproducible and fast response for the detection of visible light. Optimization of the device is needed (presence of buffer layers, tuning a thickness of the optical absorber) to improve its functionalities. 

  • 9.
    Willander, M.
    et al.
    Department of Science and Technology, Campus Norrkoping, Linköping University.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ibupoto, Zafar
    University of Sindh Jamshoro.
    Potentiometric Biosensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures2017In: Reference Module in Chemistry, Molecular Sciences and Chemical Engineering / [ed] Jan Reedijk, Elsevier, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous potentiometric biosensors are fabricated via biocatalytic and bioaffinity-based biosensing mechanisms. Only few of them are useful and applicable to the biomedical application and analysis. The most of those sensing schemes are mainly related to the protein metabolism especially urea and creatinine. The emergence of nanoscience and nanotechnology in the biomedical applications has provided the solid platform for the development of sensitive and selective potentiometric biosensors as new generation analytical devices. Therefore, among the nanomaterials, metal oxides are of prime importance for the potentiometric analytical devices due to generation of strong potential signals and excellent biocompatibility with the proteins such as enzymes, antibodies, DNA, and biological cells. This book chapter is dedicated to the recent advancement in the development of potentiometric biosensors such as urea, uric acid, glucose, and cholesterol due to nanoscience from fundamental to advanced configuration approach of devices.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf