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  • 1.
    Abduljabar, Fada
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Fayete, Marthe
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Kvinnors upplevelser av att leva med polycystiskt ovarialsyndrom: En litteraturstudie2022Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Abstrakt

    Bakgrund: Polycystiskt ovarialsyndrom är en endokrin sjukdom som drabbar 5-10% av kvinnor i fertil ålder. Orsaken till diagnosen är ännu inte fastställd men kan ha en viss anknytning till ärftlighet. I samband med diagnosen förekommer ett flertal symtom som medför lidande. Syftet: Var att beskriva kvinnors upplevelser av att leva med Polycystiskt ovarialsyndrom. Metod: Fjorton vetenskapliga studier analyserades med en kvalitativ innehållsanalys med manifest induktiv ansats. Resultat: Fem slutliga kategorier framkom i resultatet: Att leva med bristande förmåga att bli gravid, Att känna skam och dölja sitt utseende, Att påverkas av diagnosen inifrån och utifrån, Att leva med en diagnos som förändrar relationer och Att känna sig missnöjd i mötet med sjukvårdspersonal. Slutsats: Att leva med kronisk sjukdom innebär förändringar i vardagen. En djupare förståelse av kvinnors upplevelser av PCOS kan bidra till förbättrad omvårdnad utifrån ett helhetsperspektiv.

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  • 2.
    Almevall, Albin Dahlin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology. Department of Healthcare, Region Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology.
    Öhlin, Jerry
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science Orthopaedics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nordmark, Sofi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Sunderby Research Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Associations between everyday physical activity and morale in older adults2022In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 48, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies that objectively investigate patterns of everyday physical activity in relation to well-being and that use measures specific to older adults are scarce. This study aimed to explore objectively measured everyday physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to a morale measure specifically constructed for older adults. A total of 77 persons (42 women, 35 men) aged 80 years or older (84.3 ± 3.8) wore an accelerometer device for at least 5 days. Morale was measured with the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS). PGCMS scores were significantly positively associated with number of steps, time spent stepping, and time spent stepping at >75 steps per minute. Sedentary behavior did not associate with PGCMS. Promoting PA in the form of walking at any intensity–or even spending time in an upright position—and in any quantity may be important for morale, or vice versa, or the influence may be bidirectional.

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  • 3.
    Almqvist Berglund, Joy
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    J Heikkilä, Linnea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Kan 20 minuter massage i hemmet bidra med stressreducering hos kärlekspar?2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to find out if a shorter massage at home can contribute to stress reduction in love couples and if an instructional video for teaching massage can be a good method. A qualitative and quantitative approach has been used, also called mixed methods. The participants were 18 people, all of whom were involved in love relationships. Initially, the participants had to watch a recorded short information video about massage and then, with the support of a recorded 20-minute instructional video, massage each other on the back and neck. Before and after giving or receiving a massage, they also had to respond to an online survey. The results from the survey showed that the stress level decreased in both those who gave (p = 0.0463) and those who received (p = 0.001) massage. Of those who received massage, all felt relaxed afterwards and the majority (83.3%) felt calm. Those who gave massages also felt calmer (77.8%) afterwards. None of the participants stated that they felt stressed after the massage. An instructional video proved, through the answers from the web survey, to be a good method for teaching massage to love couples.

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  • 4.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    et al.
    Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Box 645, SE 405 30, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Amuakwa Mensah, Salome
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Klege, Rebecca Afua
    School of Economics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch, 7701, Cape Town, South Africa; Henry J Austin Health Center, 321 N. Warren Street, Trenton, 08618, New Jersey, USA.
    Adom, Philip Kofi
    Department of Development Policy, School of Public Service and Governance, Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA), Ghana.
    Stockpiling and food worries: Changing habits and choices in the midst of COVID-19 pandemic2022In: Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, ISSN 0038-0121, E-ISSN 1873-6041, Vol. 82 A, article id 101181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Albeit, governments have instituted strong containment measures in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns of continuous local spread and economic impact of the virus are impacting global food chains and food security. This paper investigates the effect of concern about the i) local spread and ii) economic impact of COVID-19, on the change in the amount of food and necessities bought in twelve Sub-Sahara African countries. In addition, we examine if these effects are channeled through food worries. The study uses a unique survey dataset by GeoPoll collected in April 2020 (first round) and May 2020 (second round) and employs a multinomial logit and generalized structural equation models. We find significant effect of concern about COVID-19 on change in the package size of food and necessities bought, which is heterogeneous across gender group and rural-urban divide. Our results reveal that concerns of COVID-19 might be promoting stockpiling behavior among females and those with no food worries (due to having sufficient money or resources). This if not properly managed could in the medium to long-term affect the food supply chain, food waste and exacerbate food worries problem especially for already food deprived homes. We discuss the policy implications.

  • 5.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts. Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Box 645, SE 405 30, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Klege, Rebecca Afua
    School of Economics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch, 7701, Cape Town, South Africa; Henry J Austin Health Center, 321 N. Warren Street, Trenton, 08618, New Jersey, USA.
    Adom, Philip Kofi
    Department of Development Policy School of Public Service, Governance Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration GIMPA, Ghana.
    Köhlin, Gunnar
    Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Box 645, SE 405 30, Göteborg, Sweden; School of Economics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch, 7701, Cape Town, South Africa.
    COVID-19 and handwashing: Implications for water use in Sub-Saharan Africa2021In: Water Resources and Economics, ISSN 2212-4284, Vol. 36, article id 100189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because the main modes of transmission of the COVID-19 virus are respiration and contact, WHO recommends frequent washing of hands with soap under running water for at least 20 s. This article investigates how the level of concern about COVID-19 affects the likelihood of washing hands frequently in sub-Saharan Africa. We discuss the implication of the findings for water-scarce environment. The study makes use of a unique survey dataset from 12 sub-Saharan African countries collected in April 2020 (first round) and May 2020 (second round) and employs an extended ordered probit model with endogenous covariate. The results show that the level of concern about the spread of the virus increases the likelihood of washing hands with soap under running water for a minimum of 20 s at least five times a day. The increase in the probability of handwashing due to concern about COVID-19, ranges from 3% for Benin to 6.3% for South Africa. The results also show heterogeneous effects across gender- and age-groups, locality and various water sources. However, in Africa, the sustainability of the handwashing protocol could be threatened by the severe water scarcity that exists in the region. To sustain frequent handwashing, sub-Saharan Africa needs an effective strategy for water management and supply.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology. Swedish Red Cross University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Fredholm, Angelica
    County Council Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Health Science, Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nordin, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology. Department of Health Science, Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology.
    Moral Distress, Health and Intention to Leave: Critical Care Nurses’ Perceptions During COVID-19 Pandemic2023In: Sage Open Nursing, E-ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Moral distress increases the risk that critical care nurses will lose the ability to provide quality nursing care.

    Aims: To describe person-related conditions and perceptions of moral distress, health and intention to leave among critical care nurses in intensive care units, and to examine the relationship between person-related conditions, moral distress, health and intention to leave.

    Method: Cross-sectional, with 220 critical care nurses in 15 Swedish ICUs, and data gathered via a self-reported questionnaire.

    Results: Highest moral distress scores were reported in futile care and poor teamwork and 21% reported entertaining an intention to leave. Self-reported health was lower than before the COVID-19 pandemic and 4.1% reported pronounced exhaustion disorder. Self-reported health, reduced capacity to tolerate demands under time pressure, emotional instability or irritability, physical weakness, or being more easily fatigued and with decreased well-being were factors that had a relationship with futile care. Sleeping problems and intention to leave had a relationship with poor teamwork.

    Conclusions: Different strategies are needed to reduce moral distress and the leadership is crucial for managing crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

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  • 7.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology. Umeå university, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section for Sustainable Health/the OLIN unit.
    Lindmark, Sofia Winsa
    Umeå University, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section for Sustainable Health/the OLIN unit, Luleå, Sweden.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section for Medicine/the OLIN unit, Luleå, Sweden.
    Warm, Katja
    Umeå University, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section for Medicine/the OLIN unit, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Myrberg, Tomi
    Umeå University, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section for Medicine/the OLIN unit, Luleå, Sweden.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, University of Tampere; Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section for Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section for Medicine/the OLIN unit, Luleå, Sweden.
    Obesity and inflammatory markers in adult-onset asthma2021In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 58, no 65, article id OA4215Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Umeå University.
    Räisänen, Petri
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Andersson, Martin
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Umeå University.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Increased prevalence of allergic asthma from 1996 to 2006 and further to 2016: results from three population surveys2017In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1426-1435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the latter half of the 20th century, the prevalence of asthma and many other allergic diseases has increased. Information on asthma prevalence trends among adults after 2010, especially regarding studies separating allergic asthma from non-allergic asthma, is lacking.

    Objective

    The aim was to estimate prevalence trends of current asthma among adults, both allergic and non-allergic, from 1996 to 2016.

    Methods

    Three cross-sectional samples from the same area of Sweden, 20-69 years, participated in surveys with the same questionnaire in 1996 (n=7104 participants, 85% response rate), 2006 (n=6165, 77%) and 2016 (n=5466, 53%), respectively. Allergic rhino-conjunctivitis (ARC) was used as a marker for allergic sensitization to define allergic asthma.

    Results

    The prevalence of current asthma increased from 8.4% (95% CI: 7.8-9.0) in 1996 to 9.9% (95% CI: 9.2-10.6) in 2006 and 10.9% (95% CI: 10.1-11.7) in 2016 (P<.001). Allergic asthma increased from 5.0% (95% CI: 4.5-5.5) in 1996 to 6.0% (95% CI: 5.4-6.6) in 2006 and further to 7.3% (95% CI: 6.6-8.0) in 2016 (P<.001), while the prevalence of non-allergic asthma remained stable around 3.4%-3.8%. The increase in current asthma was most pronounced among women and among the middle-aged. Physician-diagnosed asthma, asthma medication use and ARC also increased significantly, while the prevalence of symptoms common in asthma such as wheeze and attacks of shortness of breath decreased slightly or was stable. The prevalence of current smoking decreased from 27.4% in 1996 to 12.3% in 2016.

    Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

    The prevalence of allergic asthma increased from 1996 to 2006 and further to 2016, while the prevalence of non-allergic asthma remained on a stable prevalence level. The prevalence of symptoms common in asthma decreased slightly or was stable despite a substantial decrease in the prevalence of current smoking. Clinicians should be aware that the previously observed increase in prevalence of allergic asthma is still ongoing.

  • 9.
    Banna, Md. Hasan Al
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Bangladesh University of Professionals, Dhaka 1216, Bangladesh.
    Ghosh, Tapotosh
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, United International University, Dhaka 1209, Bangladesh.
    Nahian, Md. Jaber AL
    Department of Information and Communication Technology, Bangladesh University of Professionals, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.
    Kaiser, M. Shamim
    Institute of Information Technology, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342, Bangladesh.
    Mahmud, Mufti
    Department of Computer Science and Medical Technology Innovation Facility, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton, NG11 8NS Nottingham, U.K..
    Taher, Kazi Abu
    Department of Information and Communication Technology, Bangladesh University of Professionals, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Mohammad Shahadat
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331, Bangladesh.
    Andersson, Karl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    A Hybrid Deep Learning Model to Predict the Impact of COVID-19 on Mental Health from Social Media Big Data2023In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 11, p. 77009-77022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is provoking a prevalent consequence on mental health because of less interaction among people, economic collapse, negativity, fear of losing jobs, and death of the near and dear ones. To express their mental state, people often are using social media as one of the preferred means. Due to reduced outdoor activities, people are spending more time on social media than usual and expressing their emotion of anxiety, fear, and depression. On a daily basis, about 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are generated on social media. Analyzing this big data can become an excellent means to evaluate the effect of COVID-19 on mental health. In this work, we have analyzed data from Twitter microblog (tweets) to find out the effect of COVID-19 on people&#x2019;s mental health with a special focus on depression. We propose a novel pipeline, based on recurrent neural network (in the form of long short-term memory or LSTM) and convolutional neural network, capable of identifying depressive tweets with an accuracy of 99.42%. Preprocessed using various natural language processing techniques, the aim was to find out depressive emotion from these tweets. Analyzing over 571 thousand tweets posted between October 2019 and May 2020 by 482 users, a significant rise in depressing tweets was observed between February and May of 2020, which indicates as an impact of the long ongoing COVID-19 pandemic situation.

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  • 10.
    Bentham, James
    et al.
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Di Cesare, Mariachiara
    Imperial College London, UK; Middlesex University, UK.
    Stevens, Gretchen A.
    World Health Organization, Switzerland.
    Zhou, Bin
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Bixby, Honor
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Cowan, Melanie
    World Health Organization, Switzerland.
    Fortunato, Léa
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Bennett, James E.
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Danaei, Goodarz
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA.
    Hajifathalian, Kaveh
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA.
    Lu, Yuan
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA.
    Riley, Leanne M.
    World Health Organization, Switzerland.
    Laxmaiah, Avula
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India.
    Kontis, Vasilis
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Paciorek, Christopher J.
    University of California, Berkeley, USA.
    Riboli, Elio
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Ezzati, Majid
    Imperial College London, UK; WHO Collaborating Centre on NCD Surveillance and Epidemiology, UK.
    Abdeen, Ziad A.
    Al-Quds University, Palestine.
    Hamid, Zargar Abdul
    Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Care, India.
    Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M.
    Birzeit University, Palestine.
    Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin
    Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico.
    Adams, Robert
    The University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Aekplakorn, Wichai
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.
    Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutricion, Mexico.
    Agyemang, Charles
    University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ahmadvand, Alireza
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Germany.
    Alhazzaa, Hazzaa M.
    King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.
    Al-Othman, Amani Rashed
    Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait.
    Raddadi, Rajaa Al
    Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia.
    Ali, Mohamed M.
    World Health Organization Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Egypt.
    Alkerwi, Ala’A
    Luxembourg Institute of Health, Luxembourg.
    Alvarez-Pedrerol, Mar
    ISGlobal Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Spain.
    Aly, Eman
    World Health Organization Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Egypt.
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Lille University and Hospital, France.
    Amuzu, Antoinette
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK.
    Andersen, Lars Bo
    Sogn and Fjordane University College, Norway.
    Anderssen, Sigmund A.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Anjana, Ranjit Mohan
    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer
    National Institute of Public Health, Tunisia.
    Ariansen, Inger
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Aris, Tahir
    Ministry of Health Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Arlappa, Nimmathota
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India.
    Arveiler, Dominique
    University of Strasbourg and Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
    Assah, Felix K.
    University of Yaoundé 1, Cameroon.
    Avdicová, Mária
    Regional Authority of Public Health, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia.
    Azizi, Fereidoun
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Babu, Bontha V.
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India.
    Bahijri, Suhad
    King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia.
    Balakrishna, Nagalla
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India.
    Bandosz, Piotr
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Banegas, José R.
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Barbagallo, Carlo M.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Barceló, Alberto
    Pan American Health Organization, USA.
    Barkat, Amina
    Mohammed V University de Rabat, Morocco.
    Barros, Mauro V.
    University of Pernambuco, Brazil.
    Bata, Iqbal
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Batieha, Anwar M.
    Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan.
    Batista, Rosangela L.
    Federal University of Maranhao, Brazil.
    Baur, Louise A.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Beaglehole, Robert
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Romdhane, Habiba Ben
    University Tunis El Manar, Tunisia.
    Benet, Mikhail
    University Medical Science, Cuba.
    Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio
    Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Peru.
    Bernotiene, Gailute
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Bettiol, Heloisa
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Bhagyalaxmi, Aroor
    B. J. Medical College, India.
    Bharadwaj, Sumit
    Chirayu Medical College, India.
    Bhargava, Santosh K.
    Sunder Lal Jain Hospital, India.
    Bhatti, Zaid
    The Aga Khan University, Pakistan.
    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.
    The Aga Khan University, Pakistan; The Hospital for Sick Children, Canada.
    Bi, Hongsheng
    Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China.
    Bi, Yufang
    Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, China.
    Bjerregaard, Peter
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; University of Greenland, Greenland.
    Bjertness, Espen
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Bjertness, Marius B.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blokstra, Anneke
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands.
    Bo, Simona
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Bobak, Martin
    University College London, UK.
    Boddy, Lynne M.
    Liverpool John Moores University, UK.
    Boehm, Bernhard O.
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Boeing, Heiner
    German Institute of Human Nutrition, Germany.
    Boissonnet, Carlos P.
    CEMIC, Argentina.
    Bongard, Vanina
    Toulouse University School of Medicine, France.
    Bovet, Pascal
    Ministry of Health, Seychelles; University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Braeckman, Lutgart
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Bragt, Marjolijn C. E.
    FrieslandCampina, Singapore.
    Brajkovich, Imperia
    Universidad Central de Venezuela, Venezuela.
    Branca, Francesco
    World Health Organization, Switzerland.
    Breckenkamp, Juergen
    Bielefeld University, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Cancer Research Center, Germany.
    Brewster, Lizzy M.
    University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Brian, Garry R.
    The Fred Hollows Foundation New Zealand, New Zealand.
    Bruno, Graziella
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Bueno-De-mesquita, H. B.
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands.
    Bugge, Anna
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Burns, Con
    Cork Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    de León, Antonio Cabrera
    Universidad de La Laguna, Spain.
    Cacciottolo, Joseph
    University of Malta, Malta.
    Cama, Tilema
    Ministry of Health, Tonga.
    Cameron, Christine
    Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, Canada.
    Camolas, José
    Hospital Santa Maria, CHLN, Portugal.
    Can, Günay
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Cândido, Ana Paula C.
    Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Capuano, Vincenzo
    Cardiologia di Mercato S. Severino, Italy.
    Cardoso, Viviane C.
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Carvalho, Maria J.
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Casanueva, Felipe F.
    Santiago de Compostela University, Spain.
    Casas, Juan-Pablo
    University College London, UK.
    Caserta, Carmelo A.
    Associazione Calabrese di Epatologia, Italy.
    Chamukuttan, Snehalatha
    India Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Chan, Angelique W.
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Chan, Queenie
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Chaturvedi, Himanshu K.
    National Institute of Medical Statistics, India.
    Chaturvedi, Nishi
    University College London, UK.
    Chen, Chien-Jen
    Academia Sinica, Taiwan.
    Chen, Fangfang
    Capital Institute of Pediatrics, China.
    Chen, Huashuai
    Duke University, USA.
    Chen, Shuohua
    Kailuan General Hospital, China.
    Chen, Zhengming
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Cheng, Ching-Yu
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Chetrit, Angela
    The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Israel.
    Chiolero, Arnaud
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Chiou, Shu-Ti
    Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan.
    Chirita-Emandi, Adela
    Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara, Romania.
    Cho, Belong
    Seoul National University College of Medicine, South Korea.
    Cho, Yumi
    Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, South Korea.
    Christensen, Kaare
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Chudek, Jerzy
    Medical University of Silesia, Poland.
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Claessens, Frank
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
    Clays, Els
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Concin, Hans
    Agency for Preventive and Social Medicine, Austria.
    Cooper, Cyrus
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Cooper, Rachel
    University College London, UK.
    Coppinger, Tara C.
    Cork Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Costanzo, Simona
    IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy.
    Cottel, Dominique
    Institut Pasteur de Lille, France.
    Cowell, Chris
    Westmead University of Sydney, Australia.
    Craig, Cora L.
    Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, Canada.
    Crujeiras, Ana B.
    CIBEROBN, Spain.
    D’Arrigo, Graziella
    National Council of Research, Italy.
    D’Orsi, Eleonora
    Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Dallongeville, Jean
    Institut Pasteur de Lille, France.
    Damasceno, Albertino
    Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique.
    Damsgaard, Camilla T.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dankner, Rachel
    The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Israel.
    Dauchet, Luc
    Lille University and Hospital, France.
    De Backer, Guy
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    de Gaetano, Giovanni
    IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    De Smedt, Delphine
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Deepa, Mohan
    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Deev, Alexander D.
    National Research Centre for Preventive Medicine, Russia.
    Dehghan, Abbas
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Delisle, Hélène
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Delpeuch, Francis
    Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France.
    Deschamps, Valérie
    French Public Health Agency, France.
    Dhana, Klodian
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Di Castelnuovo, Augusto F.
    IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy.
    Dias-Da-costa, Juvenal Soares
    Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, Brazil.
    Diaz, Alejandro
    National Council of Scientific and Technical Research, Argentina.
    Djalalinia, Shirin
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Do, Ha T. P.
    National Institute of Nutrition, Vietnam.
    Dobson, Annette J.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Donfrancesco, Chiara
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy.
    Donoso, Silvana P.
    Universidad de Cuenca, Ecuador.
    Döring, Angela
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Doua, Kouamelan
    Ministère de la Santé et de la Lutte Contre le Sida, Côte d’Ivoire.
    Drygas, Wojciech
    The Cardinal Wyszynski Institute of Cardiology, Poland.
    Dzerve, Vilnis
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Egbagbe, Eruke E.
    University of Benin, Nigeria.
    Eggertsen, Robert
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    El Ati, Jalila
    National Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, Tunisia.
    Elliott, Paul
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Engle-Stone, Reina
    University of California Davis, USA.
    Erasmus, Rajiv T.
    University of Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Erem, Cihangir
    Karadeniz Technical University, Turkey.
    Eriksen, Louise
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Escobedo-De la Peña, Jorge
    Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico.
    Evans, Alun
    The Queen’s University of Belfast, UK.
    Faeh, David
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Fall, Caroline H.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Farzadfar, Farshad
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Felix-Redondo, Francisco J.
    Centro de Salud Villanueva Norte, Spain.
    Ferguson, Trevor S.
    The University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Fernández-Bergés, Daniel
    Hospital Don Benito-Villanueva de la Serena, Spain.
    Ferrante, Daniel
    Ministry of Health, Argentina.
    Ferrari, Marika
    Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Italy.
    Ferreccio, Catterina
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Toulouse University School of Medicine, France.
    Finn, Joseph D.
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Fischer, Krista
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Flores, Eric Monterubio
    Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Mexico.
    Föger, Bernhard
    Agency for Preventive and Social Medicine, Austria.
    Foo, Leng Huat
    Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Forslund, Ann-Sofie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Forsner, Maria
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Fortmann, Stephen P.
    Stanford University, USA.
    Fouad, Heba M.
    World Health Organization Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Egypt.
    Francis, Damian K.
    The University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Franco, Maria Do Carmo
    Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Frontera, Guillermo
    Hospital Universitario Son Espases, Spain.
    Fuchs, Flavio D.
    Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Fuchs, Sandra C.
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Fujita, Yuki
    Kindai University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
    Furusawa, Takuro
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Gaciong, Zbigniew
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Gafencu, Mihai
    Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara, Romania.
    Gareta, Dickman
    University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    Garnett, Sarah P.
    The University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Gaspoz, Jean-Michel
    Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland.
    Gasull, Magda
    CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Spain.
    Gates, Louise
    Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australia.
    Geleijnse, Johanna M.
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Ghasemian, Anoosheh
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Giampaoli, Simona
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Gianfagna, Francesco
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Giovannelli, Jonathan
    Lille University and Hospital, France.
    Giwercman, Aleksander
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Goldsmith, Rebecca A.
    Nutrition Department, Ministry of Health, Israel.
    Gonçalves, Helen
    Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil.
    Gross, Marcela Gonzalez
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Rivas, Juan P. González
    The Andes Clinic of Cardio-Metabolic Studies, Venezuela.
    Gorbea, Mariano Bonet
    National Institute of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Microbiology, Cuba.
    Gottrand, Frederic
    Université de Lille 2, France.
    Graff-Iversen, Sidsel
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Grafnetter, Dušan
    Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic.
    Grajda, Aneta
    Children’s Memorial Health Institute, Poland.
    Grammatikopoulou, Maria G.
    Alexander Technological Educational Institute, Greece.
    Gregor, Ronald D.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Grodzicki, Tomasz
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Grøntved, Anders
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Gruden, Grabriella
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Grujic, Vera
    University of Novi Sad, Serbia.
    Gu, Dongfeng
    National Center of Cardiovascular Diseases, China.
    Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela
    University of Ferrara, Italy.
    Guan, Ong Peng
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Icelandic Heart Association, Iceland.
    Guerrero, Ramiro
    Universidad Icesi, Colombia.
    Guessous, Idris
    Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland.
    Guimaraes, Andre L.
    State University of Montes Claros, Brazil.
    Gulliford, Martin C.
    King’s College London, UK.
    Gunnlaugsdottir, Johanna
    Icelandic Heart Association, Iceland.
    Gunter, Marc
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Guo, Xiuhua
    Capital Medical University, China.
    Guo, Yin
    Capital Medical University, China.
    Gupta, Prakash C.
    Healis-Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, India.
    Gureje, Oye
    University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
    Gurzkowska, Beata
    Children’s Memorial Health Institute, Poland.
    Gutierrez, Laura
    Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy, Argentina.
    Gutzwiller, Felix
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Halkjær, Jytte
    Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Denmark.
    Hambleton, Ian R.
    The University of the West Indies, Barbados.
    Hardy, Rebecca
    University College London, UK.
    Kumar, Rachakulla Hari
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India.
    Hata, Jun
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Hayes, Alison J.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    He, Jiang
    Tulane University, USA.
    Hendriks, Marleen Elisabeth
    Academic Medical Center of University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Cadena, Leticia Hernandez
    National Institute of Public Health, Mexico.
    Herrala, Sauli
    Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Heshmat, Ramin
    Chronic Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Hihtaniemi, Ilpo Tapani
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Ho, Sai Yin
    University of Hong Kong, China.
    Ho, Suzanne C.
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Hobbs, Michael
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hormiga, Claudia M.
    Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander, Colombia.
    Horta, Bernardo L.
    Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil.
    Houti, Leila
    University of Oran 1, Algeria.
    Howitt, Christina
    The University of the West Indies, Barbados.
    Htay, Thein Thein
    Independent Public Health Specialist, Myanmar.
    Htet, Aung Soe
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Htike, Maung Maung Than
    International Realtions Division, Nay Pyi Taw.
    Hu, Yonghua
    Peking University Health Science Center, China.
    Husseini, Abdullatif
    Birzeit University, Palestine.
    Huu, Chinh Nguyen
    National Institute of Nutrition, Vietnam.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, France.
    Hwalla, Nahla
    American University of Beirut, Lebanon.
    Iacoviello, Licia
    IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy.
    Iannone, Anna G.
    Cardiologia di Mercato S. Severino, Italy.
    Ibrahim, Mohsen M.
    Cairo University, Egypt.
    Ikeda, Nayu
    National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Japan.
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Irazola, Vilma E.
    Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy, Argentina.
    Islam, Muhammad
    The Aga Khan University, Pakistan.
    Ivkovic, Vanja
    UHC Zagreb, Croatia.
    Iwasaki, Masanori
    Niigata University, Japan.
    Jackson, Rod T.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Jacobs, Jeremy M.
    Hadassah University Medical Center, Israel.
    Jafar, Tazeen
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Jamil, Kazi M.
    Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait.
    Jamrozik, Konrad
    The University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Janszky, Imre
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Jasienska, Grazyna
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Jelakovic, Bojan
    University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Croatia.
    Jiang, Chao Qiang
    Guangzhou 12th Hospital, China.
    Joffres, Michel
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Johansson, Mattias
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, France.
    Jonas, Jost B.
    Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Jørgensen, Torben
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Joshi, Pradeep
    World Health Organization Country Office, India.
    Juolevi, Anne
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Jurak, Gregor
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Jureša, Vesna
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    German Cancer Research Center, Germany.
    Kafatos, Anthony
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra
    The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Israel.
    Kapantais, Efthymios
    Hellenic Medical Association for Obesity, Greece.
    Kasaeian, Amir
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Katz, Joanne
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA.
    Kaur, Prabhdeep
    National Institute of Epidemiology, India.
    Kavousi, Maryam
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Keil, Ulrich
    University of Münster, Germany.
    Boker, Lital Keinan
    Israel Center for Disease Control, Israel.
    Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka
    Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Kelishadi, Roya
    Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Non Communicable Disease, Iran.
    Kemper, Han CG
    VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Kengne, Andre P.
    South African Medical Research Council, South Africa.
    Kersting, Mathilde
    Research Institute of Child Nutrition, Germany.
    Key, Timothy
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Khader, Yousef Saleh
    Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan.
    Khalili, Davood
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Khang, Young-Ho
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee H.
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Khouw, Ilse M. S. L.
    FrieslandCampina, Singapore.
    Kiechl, Stefan
    Medical University Innsbruck, Austria.
    Killewo, Japhet
    Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Kim, Jeongseon
    National Cancer Center, South Korea.
    Klimont, Jeannette
    Statistics Austria, Austria.
    Klumbiene, Jurate
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Koirala, Bhawesh
    B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Nepal.
    Kolle, Elin
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Kolsteren, Patrick
    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Belgium.
    Korrovits, Paul
    Tartu University Clinics, Estonia.
    Koskinen, Seppo
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Kouda, Katsuyasu
    Kindai University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
    Koziel, Slawomir
    Polish Academy of Sciences Anthropology Unit in Wroclaw, Poland.
    Kratzer, Wolfgang
    University Hospital Ulm, Germany.
    Krokstad, Steinar
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Kromhout, Daan
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Kruger, Herculina S.
    North-West University, South Africa.
    Kubinova, Ruzena
    National Institute of Public Health, Czech Republic.
    Kujala, Urho M.
    University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Kula, Krzysztof
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Kulaga, Zbigniew
    The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, Poland.
    Kumar, R. Krishna
    Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, India.
    Kurjata, Pawel
    The Cardinal Wyszynski Institute of Cardiology, Poland.
    Kusuma, Yadlapalli S.
    All India Institute of Medical Sciences, India.
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Kyobutungi, Catherine
    African Population and Health Research Center, Kenya.
    Laamiri, Fatima Zahra
    Higher Institute of Nursing Professions and Technical Health, Morocco.
    Laatikainen, Tiina
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Lachat, Carl
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Laid, Youcef
    National Institute of Public Health of Algeria, Algeria.
    Lam, Tai Hing
    University of Hong Kong, China.
    Landrove, Orlando
    Ministerio de Salud Pública, Cuba.
    Lanska, Vera
    Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic.
    Lappas, Georg
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden.
    Larijani, Bagher
    Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Iran.
    Laugsand, Lars E.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Bao, Khanh Le Nguyen
    National Institute of Nutrition, Vietnam.
    Le, Tuyen D.
    National Institute of Nutrition, Vietnam.
    Leclercq, Catherine
    Food and Agriculture Organization, Italy.
    Lee, Jeannette
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Lee, Jeonghee
    National Cancer Center, South Korea.
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Lekhraj, Rampal
    Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia.
    León-Muñoz, Luz M.
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Li, Yanping
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA.
    Lilly, Christa L.
    West Virginia University, USA.
    Lim, Wei-Yen
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Lima-Costa, M. Fernanda
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation Rene Rachou Research Institute, Brazil.
    Lin, Hsien-Ho
    National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
    Lin, Xu
    University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Linneberg, Allan
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Lissner, Lauren
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Litwin, Mieczyslaw
    The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, Poland.
    Liu, Jing
    Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, China.
    Lorbeer, Roberto
    University Medicine Greifswald, Germany.
    Lotufo, Paulo A.
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Lozano, José Eugenio
    Consejería de Sanidad Junta de Castilla y León, Spain.
    Luksiene, Dalia
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Lundqvist, Annamari
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Lunet, Nuno
    Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Lytsy, Per
    University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ma, Guansheng
    Peking University, China.
    Ma, Jun
    Peking University, China.
    Machado-Coelho, George LL
    Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Brazil.
    Machi, Suka
    The Jikei University School of Medicine, Japan.
    Maggi, Stefania
    National Research Council, Italy.
    Magliano, Dianna J.
    Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia.
    Maire, Bernard
    Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France.
    Makdisse, Marcia
    Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Brazil.
    Malekzadeh, Reza
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Malhotra, Rahul
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Rao, Kodavanti Mallikharjuna
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India.
    Malyutina, Sofia
    Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Russia.
    Manios, Yannis
    Harokopio University, Greece.
    Mann, Jim I.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Manzato, Enzo
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Margozzini, Paula
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Markey, Oonagh
    University of Reading, UK.
    Marques-Vidal, Pedro
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Marrugat, Jaume
    Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques, Spain.
    Martin-Prevel, Yves
    Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France.
    Martorell, Reynaldo
    Emory University, USA.
    Masoodi, Shariq R.
    Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, India.
    Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Matsha, Tandi E.
    Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa.
    Mazur, Artur
    University of Rzeszow, Poland.
    Mbanya, Jean Claude N.
    University of Yaoundé 1, Cameroon.
    McFarlane, Shelly R.
    The University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    McGarvey, Stephen T.
    Brown University, USA.
    McKee, Martin
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK.
    McLachlan, Stela
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    McLean, Rachael M.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    McNulty, Breige A.
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Yusof, Safiah Md
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.
    Mediene-Benchekor, Sounnia
    University of Oran 1, Algeria.
    Meirhaeghe, Aline
    Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, France.
    Meisinger, Christa
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Menezes, Ana Maria B.
    Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil.
    Mensink, Gert B. M.
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Meshram, Indrapal I.
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India.
    Metspalu, Andres
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Mi, Jie
    Capital Institute of Pediatrics, China.
    Michaelsen, Kim F.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mikkel, Kairit
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Miller, Jody C.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Miquel, Juan Francisco
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Miranda, J. Jaime
    Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Peru.
    Mišigoj-Durakovic, Marjeta
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Mohamed, Mostafa K.
    Ain Shams University, Egypt.
    Mohammad, Kazem
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Mohammadifard, Noushin
    Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran.
    Mohan, Viswanathan
    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Yusoff, Muhammad Fadhli Mohd
    Ministry of Health Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Molbo, Drude
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Møller, Niels C.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Molnár, Dénes
    University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Mondo, Charles K.
    Mulago Hospital, Uganda.
    Monterrubio, Eric A.
    Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Mexico.
    Monyeki, Kotsedi Daniel K.
    University of Limpopo, South Africa.
    Moreira, Leila B.
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Morejon, Alain
    University Medical Science, Cuba.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain.
    Morgan, Karen
    RCSI Dublin, Ireland.
    Mortensen, Erik Lykke
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Moschonis, George
    Harokopio University, Greece.
    Mossakowska, Malgorzata
    International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Poland.
    Mostafa, Aya
    Ain Shams University, Egypt.
    Mota, Jorge
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeel
    Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Motta, Jorge
    Gorgas Memorial Institute of Public Health, Panama.
    Mu, Thet Thet
    Department of Public Health, Myanmar.
    Muiesan, Maria Lorenza
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Müller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Murphy, Neil
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Mursu, Jaakko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Murtagh, Elaine M.
    Mary Immaculate College, Ireland.
    Musa, Kamarul Imran
    Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kota Bharu, Malaysia.
    Musil, Vera
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Nakamura, Harunobu
    Kobe University, Japan.
    Námešná, Jana
    Regional Authority of Public Health, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia.
    Nang, Ei Ei K.
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Nangia, Vinay B.
    Suraj Eye Institute, India.
    Nankap, Martin
    Helen Keller International, Cameroon.
    Narake, Sameer
    Healis-Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, India.
    Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva Maria
    CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Spain.
    Neal, William A.
    West Virginia University, USA.
    Nenko, Ilona
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nervi, Flavio
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Neuhauser, Hannelore K.
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Nguyen, Nguyen D.
    University of Pharmacy and Medicine of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
    Nguyen, Quang Ngoc
    Hanoi Medical University, Vietnam.
    Nieto-Martínez, Ramfis E.
    Universidad Centro-Occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Venezuela.
    Ning, Guang
    Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, China.
    Ninomiya, Toshiharu
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Nishtar, Sania
    Heartfile, Pakistan.
    Noale, Marianna
    National Research Council, Italy.
    Norat, Teresa
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Noto, Davide
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Nsour, Mohannad Al
    Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network, Jordan.
    O’Reilly, Dermot
    The Queen’s University of Belfast, UK.
    Oh, Kyungwon
    Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, South Korea.
    Olayan, Iman H.
    Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait.
    Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo
    University of Vale do Rio dos Sinos, Brazil.
    Oltarzewski, Maciej
    National Food and Nutrition Institute, Poland.
    Omar, Mohd A.
    Ministry of Health Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Onat, Altan
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Ordunez, Pedro
    Pan American Health Organization, USA.
    Ortiz, Ana P.
    University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico.
    Osler, Merete
    Research Center for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Osmond, Clive
    MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, UK.
    Ostojic, Sergej M.
    University of Novi Sad, Serbia.
    Otero, Johanna A.
    Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander, Colombia.
    Overvad, Kim
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Owusu-Dabo, Ellis
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana.
    Paccaud, Fred Michel
    Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, Switzerland.
    Padez, Cristina
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Pahomova, Elena
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Pajak, Andrzej
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Palli, Domenico
    Cancer Prevention and Research Institute, Italy.
    Palloni, Alberto
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA.
    Palmieri, Luigi
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy.
    Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra
    Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Panza, Francesco
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Parnell, Winsome R.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Parsaeian, Mahboubeh
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Pecin, Ivan
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Pednekar, Mangesh S.
    Healis-Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, India.
    Peeters, Petra H.
    University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Peixoto, Sergio Viana
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation Rene Rachou Research Institute, Brazil.
    Peltonen, Markku
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Pereira, Alexandre C.
    Heart Institute, Brazil.
    Pérez, Cynthia M.
    University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico.
    Peters, Annette
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Petkeviciene, Janina
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Peykari, Niloofar
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Pham, Son Thai
    Vietnam National Heart Institute, Vietnam.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Germany.
    Pikhart, Hynek
    University College London, UK.
    Pilav, Aida
    Federal Ministry of Health, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    Pilotto, Lorenza
    Cardiovascular Prevention Centre, Italy.
    Pistelli, Francesco
    University Hospital of Pisa, Italy.
    Pitakaka, Freda
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Piwonska, Aleksandra
    The Cardinal Wyszynski Institute of Cardiology, Poland.
    Plans-Rubió, Pedro
    Public Health Agency of Catalonia, Spain.
    Poh, Bee Koon
    Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Porta, Miquel
    Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques, Spain.
    Portegies, Marileen L. P.
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Poulimeneas, Dimitrios
    Alexander Technological Educational Institute, Greece.
    Pradeepa, Rajendra
    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Prashant, Mathur
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India.
    Price, Jacqueline F.
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Puiu, Maria
    Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara, Romania.
    Punab, Margus
    Tartu University Clinics, Estonia.
    Qasrawi, Radwan F.
    Al-Quds University, Palestine.
    Qorbani, Mostafa
    Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Bao, Tran Quoc
    Ministry of Health, Vietnam.
    Radic, Ivana
    University of Novi Sad, Serbia.
    Radisauskas, Ricardas
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Rahman, Mahmudur
    Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research, Bangladesh.
    Raitakari, Olli
    Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Raj, Manu
    Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, India.
    Rao, Sudha Ramachandra
    National Institute of Epidemiology, India.
    Ramachandran, Ambady
    India Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Ramke, Jacqueline
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Ramos, Rafel
    Institut Universitari d’Investigació en Atenció Primària Jordi Gol, Spain.
    Rampal, Sanjay
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Reganit, Paul Ferdinand M.
    University of the Philippines, Philippines.
    Ribeiro, Robespierre
    Minas Gerais State Secretariat for Health, Brazil.
    Rigo, Fernando
    Health Center San Agustín, Spain.
    de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke
    PharmAccess Foundation, The Netherlands.
    Ritti-Dias, Raphael M.
    Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Brazil.
    Rivera, Juan A.
    Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Mexico.
    Robinson, Sian M.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Robitaille, Cynthia
    Public Health Agency of Canada, Canada.
    Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Perez, María Del Cristo
    Canarian Health Service, Spain.
    Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura A.
    Universidad Industrial de Santander, Colombia.
    Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba
    Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Mexico.
    Rojroongwasinkul, Nipa
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Romaguera, Dora
    CIBEROBN, Spain.
    Ronkainen, Kimmo
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Rosengren, Annika
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rouse, Ian
    Fiji National University, Fiji.
    Rubinstein, Adolfo
    Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy, Argentina.
    Rühli, Frank J.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Rui, Ornelas
    University of Madeira, Portugal.
    Ruiz-Betancourt, Blanca Sandra
    Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico.
    Horimoto, Andrea R. V. Russo
    Heart Institute, Brazil.
    Rutkowski, Marcin
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Sabanayagam, Charumathi
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Sachdev, Harshpal S.
    Sitaram Bhartia Institute of Science and Research, India.
    Saidi, Olfa
    Faculty of medicine of Tunis, Tunisia.
    Salanave, Benoit
    French Public Health Agency, France.
    Martinez, Eduardo Salazar
    National Institute of Public Health, Mexico.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Salonen, Jukka T.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Salvetti, Massimo
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Sánchez-Abanto, Jose
    National Institute of Health, Peru.
    Sandjaja,
    Ministry of Health, Indonesia.
    Sans, Susana
    Catalan Department of Health, Spain.
    Santos, Diana A.
    Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal.
    Santos, Osvaldo
    Institute of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Portugal.
    Dos Santos, Renata Nunes
    University of Sao Paulo Clinics Hospital, Brazil.
    Santos, Rute
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Saramies, Jouko L.
    South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Finland.
    Sardinha, Luis B.
    Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal.
    Sarrafzadegan, Nizal
    Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran.
    Saum, Kai-Uwe
    German Cancer Research Center, Germany.
    Savva, Savvas C.
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Cyprus.
    Scazufca, Marcia
    University of Sao Paulo Clinics Hospital, Brazil.
    Rosario, Angelika Schaffrath
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Schargrodsky, Herman
    Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Schienkiewitz, Anja
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Schmidt, Ida Maria
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Schneider, Ione J.
    Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Schultsz, Constance
    Academic Medical Center of University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Schutte, Aletta E.
    MRC North-West University, South Africa.
    Sein, Aye Aye
    Ministry of Health, Myanmar.
    Sen, Abhijit
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Senbanjo, Idowu O.
    Lagos State University College of Medicine, Nigeria.
    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.
    Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Iran.
    Shalnova, Svetlana A.
    National Research Centre for Preventive Medicine, Russia.
    Sharma, Sanjib K.
    B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Nepal.
    Shaw, Jonathan E.
    Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia.
    Shibuya, Kenji
    The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Shin, Dong Wook
    Seoul National University College of Medicine, South Korea.
    Shin, Youchan
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Shiri, Rahman
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
    Siantar, Rosalynn
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Sibai, Abla M.
    American University of Beirut, Lebanon.
    Silva, Antonio M.
    Federal University of Maranhao, Brazil.
    Silva, Diego Augusto Santos
    Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Simon, Mary
    India Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Simons, Judith
    St Vincent’s Hospital, Australia.
    Simons, Leon A.
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Sjostrom, Michael
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Slusarczyk, Przemyslaw
    International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Poland.
    Smeeth, Liam
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK.
    Smith, Margaret C.
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Snijder, Marieke B.
    Academic Medical Center of University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    So, Hung-Kwan
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Sobngwi, Eugène
    University of Yaoundé 1, Cameroon.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Soekatri, Moesijanti YE
    Health Polytechnics Institute, Indonesia.
    Solfrizzi, Vincenzo
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Song, Yi
    Peking University, China.
    Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Soric, Maroje
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Jérome, Charles Sossa
    Institut Régional de Santé Publique, West Africa.
    Soumare, Aicha
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Staessen, Jan A.
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Starc, Gregor
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Stathopoulou, Maria G.
    INSERM, France.
    Staub, Kaspar
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Stavreski, Bill
    Heart Foundation, Australia.
    Steene-Johannessen, Jostein
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Stehle, Peter
    Bonn University, Germany.
    Stein, Aryeh D.
    Emory University, USA.
    Stergiou, George S.
    Sotiria Hospital, Greece.
    Stessman, Jochanan
    Hadassah University Medical Center, Israel.
    Stieber, Jutta
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Stöckl, Doris
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Stokwiszewski, Jakub
    National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Poland.
    Stratton, Gareth
    Swansea University, UK.
    Stronks, Karien
    University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Strufaldi, Maria Wany
    Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Sun, Chien-An
    Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sung, Yn-Tz
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Sunyer, Jordi
    ISGlobal Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Spain.
    Suriyawongpaisal, Paibul
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Swinburn, Boyd A.
    The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Sy, Rody G.
    University of the Philippines, Philippines.
    Szponar, Lucjan
    National Food and Nutrition Institute, Poland.
    Tai, E. Shyong
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Tammesoo, Mari-Liis
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Tamosiunas, Abdonas
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Tang, Line
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Tang, Xun
    Peking University Health Science Center, China.
    Tanser, Frank
    University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    Tao, Yong
    Peking University, China.
    Tarawneh, Mohammed Rasoul
    Ministry of Health, Jordan.
    Tarp, Jakob
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Tarqui-Mamani, Carolina B.
    National Institute of Health, Peru.
    Taylor, Anne
    The University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Tchibindat, Félicité
    UNICEF, Cameroon.
    Theobald, Holger
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Thijs, Lutgarde
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Thuesen, Betina H.
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Denmark.
    Tolonen, Hanna K.
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Tolstrup, Janne S.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Topbas, Murat
    Karadeniz Technical University, Turkey.
    Topór-Madry, Roman
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Torrent, Maties
    IB-SALUT Area de Salut de Menorca, Spain.
    Toselli, Stefania
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Traissac, Pierre
    Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Hellenic Health Foundation, Greece.
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA.
    Trinh, Oanh T. H.
    University of Pharmacy and Medicine of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
    Trivedi, Atul
    Government Medical College, India.
    Tshepo, Lechaba
    Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, South Africa.
    Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.
    The University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Dasman Diabetes Institute, Kuwait.
    Turley, Maria L.
    Ministry of Health, New Zealand.
    Tynelius, Per
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Tzotzas, Themistoklis
    Hellenic Medical Association for Obesity, Greece.
    Tzourio, Christophe
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Ueda, Peter
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA.
    Ukoli, Flora A. M.
    Meharry Medical College, USA.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Unal, Belgin
    Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey.
    Uusitalo, Hannu M. T.
    University of Tampere Tays Eye Center, Finland.
    Valdivia, Gonzalo
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Vale, Susana
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Valvi, Damaskini
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA.
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Van Herck, Koen
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Van Minh, Hoang
    Hanoi School of Public Health, Vietnam.
    van Rossem, Lenie
    University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    van Valkengoed, Irene GM
    Academic Medical Center of University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Vanderschueren, Dirk
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
    Vanuzzo, Diego
    Centro di Prevenzione Cardiovascolare Udine, Italy.
    Vatten, Lars
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Vega, Tomas
    Consejería de Sanidad Junta de Castilla y León, Spain.
    Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo
    Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Veronesi, Giovanni
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Verschuren, WM Monique
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands.
    Verstraeten, Roosmarijn
    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Belgium.
    Victora, Cesar G.
    Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil.
    Viegi, Giovanni
    Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Viet, Lucie
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands.
    Viikari-Juntura, Eira
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
    Vineis, Paolo
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Vioque, Jesus
    Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Spain.
    Virtanen, Jyrki K.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Visvikis-Siest, Sophie
    INSERM, France.
    Viswanathan, Bharathi
    Ministry of Health, Seychelles.
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Voutilainen, Sari
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Vrdoljak, Ana
    UHC Zagreb, Croatia.
    Vrijheid, Martine
    ISGlobal Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Spain.
    Wade, Alisha N.
    University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.
    Wagner, Aline
    University of Strasbourg, France.
    Walton, Janette
    University College Cork, Ireland.
    Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon Wan
    Institute for Medical Research, Malaysia.
    Wang, Ming-Dong
    Public Health Agency of Canada, Canada.
    Wang, Qian
    Xinjiang Medical University, China.
    Wang, Ya Xing
    Beijing Tongren Hospital, China.
    Wannamethee, S. Goya
    University College London, UK.
    Wareham, Nicholas
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Weerasekera, Deepa
    Ministry of Health, New Zealand.
    Whincup, Peter H.
    St George’s, University of London, UK.
    Widhalm, Kurt
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Widyahening, Indah S.
    Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia.
    Wiecek, Andrzej
    Medical University of Silesia, Poland.
    Wijga, Alet H.
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands.
    Wilks, Rainford J.
    The University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Willeit, Johann
    Medical University Innsbruck, Austria.
    Wilsgaard, Tom
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Poland.
    Wong, Jyh Eiin
    Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Wong, Tien Yin
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Woo, Jean
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Woodward, Mark
    University of Sydney, Australia; University of Oxford, UK.
    Wu, Frederick C.
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Wu, Jianfeng
    Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China.
    Wu, Shou Ling
    Kailuan General Hospital, China.
    Xu, Haiquan
    Institute of Food and Nutrition Development of Ministry of Agriculture, China.
    Xu, Liang
    Capital Medical University, China.
    Yamborisut, Uruwan
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Yan, Weili
    Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, China.
    Yang, Xiaoguang
    Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China.
    Yardim, Nazan
    Ministry of Health, Turkey.
    Ye, Xingwang
    University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Yiallouros, Panayiotis K.
    University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Yoshihara, Akihiro
    Niigata University, Japan.
    You, Qi Sheng
    Capital Medical University, China.
    Younger-Coleman, Novie O.
    The University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Yusoff, Ahmad F.
    Ministry of Health Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Zainuddin, Ahmad A.
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.
    Zambon, Sabina
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Zdrojewski, Tomasz
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Zeng, Yi
    Duke University, USA.
    Zhao, Dong
    Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, China.
    Zhao, Wenhua
    Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China.
    Zheng, Yingfeng
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Zhou, Maigeng
    Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China.
    Zhu, Dan
    Ministry of Health, Turkey.
    Zimmermann, Esther
    University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Cisneros, Julio Zuñiga
    Gorgas Memorial Institute of Public Health, Panama.
    A century of trends in adult human height2016In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 5, article id e13410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3– 19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8– 144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.

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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Blix, Bodil H.
    et al.
    Department of health and care sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway; Faculty of education, arts and sports, Western Norway University of Applied Science, Norway.
    Emelyanova, Anastasia
    Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Olafsdottir, Steinunn A.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Rautio, Arja
    Arctic Health, Biomedicine and Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland; University of the Arctic, Finland.
    Age-inclusive communities and outdoor spaces in the Arctic: Omissions in national policies2024Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bota, András
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab. Integrated Science Lab, Department of Physics, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Martin
    Integrated Science Lab, Department of Physics, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gardner, Lauren
    Department of Civil and Systems Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21218, USA.
    Rosvall, Martin
    Integrated Science Lab, Department of Physics, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden.
    Socioeconomic and environmental patterns behind H1N1 spreading in Sweden2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, article id 22512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the critical factors related to influenza spreading is crucial in predicting and mitigating epidemics. Specifically, uncovering the relationship between epidemic onset and various risk indicators such as socioeconomic, mobility and climate factors can reveal locations and travel patterns that play critical roles in furthering an outbreak. We study the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza outbreaks in Sweden’s municipalities between 2009 and 2015 and use the Generalized Inverse Infection Method (GIIM) to assess the most significant contributing risk factors. GIIM represents an epidemic spreading process on a network: nodes correspond to geographical objects, links indicate travel routes, and transmission probabilities assigned to the links guide the infection process. Our results reinforce existing observations that the influenza outbreaks considered in this study were driven by the country’s largest population centers, while meteorological factors also contributed significantly. Travel and other socioeconomic indicators have a negligible effect. We also demonstrate that by training our model on the 2009 outbreak, we can predict the epidemic onsets in the following five seasons with high accuracy.

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    fulltext
  • 13.
    Bridgwater, Alexander
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Bóta, András
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Identifying regions most likely to contribute to an epidemic outbreak in a human mobility network2021In: 2021 Swedish Artificial Intelligence Society Workshop (SAIS), IEEE, 2021, p. 1-4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of modelling the spreading of infectious diseases as part of a public health strategy has been highlighted by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. This includes identifying the geographical areas or travel routes most likely to contribute to the spreading of an outbreak. These areas and routes can then be monitored as part of an early warning system, be part of intervention strategies, e.g. lockdowns, aiming to mitigate the spreading of the disease or be a focus of vaccination campaigns.

    In this paper we present our work in developing a network-based infection model between the municipalities of Sweden in order to identify the areas most likely to contribute to an epidemic. We first construct a human mobility model based on the well-known radiation model, then we employ a network-based compartmental model to simulate epidemic outbreaks with various parameters. Finally, we adopt the influence maximization problem known in network science to identify the municipalities having the largest impact on the spreading of infectious diseases.

    We only present the first part of our work in this paper. In the future, we plan to investigate the robustness of our model in identifying high-risk areas by simulating outbreaks with various parameters. We also plan to extend our work to selecting the most likely infection paths contributing to the spreading of infectious diseases.

  • 14.
    Burgueño, Rafael
    et al.
    Department of Education, University of Almeria, Almeria, Spain.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Chillon, Palma
    PROFITH "PROmoting FITness and Health Through Physical Activity" Research Group, Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Basic psychological need satisfaction in active commuting to and from school BPNS-ACS(SWE)2023In: Journal of Transport & Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1413, Vol. 30, article id 101618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The absence of appropriate Swedish-language instrumentation to assess active commuting to school has largely hampered the study of the individual factors of the children, such as autonomy, competence, and relatedness to active commuting to school.

    Purpose

    Building upon self-determination theory, the objective of this research was to gather evidence of the validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the Basic Psychological Need Satisfaction in Active Commuting to and from School (BPNS-ACS) tool.

    Methods

    The cross-sectional and purposive sample included 273 children (51.28% girls) from urban areas.

    Results

    Confirmatory factor analysis underpinned the three-factor correlated model, which was invariant across gender. Evidence in support of discriminant and convergent validity and reliability was gathered. Criterion validity evidence was met by positive and significant predictions of autonomy, competence, and relatedness satisfaction on active commuting to and from school.

    Conclusions

    The Swedish version of the BPNS-ACS is a psychometrically robust measure of children’s perceptions of autonomy, competence, and relatedness satisfaction in active commuting to school and could be used to assess the effects of school-based interventions on need satisfaction for active commuting to school.

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  • 15.
    Burgueño, Rafael
    et al.
    Faculty of Education, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; Health Research Centre, University of Almeria, Almeria, Spain.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Pauelsen, Mascha
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Chillon, Palma
    PROFITH “PROmoting FITness and Health Through Physical Activity” Research Group, Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Adapting the behavioral regulation in active commuting to and from school questionnaire in Sweden: BR-ACS(SWE)2022In: Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, ISSN 2590-1982, Vol. 16, article id 100721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although growing attention has been paid to motivation in explaining active travel to school among young people at the international level, no measures of motivation for active commuting to school (ACS) were found in Sweden. Guided by self-determination theory, this research aimed to adapt the Behavioral Regulation in Active Commuting to and from School (BR-ACS) questionnaire to the Swedish context and test the resulting version’s psychometric properties. The purposive and cross-sectional sample included 273 students (58 % girls, aged 10–12 years) from four Swedish urban schools. Results from confirmatory factor analyses psychometrically supported the six-factor correlated model (intrinsic motivation, integrated regulation, identified regulation, introjected regulation, external regulation, and amotivation) and the hierarchical three-factor model (autonomous, controlled motivation, and amotivation), which were invariant across gender. Latent correlations underpinned a symplex-like pattern. Discriminant and convergent validity and reliability were gathered. Criterion validity evidence was met with positive associations from intrinsic motivation, integrated and identified regulation to ACS, and a negative relationship between amotivation and ACS. The Swedish version of the BR-ACS questionnaire is a valid and reliable measure of children’s motivation toward ACS.

  • 16.
    Burman, Pia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lidén, Lina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Vägen tillbaka: från utmattning till ökat välmående: - en kvalitativ studie av utmattade kvinnors berättelser2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today there is a major problem with stress in society where many suffer from burnout, especially women. It is of great importance to find ways to work with this in a health-promoting way to reduce these problems. The purpose of the study was to describe women's experiences of self-chosen health promoting activities that helped them feel better. The study was conducted with a manifest content analysis where data was gathered through written reflections. The participants wrote down their personal stories based on the open sentence "Now I will tell you about what helped me feel better in relation to my burnout/stress ...". The result was formulated into three subcategories and one main category. The main category was named "The way towards better wellbeing: through restoration, activities and acceptance" and the subcategories were "Realized the importance of sleep, recovery and rest", "Performed activities that made you feel good" and "Adjusted life to new conditions". The result showed that what was in common for the participants was the process they had gone through from fatigue to increased well-being. Their journey started with sleep, then they added health promoting activities and landed in acceptance and adaptation to the new life situation. The result also showed that there is no universal solution. What different people need to maintain a balance and feel good is individual. In order to achieve a greater balance, a broad approach to health is required, where a number of factors can cooperate for a greater well-being.

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  • 17.
    Carson, Richard T.
    et al.
    University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Hanemann, Michael
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Köhlin, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adamowicz, Wiktor
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
    Sterner, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alpizar, Francisco
    Wageningen University and Research, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Khossravi, Emily A.
    University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Jeuland, Marc
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bonilla, Jorge A.
    Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
    Tan-Soo, Jie-Sheng
    National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
    Nam, Pham Khanh
    University of Economics, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
    Ndiritu, Simon Wagura
    Strathmore University, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wadehra, Shivani
    Ashoka University, Noida, India.
    Chegere, Martin Julius
    University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Visser, Martine
    University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Chukwuone, Nnaemeka Andegbe
    University of Nigeria Nsukka, Nsukka, Nigeria.
    Whittington, Dale
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Perceptions of the seriousness of major public health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in seven middle-income countries2023In: Communications Medicine, E-ISSN 2730-664X, Vol. 3, article id 193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Public perception of the seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic compared to six other major public health problems (alcoholism and drug use, HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, lung cancer and respiratory diseases caused by air pollution and smoking, and water-borne diseases like diarrhea) is unclear. We designed a survey to examine this issue using YouGov’s internet panels in seven middle-income countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America in early 2022.

    Methods

    Respondents rank ordered the seriousness of the seven health problems using a repeated best-worst question format. Rank-ordered logit models allow comparisons within and across countries and assessment of covariates.

    Results

    In six of the seven countries, respondents perceived other respiratory illnesses to be a more serious problem than COVID-19. Only in Vietnam was COVID-19 ranked above other respiratory illnesses. Alcoholism and drug use was ranked the second most serious problem in the African countries. HIV/AIDS ranked relatively high in all countries. Covariates, particularly a COVID-19 knowledge scale, explained differences within countries; statistics about the pandemic were highly correlated with differences in COVID-19’s perceived seriousness.

    Conclusions

    People in the seven middle-income countries perceived COVID-19 to be serious (on par with HIV/AIDS) but not as serious as other respiratory illnesses. In the African countries, respondents perceived alcoholism and drug use as more serious than COVID-19. Our survey-based approach can be used to quickly understand how the threat of a newly emergent disease, like COVID-19, fits into the larger context of public perceptions of the seriousness of health problems.

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  • 18.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Zetterkvist, Sandra
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Social life and use of an Arctic city centre during the COVID-19 pandemic2023In: Arctic Yearbook, ISSN 2298-2418, p. 185-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From March 2020, regulations and recommendations were implemented in Sweden to reduce the spread of COVID-19, which included limitations to public life. Overall, these sought to reduce activities that brought people together and in so doing, transitioned the relationship between cities and people into a new paradigm.

    The study explores public usage of an Arctic city during the pandemic to understand how COVID-19 altered people’s ‘social life’. Data was collected in the Arctic city of Luleå, by structured questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. These indicate that: 1) a significant reduction in city visits, 2) multi-faceted city visits were reduced to single task based visits, 3) a significant reduction in leisure based activities, 4) an increase in digitalization of work, retail and leisure activities, 5) perceptions of responsibility, guilt, boredom and minimizing social networks were reported, and 6) post-pandemic, people questioned the ability of cities to bounce back.

    The survey and interviews show that in the Arctic city of Luleå, restrictions put in place to reduce spread of the infection had a significant impact on public life and use of the public realm, which is in accordance with research from outside the Arctic.

    The conclusion is that in the short term, the role of urban centres in daily life was reduced and the role of digitalisation for work, goods and services was rapidly advanced. However, the research also shows that the ‘social dimension’ of Arctic cities - to see other people and take part of civic life on site - was not easy to replace and is valued by the community.

  • 19.
    Chau, Pui Hing
    et al.
    School of Nursing, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
    Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Qian, Xing Xing
    School of Nursing, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
    Luo, Hao
    Department of Social Work and Social Administration, Faculty of Social Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
    Woo, Jean
    Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
    Visits to the accident and emergency department in hot season of a city with subtropical climate: association with heat stress and related meteorological variables2022In: International journal of biometeorology, ISSN 0020-7128, E-ISSN 1432-1254, Vol. 66, no 10, p. 1955-1971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Literature reporting the association between heat stress defined by universal thermal climate index (UTCI) and emergency department visits is mainly conducted in Europe. This study aimed to investigate the association between heat stress, as defined by the UTCI, and visits to the accident and emergency department (AED) in Hong Kong, which represents a subtropical climate region.

    Methods A retrospective study involving 13,438,846 AED visits in the public sector from May 2000 to September 2016, excluding 2003 and 2009, was conducted in Hong Kong. Age-sex-specific ANCOVA models of daily AED rates on heat stress and prolonged heat stress, adjusting for air quality, prolonged poor air quality, typhoon, rainstorm, year, day of the week, public holiday, summer vacation, and fee charging, were used.

    Results On a day with strong heat stress (32.1 °C ≤ UTCI ≤ 38.0 °C), the AED visit rate (per 100,000) increased by 0.9 (95% CI: 0.5, 1.3) and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.3, 2.1) for females and males aged 19–64 and 4.1 (95% CI: 2.7, 5.4) and 4.1 (95% CI: 2.6, 5.6) for females and males aged ≥ 65, while keeping other variables constant. On a day with very strong heat stress (38.1 °C ≤ UTCI ≤ 46.0 °C), the corresponding rates increased by 0.6 (95% CI: 0.1, 1.2), 2.2 (95% CI: 1.7, 2.7), 4.9 (95% CI: 3.1, 6.7), and 4.7 (95% CI: 2.7, 6.6), respectively. The effect size of heat stress associated with AED visit rates was negligible among those aged ≤ 18. Heat stress showed the greatest effect size for males aged 19–64 among all subgroups.

    Conclusion Biothermal condition from heat stress was associated with the health of the citizens in a city with a subtropical climate and reflected in the increase of daily AED visit. Public health recommendations have been made accordingly for the prevention of heat-related AED visits.

  • 20.
    de Lange, Annet H.
    et al.
    Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht & Open University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Psychology, Campus Industrial de Ferrol, Universidade da Coruña, Ferrol, Spain; Department of Psychology. Trondheim, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway; Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Teoh, Kevin
    Organisational Psychology, Birkbeck Business School, University of London, London, UK.
    Fleuren, Bram
    Department of Work and Social Psychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Christensen, Marit
    Department of Psychology. Trondheim, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway; Department of Psychology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Rena, Norway.
    Medisauskaite, Asta
    Medical School, UCL, London, UK.
    Løvseth, Lise T.
    Clinic of Mental Health, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Solms, Lara
    Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Reig-Botella, Adela
    Department of Psychology, Campus Industrial de Ferrol, Universidade da Coruña, Ferrol, Spain.
    Brulin, Emma
    Unite of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Innstrand, Siw Tone
    Department of Psychology. Trondheim, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Lundmark, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology. Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    van Dorssen, Pauline
    Intrinzis, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Bååthe, Fredrik
    Institute for Studies of the Medical Profession, LEFO, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Stress Medicine at Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heijkants, Ceciel
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Furunes, Trude
    Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Correia, Isabel
    CIS- Iscte, Iscte-Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Opportunities and challenges in designing and evaluating complex multilevel, multi-stakeholder occupational health interventions in practice2024In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, E-ISSN 1464-5335Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Di Cesare, Mariachiara
    et al.
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom.
    Bentham, James
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Stevens, Gretchen A.
    World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Zhou, Bin
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Danaei, Goodarz
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, United States.
    Lu, Yuan
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, United States.
    Bixby, Honor
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Cowan, Melanie J.
    World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Riley, Leanne M.
    World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Hajifathalian, Kaveh
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, United States.
    Fortunato, Léa
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Taddei, Cristina
    University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
    Bennett, James E.
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Ikeda, Nayu
    National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo, Japan.
    Khang, Young-Ho
    Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Kyobutungi, Catherine
    African Population and Health Research Center, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Laxmaiah, Avula
    Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
    Li, Yanping
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, United States.
    Lin, Hsien-Ho
    National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Miranda, J. Jaime
    Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
    Mostafa, Aya
    Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.
    Turley, Maria L.
    Ministry of Health, Wellington, New Zealand.
    Paciorek, Christopher J.
    University of California, Berkeley, United States.
    Gunter, Marc
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Ezzati, Majid
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Abdeen, Ziad A.
    Al-Quds University, Palestine.
    Hamid, Zargar Abdul
    Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Care, India.
    Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M.
    Birzeit University, Palestine.
    Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin
    Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico.
    Adams, Robert
    University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Aekplakorn, Wichai
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.
    Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutricion, Mexico.
    Ahmadvand, Alireza
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Germany.
    Ali, Mohamed M.
    World Health Organization Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Egypt.
    Alkerwi, Ala'a
    Luxembourg Institute of Health, Luxembourg.
    Alvarez-Pedrerol, Mar
    Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Spain.
    Aly, Eman
    World Health Organization Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Egypt.
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Lille University and Hospital, France.
    Amuzu, Antoinette
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.
    Andersen, Lars Bo
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Anderssen, Sigmund A.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Andrade, Dolores S.
    Universidad de Cuenca, Ecuador.
    Anjana, Ranjit Mohan
    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer
    National Institute of Public Health, Tunisia.
    Ariansen, Inger
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Aris, Tahir
    Ministry of Health, Malaysia.
    Arlappa, Nimmathota
    Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
    Arveiler, Dominique
    Strasbourg University and Hospital, France.
    Assah, Felix K.
    University of Yaoundé 1, Cameroon.
    Avdicová, Mária
    Regional Authority of Public Health, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia.
    Azizi, Fereidoun
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Babu, Bontha V.
    Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
    Balakrishna, Nagalla
    Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
    Bandosz, Piotr
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Banegas, José R.
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Barbagallo, Carlo M.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Barceló, Alberto
    Pan American Health Organization, United States.
    Barkat, Amina
    Université Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco.
    Barros, Mauro V.
    University of Pernambuco, Brazil.
    Bata, Iqbal
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Batieha, Anwar M.
    Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan.
    Batista, Rosangela L.
    Federal University of Maranhao, Brazil.
    Baur, Louise A.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Beaglehole, Robert
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Romdhane, Habiba Ben
    University Tunis El Manar, Tunisia.
    Benet, Mikhail
    University Medical Science, Cuba.
    Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio
    Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
    Bernotiene, Gailute
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Bettiol, Heloisa
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Bhagyalaxmi, Aroor
    B.J. Medical College, India.
    Bharadwaj, Sumit
    Chirayu Medical College, India.
    Bhargava, Santosh K.
    Sunder Lal Jain Hospital, India.
    Bhatti, Zaid
    Aga Khan University, Pakistan.
    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.
    Aga Khan University, Pakistan.
    Bi, HongSheng
    Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China.
    Bi, Yufang
    Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, School of Medicine, China.
    Bjerregaard, Peter
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; University of Greenland, Greenland.
    Bjertness, Espen
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Bjertness, Marius B.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blake, Margaret
    NatCen Social Research, United Kingdom.
    Blokstra, Anneke
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Netherlands.
    Bo, Simona
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Bobak, Martin
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Boddy, Lynne M.
    Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom.
    Boehm, Bernhard O.
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Boeing, Heiner
    German Institute of Human Nutrition, Germany.
    Boissonnet, Carlos P.
    CEMIC, Argentina.
    Bongard, Vanina
    Toulouse University, School of Medicine, France.
    Bovet, Pascal
    Ministry of Health, Seychelles; University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Braeckman, Lutgart
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Bragt, Marjolijn C.E.
    FrieslandCampina, Singapore.
    Brajkovich, Imperia
    Universidad Central de Venezuela, Venezuela.
    Branca, Francesco
    World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Breckenkamp, Juergen
    Bielefeld University, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Cancer Research Center, Germany.
    Brewster, Lizzy M.
    University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Netherlands.
    Brian, Garry R.
    Fred Hollows Foundation New Zealand, New Zealand.
    Bruno, Graziella
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. B.
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Netherlands.
    Bugge, Anna
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Burns, Con
    Cork Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    De León, Antonio Cabrera
    University La Laguna, Spain.
    Cacciottolo, Joseph
    University of Malta, Malta.
    Cama, Tilema
    Ministry of Health, Tonga.
    Cameron, Christine
    Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, Canada.
    Camolas, José
    Hospital Santa Maria, CHLN, Portugal.
    Can, Günay
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Cândido, Ana Paula C.
    Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Capuano, Vincenzo
    Cardiologia di Mercato S. Severino, Italy.
    Cardoso, Viviane C.
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Carvalho, Maria J.
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Casanueva, Felipe F.
    Santiago de Compostela University, Spain.
    Casas, Juan-Pablo
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Caserta, Carmelo A.
    Associazione Calabrese di Epatologia, Italy.
    Castetbon, Katia
    French Institute for Health Surveillance, France.
    Chamukuttan, Snehalatha
    India Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Chan, Angelique W.
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Chan, Queenie
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Chaturvedi, Himanshu K.
    National Institute of Medical Statistics, India.
    Chaturvedi, Nishi
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Chen, Chien-Jen
    Academia Sinica, Taiwan.
    Chen, Fangfang
    Capital Institute of Pediatrics, China.
    Chen, Huashuai
    Duke University, United States.
    Chen, Shuohua
    Kailuan General Hospital, China.
    Chen, Zhengming
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Cheng, Ching-Yu
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Chetrit, Angela
    Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Israel.
    Chiolero, Arnaud
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Chiou, Shu-Ti
    Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan.
    Chirita-Emandi, Adela
    Victor Babeş University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania.
    Cho, Yumi
    Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, South Korea.
    Christensen, Kaare
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Chudek, Jerzy
    Medical University of Silesia, Poland.
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Claessens, Frank
    Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium.
    Clays, Els
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Concin, Hans
    Agency for Preventive and Social Medicine, Austria.
    Cooper, Cyrus
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Cooper, Rachel
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Coppinger, Tara C.
    Cork Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Costanzo, Simona
    IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy.
    Cottel, Dominique
    Institut Pasteur de Lille, France.
    Cowell, Chris
    Westmead University of Sydney, Australia.
    Craig, Cora L.
    Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, Canada.
    Crujeiras, Ana B.
    CIBEROBN, Spain.
    D'Arrigo, Graziella
    National Council of Research, Italy.
    D'Orsi, Eleonora
    Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Dallongeville, Jean
    Institut Pasteur de Lille, France.
    Damasceno, Albertino
    Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique.
    Damsgaard, Camilla T.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dankner, Rachel
    Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Israel.
    Dauchet, Luc
    Lille University Hospital, France.
    De Backer, Guy
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    De Gaetano, Giovanni
    IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    De Smedt, Delphine
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Deepa, Mohan
    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Deev, Alexander D.
    National Research Centre for Preventive Medicine, Russian Federation.
    Dehghan, Abbas
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Delisle, Hélène
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Delpeuch, Francis
    Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France.
    Dhana, Klodian
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Di Castelnuovo, Augusto F.
    IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy.
    Dias-Da-Costa, Juvenal Soares
    Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, Brazil.
    Diaz, Alejandro
    National Council of Scientific and Technical Research, Argentina.
    Djalalinia, Shirin
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Do, Ha T.P.
    National Institute of Nutrition, Viet Nam.
    Dobson, Annette J.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Donfrancesco, Chiara
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy.
    Döring, Angela
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Doua, Kouamelan
    Ministère de la Santé et de la Lutte Contre le Sida, Cote d'Ivoire.
    Drygas, Wojciech
    Cardinal Wyszynski Institute of Cardiology, Poland.
    Egbagbe, Eruke E.
    University of Benin, College of Medical Sciences, Nigeria.
    Eggertsen, Robert
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    El Ati, Jalila
    National Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, Tunisia.
    Elliott, Paul
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Engle-Stone, Reina
    University of California, Davis, United States.
    Erasmus, Rajiv T.
    University of Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Erem, Cihangir
    Karadeniz Technical University, Turkey.
    Eriksen, Louise
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    De La Peña, Jorge Escobedo
    Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico.
    Evans, Alun
    Queen's University of Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Faeh, David
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Fall, Caroline H.
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Farzadfar, Farshad
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Felix-Redondo, Francisco J.
    Centro de Salud Villanueva Norte, Spain.
    Ferguson, Trevor S.
    University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Fernández-Bergés, Daniel
    Hospital Don Benito-Villanueva de la Serena, Spain.
    Ferrante, Daniel
    Ministry of Health, Argentina.
    Ferrari, Marika
    Council for Agriculture Research and Economics, Italy.
    Ferreccio, Catterina
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Toulouse University, School of Medicine, France.
    Finn, Joseph D.
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Fischer, Krista
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Flores, Eric Monterubio
    Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Mexico.
    Föger, Bernhard
    Agency for Preventive and Social Medicine, Austria.
    Foo, Leng Huat
    Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kota Bharu, Malaysia.
    Forslund, Ann-Sofie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Fortmann, Stephen P.
    Stanford University, United States.
    Fouad, Heba M.
    WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Egypt.
    Francis, Damian K.
    University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Do Carmo Franco, Maria
    Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Frontera, Guillermo
    Hospital Universitario, Son Espases, Spain.
    Fuchs, Flavio D.
    Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Fuchs, Sandra C.
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Fujita, Yuki
    Kinki University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
    Furusawa, Takuro
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Gaciong, Zbigniew
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Gafencu, Mihai
    Victor Babeş University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania.
    Gareta, Dickman
    University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    Garnett, Sarah P.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Gaspoz, Jean-Michel
    Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland.
    Gasull, Magda
    CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Spain.
    Gates, Louise
    Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australia.
    Geleijnse, Johanna M.
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Ghasemian, Anoosheh
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Giampaoli, Simona
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy.
    Gianfagna, Francesco
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Giovannelli, Jonathan
    Lille University Hospital, France.
    Giwercman, Aleksander
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Goldsmith, Rebecca A.
    Nutrition Department, Ministry of Health, Israel.
    Gross, Marcela Gonzalez
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Rivas, Juan P. González
    Andes Clinic of Cardio-Metabolic Studies, Venezuela.
    Gorbea, Mariano Bonet
    National Institute of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Microbiology, Cuba.
    Gottrand, Frederic
    Université de Lille 2, France.
    Graff-Iversen, Sidsel
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Grafnetter, Dušan
    Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic.
    Grajda, Aneta
    Children's Memorial Health Institute, Poland.
    Grammatikopoulou, Maria G.
    Alexander Technological Educational Institute, Greece.
    Gregor, Ronald D.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Grodzicki, Tomasz
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Grøntved, Anders
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Gruden, Grabriella
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Grujic, Vera
    Institute of Public Health of Vojvodina, Serbia.
    Gu, Dongfeng
    National Center of Cardiovascular Diseases, China.
    Guan, Ong Peng
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Icelandic Heart Association, Iceland.
    Guerrero, Ramiro
    Universidad Icesi, Colombia.
    Guessous, Idris
    Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland.
    Guimaraes, Andre L.
    State University of Montes Claros, Brazil.
    Gulliford, Martin C.
    King's College London, United Kingdom.
    Gunnlaugsdottir, Johanna
    Icelandic Heart Association, Iceland.
    Guo, Xiu H.
    Capital Medical University, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, China.
    Guo, Yin
    Capital Medical University, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, China.
    Gupta, Prakash C.
    Healis-Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, India.
    Gureje, Oye
    University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
    Gurzkowska, Beata
    Children's Memorial Health Institute, Poland.
    Gutierrez, Laura
    Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy, Argentina.
    Gutzwiller, Felix
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Halkjær, Jytte
    Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Denmark.
    Hardy, Rebecca
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Kumar, Rachakulla Hari
    Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
    Hayes, Alison J.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    He, Jiang
    Tulane University, United States.
    Hendriks, Marleen Elisabeth
    University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Netherlands.
    Cadena, Leticia Hernandez
    National Institute of Public Health, Mexico.
    Heshmat, Ramin
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Hihtaniemi, Ilpo Tapani
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Ho, Sai Yin
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Ho, Suzanne C.
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Hobbs, Michael
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Hormiga, Claudia M.
    Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander, Colombia.
    Horta, Bernardo L.
    Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil.
    Houti, Leila
    University of Oran 1, Algeria.
    Htay, Thein Thein
    Ministry of Health, Myanmar.
    Htet, Aung Soe
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Htike, Maung Maung Than
    Ministry of Health, Myanmar.
    Hu, Yonghua
    Peking University, Health Science Center, China.
    Hussieni, Abdullatif S.
    Birzeit University, Palestine.
    Huu, Chinh Nguyen
    National Institute of Nutrition, Viet Nam.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, France.
    Hwalla, Nahla
    American University of Beirut, Lebanon.
    Iacoviello, Licia
    IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy.
    Iannone, Anna G.
    Cardiologia di Mercato S. Severino, Italy.
    Ibrahim, M. Mohsen
    Cairo University, Egypt.
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Irazola, Vilma E.
    Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy, Argentina.
    Islam, Muhammad
    Aga Khan University, Pakistan.
    Iwasaki, Masanori
    Niigata University, Japan.
    Jackson, Rod T.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Jacobs, Jeremy M.
    Hadassah University Medical Center, Israel.
    Jafar, Tazeen
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Jamil, Kazi M.
    Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait.
    Jamrozik, Konrad
    University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Jasienska, Grazyna
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Jiang, Chao Qiang
    Guangzhou 12th Hospital, China.
    Joffres, Michel
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Johansson, Mattias
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, France.
    Jonas, Jost B.
    Ruprecht-Karls University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Jørgensen, Torben
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Joshi, Pradeep
    World Health Organization Country Office, India.
    Juolevi, Anne
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Jurak, Gregor
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Jureša, Vesna
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    German Cancer Research Center, Germany.
    Kafatos, Anthony
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra
    Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Israel.
    Kapantais, Efthymios
    Hellenic Medical Association for Obesity, Greece.
    Kasaeian, Amir
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Katz, Joanne
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States.
    Kaur, Prabhdeep
    National Institute of Epidemiology, India.
    Kavousi, Maryam
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Keil, Ulrich
    University of Münster, Germany.
    Boker, Lital Keinan
    University of Haifa, Israel.
    Kelishadi, Roya
    Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Non-Communicable Disease, Iran.
    Kemper, Han H.C.G.
    VU University Medical Center, Netherlands.
    Kengne, Andre P.
    South African Medical Research Council, South Africa.
    Kersting, Mathilde
    Research Institute of Child Nutrition (FKE), Germany.
    Key, Timothy
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Khader, Yousef Saleh
    Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan.
    Khalili, Davood
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee H.
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Khouw, Ilse M.S.L.
    FrieslandCampina, Singapore.
    Kiechl, Stefan
    Medical University Innsbruck, Austria.
    Killewo, Japhet
    Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Kim, Jeongseon
    National Cancer Center, South Korea.
    Kiyohara, Yutaka
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Klimont, Jeannette
    Statistics Austria, Austria.
    Kolle, Elin
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Kolsteren, Patrick
    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Belgium.
    Korrovits, Paul
    Tartu University Clinics, Estonia.
    Koskinen, Seppo
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Kouda, Katsuyasu
    Kinki University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
    Koziel, Slawomir
    Polish Academy of Sciences, Anthropology Unit, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Kratzer, Wolfgang
    University Hospital Ulm, Germany.
    Krokstad, Steinar
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Kromhout, Daan
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Kruger, Herculina S.
    MRC North-West University, South Africa.
    Kula, Krzysztof
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Kulaga, Zbigniew
    Children's Memorial Health Institute, Poland.
    Kumar, R. Krishna
    Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, India.
    Kusuma, Yadlapalli S.
    All India Institute of Medical Sciences, India.
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Laamiri, Fatima Zahra
    Université Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco.
    Laatikainen, Tiina
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Lachat, Carl
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Laid, Youcef
    National Institute of Public Health of Algeria, Algeria.
    Lam, Tai Hing
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Landrove, Orlando
    Ministerio de Salud Pública, Cuba.
    Lanska, Vera
    Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Czech Republic.
    Lappas, Georg
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden.
    Laugsand, Lars E.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Le Nguyen Bao, Khanh
    National Institute of Nutrition, Viet Nam.
    Le, Tuyen D.
    National Institute of Nutrition, Viet Nam.
    Leclercq, Catherine
    Food and Agriculture Organization, Italy.
    Lee, Jeannette
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Lee, Jeonghee
    National Cancer Center, South Korea.
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Rampal, Lekhraj
    Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia.
    León-Munoz, Luz M.
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Lim, Wei-Yen
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Lima-Costa, M. Fernanda
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rene Rachou Research Institute, Brazil.
    Lin, Xu
    University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Linneberg, Allan
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Lissner, Lauren
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Litwin, Mieczyslaw
    Children's Memorial Health Institute, Poland.
    Liu, Jing
    Capital Medical University, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, China.
    Lorbeer, Roberto
    University Medicine Greifswald, Germany.
    Lotufo, Paulo A.
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Lozano, José Eugenio
    Consejería de Sanidad Junta de Castilla y León, Spain.
    Luksiene, Dalia
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Lundqvist, Annamari
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Lunet, Nuno
    University of Porto Medical School, Portugal.
    Lytsy, Per
    University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ma, Guansheng
    Peking University, Health Science Center, China.
    Machi, Suka
    Jikei University, School of Medicine, Japan.
    Maggi, Stefania
    Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Magliano, Dianna J.
    Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia.
    Makdisse, Marcia
    Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Brazil.
    Malekzadeh, Reza
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Malhotra, Rahul
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Rao, Kodavanti Mallikharjuna
    Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
    Manios, Yannis
    Harokopio University of Athens, Greece.
    Mann, Jim I.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Manzato, Enzo
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Margozzini, Paula
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Markey, Oonagh
    University of Reading, United Kingdom.
    Marques-Vidal, Pedro
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Marrugat, Jaume
    Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques, Spain.
    Martin-Prevel, Yves
    Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France.
    Martorell, Reynaldo
    Emory University, United States.
    Masoodi, Shariq R.
    Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, India.
    Matsha, Tandi E.
    Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa.
    Mazur, Artur
    University of Rzeszow, Poland.
    Mbanya, Jean Claude N.
    University of Yaoundé 1, Cameroon.
    McFarlane, Shelly R.
    University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    McGarvey, Stephen T.
    Brown University, United States.
    McKee, Martin
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.
    McLachlan, Stela
    University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    McLean, Rachael M.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    McNulty, Breige A.
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Md Yusof, Safiah
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.
    Mediene-Benchekor, Sounnia
    University of Oran 1, Algeria.
    Meirhaeghe, Aline
    Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, France.
    Meisinger, Christa
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Mendes, Larissa L.
    Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Menezes, Ana Maria B.
    Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil.
    Mensink, Gert B.M.
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Meshram, Indrapal I.
    Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
    Metspalu, Andres
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Mi, Jie
    Capital Institute of Pediatrics, China.
    Michaelsen, Kim F.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mikkel, Kairit
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Miller, Jody C.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Miquel, Juan Francisco
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Mišigoj-Duraković, Marjeta
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Mohamed, Mostafa K.
    Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.
    Mohammad, Kazem
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Mohammadifard, Noushin
    Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran.
    Mohan, Viswanathan
    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Yusoff, Muhammad Fadhli Mohd
    Ministry of Health, Malaysia.
    Molbo, Drude
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Møller, Niels C.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Molnár, Dénes
    University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Mondo, Charles K.
    Mulago Hospital, Uganda.
    Monterrubio, Eric A.
    Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Mexico.
    Monyeki, Kotsedi Daniel K.
    University of Limpopo, South Africa.
    Moreira, Leila B.
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Morejon, Alain
    University Medical Science, Cuba.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain.
    Morgan, Karen
    RCSI, Dublin, Ireland.
    Mortensen, Erik Lykke
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Moschonis, George
    Harokopio University of Athens, Greece.
    Mossakowska, Malgorzata
    International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Poland.
    Mota, Jorge
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeel
    Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Motta, Jorge
    Gorgas Memorial Institute of Public Health, Panama.
    Mu, Thet Thet
    Ministry of Health, Myanmar.
    Muiesan, Maria Lorenza
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Müller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Murphy, Neil
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Mursu, Jaakko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Murtagh, Elaine M.
    Mary Immaculate College, Ireland.
    Musa, Kamarul Imran
    Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kota Bharu, Malaysia.
    Musil, Vera
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Nakamura, Harunobu
    Kobe University, Japan.
    Námešná, Jana
    Regional Authority of Public Health, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia.
    Nang, Ei Ei K.
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Nangia, Vinay B.
    Suraj Eye Institute, India.
    Nankap, Martin
    Helen Keller International, Cameroon.
    Narake, Sameer
    Healis-Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, India.
    Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva Maria
    CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Spain.
    Nenko, Ilona
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nervi, Flavio
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Neuhauser, Hannelore K.
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Nguyen, Nguyen D.
    University of Pharmacy and Medicine of Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam.
    Nguyen, Quang Ngoc
    Hanoi Medical University, Viet Nam.
    Nieto-Martínez, Ramfis E.
    Universidad Centro-Occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Venezuela.
    Ning, Guang
    Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, School of Medicine, China.
    Ninomiya, Toshiharu
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Nishtar, Sania
    Heartfile, Pakistan.
    Noale, Marianna
    Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Norat, Teresa
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Noto, Davide
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Al Nsour, Mohannad
    Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network, Jordan.
    O'Reilly, Dermot
    Queen's University of Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Ochoa-Avilés, Angélica M.
    Universidad de Cuenca, Ecuador.
    Oh, Kyungwon
    Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, South Korea.
    Olayan, Iman H.
    Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait.
    Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo
    University of Vale do Rio dos Sinos, Brazil.
    Oltarzewski, Maciej
    National Food and Nutrition Institute, Poland.
    Omar, Mohd A.
    Ministry of Health, Malaysia.
    Onat, Altan
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Ordunez, Pedro
    Pan American Health Organization, United States.
    Ortiz, Ana P.
    University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, Puerto Rico.
    Osler, Merete
    Research Center for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Osmond, Clive
    MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, United Kingdom.
    Ostojic, Sergej M.
    University of Novi Sad, Serbia.
    Otero, Johanna A.
    Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander, Colombia.
    Overvad, Kim
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Paccaud, Fred Michel
    Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, Switzerland.
    Padez, Cristina
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Pajak, Andrzej
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Palli, Domenico
    Cancer Prevention and Research Institute, Italy.
    Palloni, Alberto
    University of Madison-Wisconsin, United States.
    Palmieri, Luigi
    Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy.
    Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra
    Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Panza, Francesco
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Parnell, Winsome R.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Parsaeian, Mahboubeh
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Pednekar, Mangesh S.
    Healis-Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, India.
    Peeters, Petra H.
    University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Peixoto, Sergio Viana
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rene Rachou Research Institute, Brazil.
    Pereira, Alexandre C.
    Heart Institute (InCor), Brazil.
    Pérez, Cynthia M.
    University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, Puerto Rico.
    Peters, Annette
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Peykari, Niloofar
    Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Iran.
    Pham, Son Thai
    Vietnam National Heart Institute, Viet Nam.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Germany.
    Pikhart, Hynek
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Pilav, Aida
    Federal Ministry of Health, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    Pilotto, Lorenza
    Cardiovascular Prevention Centre, Udine, Italy.
    Pistelli, Francesco
    University Hospital of Pisa, Italy.
    Pitakaka, Freda
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Piwonska, Aleksandra
    Cardinal Wyszynski Institute of Cardiology, Poland.
    Piwonski, Jerzy
    Cardinal Wyszynski Institute of Cardiology, Poland.
    Plans-Rubió, Pedro
    Public Health Agency of Catalonia, Spain.
    Poh, Bee Koon
    Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Porta, Miquel
    Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques, Spain.
    Portegies, Marileen L.P.
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Poulimeneas, Dimitrios
    Alexander Technological Educational Institute, Greece.
    Pradeepa, Rajendra
    Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Prashant, Mathur
    Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
    Price, Jacqueline F.
    University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Puiu, Maria
    Victor Babeş University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania.
    Punab, Margus
    Tartu University Clinics, Estonia.
    Qasrawi, Radwan F.
    Al-Quds University, Palestine.
    Qorbani, Mostafa
    Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Bao, Tran Quoc
    Ministry of Health, Viet Nam.
    Radic, Ivana
    Institute of Public Health of Vojvodina, Serbia.
    Radisauskas, Ricardas
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Rahman, Mahmudur
    Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research, Bangladesh.
    Raitakari, Olli
    Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Raj, Manu
    Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, India.
    Rao, Sudha Ramachandra
    National Institute of Epidemiology, India.
    Ramachandran, Ambady
    India Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Ramke, Jacqueline
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Ramos, Rafel
    Institut Universitari d'Investigació en Atenció Primària Jordi Gol, Spain.
    Rampal, Sanjay
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Reganit, Paul Ferdinand M.
    University of the Philippines, Philippines.
    Ribeiro, Robespierre
    Department of Health, Brazil.
    Riboli, Elio
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Rigo, Fernando
    Health Center San Agustín, Spain.
    De Wit, Tobias Floris Rinke
    PharmAccess Foundation, Netherlands.
    Ritti-Dias, Raphael M.
    Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Brazil.
    Rivera, Juan A.
    Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Mexico.
    Robinson, Sian M.
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Robitaille, Cynthia
    Public Health Agency of Canada, Canada.
    Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Del Cristo Rodriguez-Perez, María
    Canarian Health Service, Spain.
    Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura A.
    Universidad Industrial de Santander, Colombia.
    Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba
    Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Mexico.
    Rojroongwasinkul, Nipa
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Romaguera, Dora
    CIBEROBN, Spain.
    Ronkainen, Kimmo
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Rosengren, Annika
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rouse, Ian
    Fiji National University, Fiji.
    Rubinstein, Adolfo
    Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy, Argentina.
    Rühli, Frank J.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Rui, Ornelas
    University of Madeira, Portugal.
    Ruiz-Betancourt, Blanca Sandra
    Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico.
    Horimoto, Andrea R.V. Russo
    Heart Institute (InCor), Brazil.
    Rutkowski, Marcin
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Sabanayagam, Charumathi
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Sachdev, Harshpal S.
    Sitaram Bhartia Institute of Science and Research, India.
    Saidi, Olfa
    Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunisia.
    Salanave, Benoit
    French Institute for Health Surveillance, France.
    Martinez, Eduardo Salazar
    National Institute of Public Health, Mexico.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Salonen, Jukka T.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Salvetti, Massimo
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Sánchez-Abanto, Jose
    National Institute of Health, Peru.
    Sandjaja,
    Ministry of Health, Indonesia.
    Sans, Susana
    Catalan Department of Health, Spain.
    Santos, Diana A.
    University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Santos, Osvaldo
    Institute of Preventive Medicine, Portugal.
    Dos Santos, Renata Nunes
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Santos, Rute
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Sardinha, Luis B.
    University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Sarrafzadegan, Nizal
    Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran.
    Saum, Kai-Uwe
    German Cancer Research Center, Germany.
    Savva, Savvas C.
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Cyprus.
    Scazufca, Marcia
    University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Rosario, Angelika Schaffrath
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Schargrodsky, Herman
    Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Schienkiewitz, Anja
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Schmidt, Ida Maria
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Schneider, Ione J.
    Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Schultsz, Constance
    University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Netherlands.
    Schutte, Aletta E.
    MRC North-West University, South Africa.
    Sein, Aye Aye
    Ministry of Health, Thailand.
    Sen, Abhijit
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Senbanjo, Idowu O.
    Lagos State University, College of Medicine, Nigeria.
    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.
    Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Iran.
    Shalnova, Svetlana A.
    National Research Centre for Preventive Medicine, Russian Federation.
    Shaw, Jonathan E.
    Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia.
    Shibuya, Kenji
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Shin, Youchan
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Shiri, Rahman
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
    Siantar, Rosalynn
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Sibai, Abla M.
    American University of Beirut, Lebanon.
    Silva, Antonio M.
    Federal University of Maranhao, Brazil.
    Silva, Diego Augusto Santos
    Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Simon, Mary
    India Diabetes Research Foundation, India.
    Simons, Judith
    St. Vincent's Hospital, Australia.
    Simons, Leon A.
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Sjostrom, Michael
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Slusarczyk, Przemyslaw
    International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Poland.
    Smeeth, Liam
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.
    Smith, Margaret C.
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Snijder, Marieke B.
    Cardiologia di Mercato S. Severino, Italy.
    So, Hung-Kwan
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Sobngwi, Eugène
    University of Yaoundé 1, Cameroon.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Soekatri, Moesijanti Y.E.
    Health Polytechnics Institute, Indonesia.
    Solfrizzi, Vincenzo
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorić, Maroje
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Jérome, Charles Sossa
    Institut Régional de Santé Publique, Benin.
    Soumare, Aicha
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Staessen, Jan A.
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Starc, Gregor
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Stathopoulou, Maria G.
    INSERM, France.
    Staub, Kaspar
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Stavreski, Bill
    Heart Foundation, Australia.
    Steene-Johannessen, Jostein
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Stehle, Peter
    Bonn University, Germany.
    Stein, Aryeh D.
    Emory University, United States.
    Stergiou, George S.
    Sotiria Hospital, Greece.
    Stessman, Jochanan
    Hadassah University Medical Center, Israel.
    Stieber, Jutta
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Stöckl, Doris
    Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Stokwiszewski, Jakub
    National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Poland.
    Stratton, Gareth
    Swansea University, United Kingdom.
    Strufaldi, Maria Wany
    Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Sun, Chien-An
    Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sung, Yn-Tz
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Sunyer, Jordi
    Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Spain.
    Suriyawongpaisal, Paibul
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Swinburn, Boyd A.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Sy, Rody G.
    University of the Philippines, Philippines.
    Szponar, Lucjan
    National Food and Nutrition Institute, Poland.
    Tai, E. Shyong
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Tammesoo, Mari-Liis
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Tamosiunas, Abdonas
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Tang, Line
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Tang, Xun
    Peking University, Health Science Center, China.
    Tanser, Frank
    University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    Tao, Yong
    Peking University, Health Science Center, China.
    Tarawneh, Mohammed
    Ministry of Health, Jordan.
    Tarp, Jakob
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Tarqui-Mamani, Carolina B.
    National Institute of Health, Peru.
    Taylor, Anne
    University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Tchibindat, Félicité
    UNICEF, Cameroon.
    Thijs, Lutgarde
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Thuesen, Betina H.
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Denmark.
    Tolonen, Hanna K.
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Tolstrup, Janne S.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Topbas, Murat
    Karadeniz Technical University, Turkey.
    Topór-Madry, Roman
    Jagiellonian University Medical College, Poland.
    Torrent, Maties
    IB-SALUT Area de Salut de Menorca, Spain.
    Traissac, Pierre
    Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Hellenic Health Foundation, Greece.
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, USA.
    Trinh, Oanh T.H.
    University of Pharmacy and Medicine of Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam.
    Trivedi, Atul
    Government Medical College, India.
    Tshepo, Lechaba
    Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, South Africa.
    Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.
    University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Dasman Diabetes Institute, Kuwait.
    Tynelius, Per
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Tzotzas, Themistoklis
    Hellenic Medical Association for Obesity, Greece.
    Tzourio, Christophe
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Ueda, Peter
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, United States.
    Ukoli, Flora A.M.
    Meharry Medical College, United States.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Unal, Belgin
    Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey.
    Valdivia, Gonzalo
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Vale, Susana
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Valvi, Damaskini
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, United States.
    Van Der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Van Herck, Koen
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Van Minh, Hoang
    Hanoi Medical University, Viet Nam.
    Van Valkengoed, Irene G.M.
    University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Netherlands.
    Vanderschueren, Dirk
    Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium.
    Vanuzzo, Diego
    Centro di Prevenzione Cardiovascolare, Udine, Italy.
    Vatten, Lars
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Vega, Tomas
    Consejería de Sanidad Junta de Castilla y León, Spain.
    Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo
    Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Veronesi, Giovanni
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Monique Verschuren, W. M.
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Netherlands.
    Viegi, Giovanni
    Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Viet, Lucie
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Netherlands.
    Viikari-Juntura, Eira
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
    Vineis, Paolo
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Vioque, Jesus
    Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Spain.
    Virtanen, Jyrki K.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Visvikis-Siest, Sophie
    INSERM, France.
    Viswanathan, Bharathi
    Ministry of Health, Seychelles.
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Voutilainen, Sari
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Vrijheid, Martine
    Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Spain.
    Wade, Alisha N.
    University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.
    Wagner, Aline
    University of Strasbourg, France.
    Walton, Janette
    University College Cork, Ireland.
    Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon Wan
    Institute for Medical Research, Malaysia.
    Wang, Ming-Dong
    Public Health Agency of Canada, Canada.
    Wang, Qian
    Xinjiang Medical University, China.
    Wang, Ya Xing
    Beijing Tongren Hospital, China.
    Wannamethee, S. Goya
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Wareham, Nicholas
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Weerasekera, Deepa
    Ministry of Health, Wellington, New Zealand.
    Whincup, Peter H.
    St. George's, University of London, United Kingdom.
    Widhalm, Kurt
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Widyahening, Indah S.
    Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia.
    Wiecek, Andrzej
    Medical University of Silesia, Poland.
    Wilks, Rainford J.
    University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Willeit, Johann
    Medical University Innsbruck, Austria.
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Poland.
    Wong, Jyh Eiin
    Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Wong, Tien Yin
    Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
    Woo, Jean
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Woodward, Mark
    University of Sydney, Australia; University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Wu, Frederick C.
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Wu, JianFeng
    Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China.
    Wu, Shou Ling
    Kailuan General Hospital, China.
    Xu, Haiquan
    Institute of Food and Nutrition Development of Ministry of Agriculture, China.
    Xu, Liang
    Capital Medical University, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, China.
    Yamborisut, Uruwan
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Yan, Weili
    Fudan University, China.
    Yang, Xiaoguang
    Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China.
    Yardim, Nazan
    Ministry of Health, Turkey.
    Ye, Xingwang
    University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Yiallouros, Panayiotis K.
    Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus.
    Yoshihara, Akihiro
    Niigata University, Japan.
    You, Qi Sheng
    Capital Medical University, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, China.
    Younger-Coleman, Novie O.
    University of the West Indies, Jamaica.
    Yusoff, Ahmad F.
    Ministry of Health, Malaysia.
    Zainuddin, Ahmad A.
    Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.
    Zambon, Sabina
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Zdrojewski, Tomasz
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Zeng, Yi
    Duke University, United States; Peking University, Health Science Center, China.
    Zhao, Dong
    Capital Medical University, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, China.
    Zhao, Wenhua
    Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China.
    Zheng, Yingfeng
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore.
    Zhou, Maigeng
    Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China.
    Zhu, Dan
    Inner Mongolia Medical University, China.
    Zimmermann, Esther
    Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Denmark.
    Cisneros, Julio Zuñiga
    Gorgas Memorial Institute of Public Health, Panama.
    Trends in adult body-mass index in 200 countries from 1975 to 2014: A pooled analysis of 1698 population-based measurement studies with 19.2 million participants2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10026, p. 1377-1396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Underweight and severe and morbid obesity are associated with highly elevated risks of adverse health outcomes. We estimated trends in mean body-mass index (BMI), which characterises its population distribution, and in the prevalences of a complete set of BMI categories for adults in all countries.

    Methods: We analysed, with use of a consistent protocol, population-based studies that had measured height and weight in adults aged 18 years and older. We applied a Bayesian hierarchical model to these data to estimate trends from 1975 to 2014 in mean BMI and in the prevalences of BMI categories (<18.5 kg/m2[underweight], 18.5 kg/m2 to <20 kg/m2, 20 kg/m2 to <25 kg/m2, 25 kg/m2 to <30 kg/m2, 30 kg/m2 to <35 kg/m2, 35 kg/m2 to <40 kg/m2, ≥40 kg/m2 [morbid obesity]), by sex in 200 countries and territories, organised in 21 regions. We calculated the posterior probability of meeting the target of halting by 2025 the rise in obesity at its 2010 levels, if post-2000 trends continue.

    Findings: We used 1698 population-based data sources, with more than 19.2 million adult participants (9.9 million men and 9.3 million women) in 186 of 200 countries for which estimates were made. Global age-standardised mean BMI increased from 21.7 kg/m2 (95% credible interval 21.3-22.1) in 1975 to 24.2 kg/m2 (24.0-24.4) in 2014 in men, and from 22.1 kg/m2 (21.7-22.5) in 1975 to 24.4 kg/m2 (24.2-24.6) in 2014 in women. Regional mean BMIs in 2014 for men ranged from 21.4 kg/m2 in central Africa and south Asia to 29.2 kg/m2 (28.6-29.8) in Polynesia and Micronesia; for women the range was from 21.8 kg/m2 (21.4-22.3) in south Asia to 32.2 kg/m2 (31.5-32.8) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Over these four decades, age-standardised global prevalence of underweight decreased from 13.8% (10.5-17.4) to 8.8% (7.4-10.3) in men and from 14.6% (11.6-17.9) to 9.7% (8.3-11.1) in women. South Asia had the highest prevalence of underweight in 2014, 23.4% (17.8-29.2) in men and 24.0% (18.9-29.3) in women. Age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 3.2% (2.4-4.1) in 1975 to 10.8% (9.7-12.0) in 2014 in men, and from 6.4% (5.1-7.8) to 14.9% (13.6-16.1) in women. 2.3% (2.0-2.7) of the world's men and 5.0% (4.4-5.6) of women were severely obese (ie, have BMI ≥35 kg/m2). Globally, prevalence of morbid obesity was 0.64% (0.46-0.86) in men and 1.6% (1.3-1.9) in women.

    Interpretation: If post-2000 trends continue, the probability of meeting the global obesity target is virtually zero. Rather, if these trends continue, by 2025, global obesity prevalence will reach 18% in men and surpass 21% in women; severe obesity will surpass 6% in men and 9% in women. Nonetheless, underweight remains prevalent in the world's poorest regions, especially in south Asia.

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  • 22.
    Ekblom‐Bak, Elin
    et al.
    Department of Physical Activity and Health, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Center for Health and Performance, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Sweden; Dept MGA, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg Sweden.
    Bergman, Frida
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bergström, Göran
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlin-Almevall, Albin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology.
    Drake, Isabel
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Engström, Gunnar
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan E
    CMIV, Centre of Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Physiology, and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gummesson, Anders
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Clinical Genetics and Genomics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hagström, Emil
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hjelmgren, Ola
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter J
    Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mannila, Maria
    Heart and Vascular Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, André
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Persson, Margaretha
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Reitan, Christian
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rådholm, Karin
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Caroline
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Sköld, Magnus C
    Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine Solna and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Swahn, Eva
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öhlin, Jerry
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Department of Physical Activity and Health The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences Stockholm Sweden.
    Accelerometer derived physical activity patterns in 27.890 middle‐aged adults: The SCAPIS cohort study2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 866-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims to describe accelerometer-assessed physical activity (PA) patterns and fulfillment of PA recommendations in a large sample of middle-aged men and women, and to study differences between subgroups of socio-demographic, socio-economic, and lifestyle-related variables. A total of 27 890 (92.5% of total participants, 52% women, aged 50–64 years) middle-aged men and women with at least four days of valid hip-worn accelerometer data (Actigraph GT3X+, wGT3X+ and wGT3X-BT) from the Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImage Study, SCAPIS, were included. In total, 54.5% of daily wear time was spent sedentary, 39.1% in low, 5.4% in moderate, and only 0.1% in vigorous PA. Male sex, higher education, low financial strain, born in Sweden, and sedentary/light working situation were related to higher sedentary time, but also higher levels of vigorous PA. High BMI and having multiple chronic diseases associated strongly with higher sedentary time and less time in all three PA intensities. All-year physically active commuters had an overall more active PA pattern. The proportion fulfilling current PA recommendations varied substantially (1.4% to 92.2%) depending on data handling procedures and definition used. Twenty-eight percent was defined as having an “at-risk” behavior, which included both high sedentary time and low vigorous PA. In this large population-based sample, a majority of time was spent sedentary and only a fraction in vigorous PA, with clinically important variations between subgroups. This study provides important reference material and emphasizes the importance of a comprehensive assessment of all aspects of the individual PA pattern in future research and clinical practice.

  • 23.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rönnlund, Michael
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundström, Anna
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden; Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Norberg, Margareta
    Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet, 113 30, Stockholm, Sweden; Umeå Center of Functional Brain Imaging, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
    Social Network Size and Cognitive Functioning in Middle-Aged Adults: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations2017In: Journal of Adult Development, ISSN 1068-0667, E-ISSN 1573-3440, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the present study was to examine relations between social network size and three cognitive abilities (episodic memory, semantic memory, visuospatial ability) in middle-aged adults. We analyzed cross-sectional data on social network size and cognitive functioning that were available for 804 participants aged 40–60 years. In addition, we examined 5- and 10-year follow-up measurements of cognitive functioning that were available for 604 and 255 participants, respectively. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a positive association between social network size and each of the three cognitive abilities. Baseline network size was positively related to 5-year changes in semantic memory, and to 10-year changes in semantic as well as episodic memory, but was unrelated to changes in visuospatial performance. A minor portion of the sample (n = 131) had 10-year follow-up data on network size. Cross-lagged panel correlations revealed that baseline network size was associated with follow-up measurement in cognitive functioning (episodic memory, semantic memory), whereas baseline cognitive performance was unrelated to future network size. Together, the results demonstrate a small but positive relation between network size and declarative memory abilities, in line with models proposing a cognitive reserve built up by factors such as the increased cognitive stimulation associated with a more extensive social network.

  • 24.
    Florell, Alexandra
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Segerlund, Emilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Aktiva skoltransporter – elevers upplevelser av att gå och cykla till skolan under vintern2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There are fewer children and adolescents today who reach the recommended amount of physical activity. The number of children walking or cycling to school has drastically fallen in recent decades. Therefore, it is important to investigate how students experience active school transport. The aim of the study was to investigate students experiences of participating in an empowerment-inspired study to promote active school transport during the winter. Through a qualitative method, four focus groups were conducted, where the experience of active school transport during the winter was discussed with photovoice as a method. The result was analyzed by a latent content analysis. The study was part of a three-year research project in northern Sweden about active school transport where several schools participate. In this project, two classes participated from grade 6. The results show that children's experiences of active school transport in winter are not very different from what they are in the summer if the conditions of good tires and plowed roads exist. The children expressed that they felt more alert, had better concentration in school and a sense of community during the project. From the result, three sub themes were formed; “external factors affect children's ways of getting to school”, “participation and sense of community throughout the process are important”, “active school transport has many advantages” that then formed a main theme; “surroundings, togetherness and perceived benefits determine pupils' perception of active school transport”.

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  • 25.
    Forsberg, Hanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Active school transportation: Understanding the parental decision-making process2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Few children and adolescents reach the recommended levels of daily physical activity. This trend is evident in the countries examined in this thesis: Sweden and Spain. In efforts to reverse the current trend, active school transportation (AST) and independent mobility (IM) have been suggested as opportunities to increase levels of physical activity. Unfortunately, AST and IM have decreased during recent decades; consequently, initiatives promoting such behaviors have been called for. Parents are the main decision-makers on a child’s use of AST and IM, and thus, understanding their decisions is important in efforts to promote such behaviors. The overarching aim of this thesis was to increase the understanding of the parental decision-making process concerning their children’s active transport to school.

    This thesis applied an exploratory sequential design, with both interview (qualitative) and cross-sectional (quantitative) designs used to attain the overall aim. Data was collected through interviews with 20 parents (I) and two surveys: the PILCAST (Parents intentions to let their child use AST) questionnaire (II-III) and the PACO (Pedalea y Anda COlegio [Cycle and walk to school]) family questionnaire (IV). In total, 1024 responses from parents were collected with the PILCAST questionnaire (II). In paper III, a sub-sample of 610 was extracted from the 1024, based on parents responding “yes” or “no” to participation in an AST intervention. In paper IV, a total of 573 parents were included in the study. Data was analyzed with content analysis (I), descriptive statistics (II-IV), confirmatory factor analysis (II), linear regression analysis (II-IV), and logistic regression analysis (IV).

    The main findings showed that parents’ decisions regarding AST and IM were influenced by social norms, which was reflected in appearing to be a good parent and by what significant others do in their vicinity and neighborhood (I, II, IV). The importance of social norms applied to both Swedish and Spanish parents when it comes to AST. Some, gender differences were found, showing that they might play a more important role for parents of girls when it comes to AST and IM. Further, the findings showed that attitudes influence decisions, which was reflected in how parents master everyday life by sometimes choosing what is most convenient, even though they are aware of the benefits of AST (I-II). Parents identified factors both impeding and facilitating the use of AST, while safety and trusting the child were found to be important (I-II). The findings also indicate that the intervention within the Sustainable Innovation for Children Transporting Actively (SICTA) project might positively influence parents’ beliefs about AST (III). In addition, there seems to be a habitual factor involved in the parental decision-making process (II). Differences were found between parents’ decisions to let their child cycle to school compared to letting their child walk to school (II). Finally, the parental decision-making process seems to be influenced by the child’s age and the distance between home and school (I, II, IV). The PILCAST questionnaire showed acceptable validity and reliability.

    In conclusion, the findings show that when aiming to promote AST and IM, social acceptance is important. This concerns both other people’s judgments of parenting and what other important referent groups are doing, encompassing the visibility of AST and IM in the parents’ vicinity and neighborhoods. Attention given to gender differences could be beneficial as well. Further, it is also important to understand the prerequisites of modern family life. It is likely that strengthening positive attitudes in parents could promote AST, but the practice also needs to be in line with their everyday life tasks. Efforts should also be made to strengthen the factors that facilitate AST. From a parental perspective, this includes safety and being supported in gaining trust in their children and their children’s capabilities with respect to the age of the children. Habit seems to play an important role, and to encourage parents to form new habits, it might be beneficial to launch AST interventions along with contextual changes, as these might open a window for change, which could occur in the transition between preschool and primary school. It could be beneficial to consider cycling and walking as different behaviors because walking seems to be more dependent on the distance to school than cycling. Further, the PILCAST questionnaire was valid and reliable, providing an increased understanding of these behaviors from a parental perspective. Finally, to make children’s use of active transport to school the more favorable choice, it seems worthwhile not only to give children the opportunity to participate but also to involve parents and address their beliefs when designing interventions.

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  • 26.
    Forsberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Forward, Sonja
    Swedish Road and Transport Research Institute, VTI, 581 95 Linköping, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Development and Initial Validation of the PILCAST Questionnaire: Understanding Parents’ Intentions to Let Their Child Cycle or Walk to School2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 21, article id 11651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children generally do not meet the recommendation of 60 min of daily physical activity (PA); therefore, active school transportation (AST) is an opportunity to increase PA. To promote AST, the involvement of parents seems essential. Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the aim was to develop and validate the PILCAST questionnaire to understand parents’ intentions to let their child cycle or walk to school. Cross-sectional sampling was performed, where 1024 responses were collected from parents. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable fit indices for the factorial structure according to the TPB, comprising 32 items grouped in 11 latent constructs. All constructs showed satisfying reliability. The regression analysis showed that the TPB explained 55.3% of parents’ intentions to let the child cycle to school and 20.6% regarding walking, increasing by a further 18.3% and 16.6%, respectively, when past behavior was added. The most influential factors regarding cycling were facilitating perceived behavioral control, positive attitudes, subjective and descriptive norms, and for walking, subjective and descriptive norms. The PILCAST questionnaire contributes to a better understanding of the psychological antecedents involving parents’ decisions to let their child cycle or walk to school, and may therefore provide guidance when designing, implementing and evaluating interventions aiming to promote AST.

  • 27.
    Forsberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Palma-Leal, Ximena
    iGEO Group, School of Physical Education, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile.
    Ruiz-Alarcón, Ana
    PA-Help “Physical Activity for Health Promotion” Research Group, ‘La Inmaculada’ Teacher Training Centre, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Aznar, Susana
    PAFS Research Group, Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 45071, Toledo, Spain; Biomedical Research Networking Center on Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain.
    Campos-Garzón, Pablo
    Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Sport, and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Chillón, Palma
    Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Sport, and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Huertas- Delgado, Francisco Javier
    PA-Help “Physical Activity for Health Promotion” Research Group, ‘La Inmaculada’ Teacher Training Centre, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    How parents' perception of the social norm is associated with their adolescent's commuting behaviour to school2024In: Journal of Transport & Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1413, Vol. 36, article id 101786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Forsberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Children's intervention participation is associated with more positive beliefs towards active school transportation among parents2023In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 38, no 2, article id daad016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insufficient physical activity among children is a critical issue and health promoting initiatives are required to reverse this trend. In response to the current situation, a school-based intervention aiming to increase physical activity with the aid of active school transportation (AST) was implemented in one municipality in northern Sweden. By adopting the framework of the Theory of Planned Behavior, we aimed to analyse beliefs among parents whose children were or were not involved in the AST intervention. All municipality schools were included. There were 1024 responses from parents, comprising 610 who responded either &apos;yes&apos; or &apos;no&apos; to participating in the intervention. An adjusted linear regression analysis showed that children&apos;s intervention participation was significantly associated with more positive beliefs towards AST among parents. These results indicates that it is possible to influence beliefs that are important in the parental decision-making process by the use of an AST intervention. Therefore, to make children´s active transport to school the more favorable choice for parents, it seems to be worthwhile to not only give children the opportunity to participate but also to involve parents and address their beliefs when designing interventions.Not enough physical activity among children is an important issue and health promoting initiatives are needed to reverse this trend. In response to the current situation, a school-based intervention aiming to increase physical activity using active school transportation (AST) was implemented in one municipality in northern Sweden. Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour framework, we aimed to analyse beliefs among parents whose children were or were not involved in the AST intervention. Children’s participation in the intervention was significantly associated with more positive beliefs towards AST among parents. These results indicate that it is possible to influence beliefs that are important in the parental decision-making process by the use of an AST intervention. Therefore, to make children’s active transport to school the more favourable choice for parents, it seems to be worthwhile to not only give children the opportunity to participate but also to involve parents and address their beliefs when designing interventions.

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  • 29.
    Geijer, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sjöholm, JennieLuleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift Nr. 802021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Giron, Carolina Corrêa
    et al.
    Departamento de Ciências Biomoleculares, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil; Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Hospital de Clínicas, Uberaba, MG, Brazil.
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China; Centre of Advanced Research in Bionanoconjugates and Biopolymers, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi, Romania; Department of Chemical and Geological Sciences, University of Cagliari, Monserrato, Italy.
    Barroso da Silva, Fernando Luís
    Departamento de Ciências Biomoleculares, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Differences between Omicron SARS-CoV-2 RBD and other variants in their ability to interact with cell receptors and monoclonal antibodies2023In: Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics, ISSN 0739-1102, E-ISSN 1538-0254, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 5707-5727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SARS-CoV-2 remains a health threat with the continuous emergence of new variants. This work aims to expand the knowledge about the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) interactions with cell receptors and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). By using constant-pH Monte Carlo simulations, the free energy of interactions between the RBD from different variants and several partners (Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme-2 (ACE2) polymorphisms and various mAbs) were predicted. Computed RBD-ACE2-binding affinities were higher for two ACE2 polymorphisms (rs142984500 and rs4646116) typically found in Europeans which indicates a genetic susceptibility. This is amplified for Omicron (BA.1) and its sublineages BA.2 and BA.3. The antibody landscape was computationally investigated with the largest set of mAbs so far in the literature. From the 32 studied binders, groups of mAbs were identified from weak to strong binding affinities (e.g. S2K146). These mAbs with strong binding capacity and especially their combination are amenable to experimentation and clinical trials because of their high predicted binding affinities and possible neutralization potential for current known virus mutations and a universal coronavirus.

  • 31.
    Grafte, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Laurent, Elise
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    En litteraturstudie om återhämtning och kortisol bland militärer2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recovery and healthy choices have been shown to be an important factor in having a natural resilience to stress. When the body is exposed to a stressor, a stress reaction is created and cortisol is released, which in turn can affect the body in short and long term. Cortisol is produced during both physiological and psychological stress. Soldiers often practice in realistic scenarios to build a resistance to stress and getting the tools to cope with real events. During the exercises, the military is exposed to both physiological and psychological stress for extended periods and after the exercises the body needs to recover to rebuild. Recovery is thus an important factor for the soldier.Aim: The aim was to investigate the scientific evidence that is documented about cortisol levels and recovery time among the military.Method: A literature review with a descriptive design was performed. Four different databases were searched, and nine quantitative articles related to the topic were found.Results: The analysis of the data in the included articles answered three questions regarding the role of recovery in the military context. Three studies were found about the chosen topic, within these studies there was one study that showed that the cortisol levels and recovery time differed between men and women. It showed that 72 hours after field exercise men’s cortisol levels had returned to basal levels while women's cortisol levels remained increased for over two weeks.Conclusion: The literature review showed that cortisol levels both increase and decrease in military professionals as they are exposed to extreme field exercises with too little recovery for cortisol levels to return to basal levels. Depending on how extreme the exercise has been, the military should have a recovery period that lasts from 24 hours to two weeks.

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  • 32.
    Hatab, Assem Abu
    et al.
    Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Krautscheid, Lena
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering LTH, Lund University, Lund, Sweden,.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology. Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Sweden.
    COVID-19 risk perception and public compliance with preventive measures: Evidence from a multi-wave household survey in the MENA region2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 7, article id e0283412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the association between individuals’ concern about contracting COVID-19 and their compliance with recommended preventive and mitigation measures, namely wearing face masks, maintaining social distancing and handwashing, in the context of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The empirical analysis is based on a panel dataset from the Combined COVID-19 MENA Monitor Household Survey, which was carried out in Jordan, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia and Egypt. Applying a probit estimation technique, a positive and statistically significant association was found between the level of COVID-19 worries and individuals’ compliance with the mitigation measures. Notably, the results revealed that this association followed a “first-up-then-down” trend, showing that compliance with the three mitigation measures rose as individuals’ worries about contracting the virus increased, and then markedly decreased after they had been infected. Sociodemographic characteristics contributing to lower levels of compliance included being male, being over 60, having lower levels of education and having a lower household income. A cross-country analysis revealed remarkable differences between the five countries, with the strongest association between COVID-19 concerns and adherence to mitigation measures observed in Tunisia and Sudan, and the weakest association seen in Jordan and Morocco. Policy implications are outlined for effective risk communication and management during disease outbreaks and public health emergencies to encourage appropriate public health behaviours.

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  • 33.
    Hedlund, Amanda
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Bakgrundsljud: påverkan på den mentala arbetsbelastningen2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The physical work environment is important for your health. The type of office we work in have a significant impact on the individual. We know today that noise, especially over a longer period of time contribute to negative health effects. Despite this we continue designing offices with open landscape where workers cannot control the background noise. This study is conducted in a controlled environment with the intention to get a view how it might be to work in an open landscape office and in a regular office. The study measure both perceived and observed mental load, and how these differ in a quiet environment and an environment with background noise. In the experiment we used eye-tracking equipment to measure pupil dilation, which may be associated with increased mental load. GSR-equipment was used to measure emotional arousal and participants perceived workload was measured using a NASA-TLX questionnaire. The result shows that the environment with background noise was experienced as disturbing throughout the test. Differences in pupil dilation showed an increased mental workload when there was sound in the background, but only on the tests that contained a reading task. If the workload becomes too high, it can, according to previous research, lead to a negative impact on a person’s health. 

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  • 34.
    Hedman, Linnea
    et al.
    The OLIN studies, Norrbotten county council; Department of public health and clinical medicine, Occupational and environmental medicine, Umeå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Backman, Helena
    Norrbotten Cty Council, OLIN Studies, Lulea, Sweden; Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Occupat & Environm Med, Lulea, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care. The OLIN studies, Norrbotten county council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Andersson, Martin
    Department of public health and clinical medicine, Occupational and environmental medicine, Umeå University, Sweden., Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation. The OLIN studies, Norrbotten county council; Department of public health and clinical medicine, Division of respiratory medicine, Umeå University., Umeå, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    The OLIN studies, Norrbotten county council; Department of public health and clinical medicine, Occupational and environmental medicine, Umeå University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Late Breaking Abstract - E-cigarette use among Swedish teenagers2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52, no suppl 62, article id OA5220Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Hedman, Linnea
    et al.
    Department of public health and clinical medicine, Division of sustainable health, Umeå University; The OLIN studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Backman, Helena
    Department of public health and clinical medicine, Division of sustainable health, Umeå University; The OLIN studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care. The OLIN studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Department of public health and clinical medicine, Division of medicine, Umeå University; The OLIN studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting research center, Institute of medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Department of public health and clinical medicine, Division of sustainable health, Umeå University; The OLIN studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    E-cigarette use is most common in persistent smokers in a Swedish prospective population study2019In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 54, no 63, article id OA3313Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Ho, Hung Chak
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesiology, School of Clinical Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong; Department of Urban Planning and Design, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Ren, Chao
    Division of Landscape Architecture, Faculty of Architecture, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Wang, Dan
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Ontario Tech University, Oshawa, Canada; Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Oshawa, Canada.
    Systematic identification of heat events associated with emergency admissions to enhance the heat-health action plan in a subtropical city: a data-driven approach2022In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 29, no 59, p. 89273-89282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR), a heat-health action plan should address various impacts of hazards at different levels, including an early warning system to monitor risks and behaviour enhancement to increase disaster preparedness. It is necessary to comply with guidelines regarding heat duration/intensity. In this study, we developed a data-driven approach to rapidly and systematically estimate the impacts of various heat events on emergency admissions among the adult population (n = 7,086,966) in Hong Kong in order to enhance the heat-health action plan. Immediate, short-term, and long-term impacts determined by 1-day, 4-day, and 8-day windows were estimated to identify specific heat events suitable for early warnings. In addition, underestimated risk, determined by a continuous increase in heat risk after days without significant emergency admissions, was estimated to evaluate potential maladaptive behaviours among a specific subpopulation. Based on age- and gender-specific analyses, 1D, 1D1N, and 2D2N were observed to have a stronger immediate impact on emergency admissions. 1D1N and 2D2N also showed notable short-term and long-term impacts. Based on heat vulnerability factors (age and gender), 2D2N was a higher-priority extreme heat event for early warning measures than 1D1N. Furthermore, men aged 19 to 64 had the highest underestimated risk. Specifically, they had IRR values of 1.113 [1.087, 1.140], 1.061 [1.035, 1.087], and 1.069 [1.043, 1.095] during lag days 3-5 of 3D2N, respectively, possibly due to a lack of adaptive behaviour. By adopting our approach, the duration of heat events with significant health impacts can be identified in order to further enhance relevant heat stress information. This framework can be applied to other cities with a similar background for rapid assessment.

  • 37.
    Ho, Hung Chak
    et al.
    Healthy High Density Cities Lab, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Department of Urban Planning and Design, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Department of Anaesthesiology, School of Clinical Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Wang, Dan
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Ontario Tech University, Canada; Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Canada.
    Leung, Jason
    Jockey Club Centre for Osteoporosis Care and Control, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Yu, Blanche
    Jockey Club Centre for Osteoporosis Care and Control, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Woo, Jean
    Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Jockey Club Institute of Ageing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Yui Kwok, Timothy Chi
    Jockey Club Centre for Osteoporosis Care and Control, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Lau, Kevin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    “Planned greenspace” or “natural greenspace” in a high-density city with compact environment? An empirical study of osteoporosis among senior population2022In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 219, article id 109117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoporosis is a major physical health issue in healthy ageing among urban populations. However, few studies have investigated how greenspace can influence osteoporosis, especially to those who lived in a compact city with high-density living environment. Furthermore, no studies have investigated how “planned greenspace” and “natural greenspace” can separately influence osteoporosis among senior population. We hereby conducted an empirical study to evaluate the relationship between osteoporosis, “planned greenspace” and “natural greenspace”, based on the use of land use data derived from local geospatial information and satellite images. Our results showed that seniors who were 1) aged, 2) female, 3) less educated, 4) smokers, and 5) with chronic respiratory diseases were associated with osteoporosis. Considering factors of greenspace, a higher percentage of planned greenspace surrounding the residence may be a protective factor while natural greenspace did not influence the individuals. Specifically, a 10% increase of planned greenspace within the 600-m radius area surrounding the residence was negative associated with osteoporosis (−2.8% [-5.1%, −0.5%]). Based on our results, development of planned greenspace may be necessary, as compact built environment of a high-density city often resulted in a lack of planned greenspace for physical activities. Along with the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for an age-friendly city, our findings suggest that improving the planned greenspace in a walkable distance around one's neighboring environment is a potential strategy for prevention of osteoporosis and related physical health issues as well as for life quality improvement among the senior population.

  • 38.
    Ho, Janice Y.
    et al.
    Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Shi, Yuan
    Institute of Future Cities, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Lau, Kevin K.L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water. Institute of Future Cities, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Ng, Edward Y.Y.
    Institute of Future Cities, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; School of Architecture, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Ren, Chao
    Division of Landscape Architecture, Department of Architecture, Faculty of Architecture, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Goggins, William B.
    Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Urban heat island effect-related mortality under extreme heat and non-extreme heat scenarios: A 2010–2019 case study in Hong Kong2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 858, Part 1, article id 159791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect exacerbates the adverse impact of heat on human health. However, while the UHI effect is further intensified during extreme heat events, prior studies have rarely mapped the UHI effect during extreme heat events to assess its direct temperature impact on mortality. This study examined the UHI effect during extreme heat and non-extreme heat scenarios and compared their temperature-mortality associations in Hong Kong from 2010 to 2019. Four urban heat island degree hour (UHIdh) scenarios were mapped onto Hong Kong&apos;s tertiary planning units and classified into three levels (Low, Moderate, and High). We assessed the association between temperature and non-external mortality of populations living in each UHIdh level for the extreme heat/non-extreme heat scenarios during the 2010–2019 hot seasons. Our results showed substantial differences between the temperature-mortality associations in the three levels under the UHIdh extreme heat scenario (UHIdh_EH). While there was no evidence of increased mortality in Low UHIdh_EH areas, the mortality risk in Moderate and High UHIdh_EH areas were significantly increased during periods of hot temperature, with the High UHIdh_EH areas displaying almost double the risk (RR: 1.08, 95%CI: 1.03, 1.14 vs. RR: 1.05, 95 % CI: 1.01, 1.09). However, other non-extreme heat UHI scenarios did not demonstrate as prominent of a difference. When stratified by age, the heat effects were found in Moderate and High UHIdh_EH among the elderly aged 75 and above. Our study found a difference in the temperature-mortality associations based on UHI intensity and potential heat vulnerability of populations during extreme heat events. Preventive measures should be taken to mitigate heat especially in urban areas with high UHI intensity during extreme heat events, with particular attention and support for those prone to heat vulnerability, such as the elderly and poorer populations.

  • 39.
    Hua, Junyi
    et al.
    School of International Affairs and Public Administration, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China.
    Shi, Yuan
    Institute of Future Cities, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China.
    Ren, Chao
    Faculty of Architecture, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.
    Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun
    Institute of Future Cities, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China.
    Ng, Edward Yan Yung
    School of Architecture, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China.
    Impact of Urban Overheating and Heat-Related Mortality in Hong Kong2022In: Urban Overheating: Heat Mitigation and the Impact on Health / [ed] Aghamohammadi. N; Santamouris, M, Springer Nature, 2022, p. 275-292Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Huang, Hongshi
    et al.
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Si
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yi
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Wang, Yongjian
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Yanfang
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Ao, Yingfang
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Reliability and Validity of a Chinese Version of the Lysholm Score and Tegner Activity Scale for Knee Arthroplasty2022In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 54, article id jrm00317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To verify the reliability and validity of Chinese versions of the Lysholm score and the Tegner activity scale for knee arthroplasty.

    Methods: Sixty-four patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and 28 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Participants were divided into 4 groups: a pre-operation group; a 3 months post-operation group; a 1-year post-operation group; and a control group of healthy volunteers. Participants completed the Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale twice over a period of 3–7 days.

    Results: The intraclass correlation coefficients of the Lysholm score and Tegner scale were both relatively high, at 0.99 and 0.97, respectively. Moreover, the Cronbach’s alpha of the Lysholm score was 0.71. The items “locking” and “instability” differed slightly between groups (Kruskal–Wallis: for locking, χ2 (p) = 13.48, p = 0.0037; for instability, χ2 (p) = 4.32, p = 0.2292).

    Conclusion: The simplified-Chinese versions of the Lysholm score and the Tegner scale are applicable for use with patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, and have relatively high validity and reliability. The items “locking” and “instability” should be combined with clinical data to make the Lysholm score more suitable for assessment of total knee arthroplasty.

  • 41.
    Häger, Janina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology.
    Jonsson, Elin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology.
    Strandberg, Rebecca
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology.
    Vägar till välmående - studenters upplevelser och erfarenheter av att börja studera hemifrån på grund av covid-19: En kvalitativ studie2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today there is limited research on students well-being during a pandemic. Covid-19 has affected schools in which the Public Health Agency has given recommendations for universities to transfer to distance learning. The aim of this study was to examine how university-students maintain their health after they have started to study from home due to covid-19. The study was conducted using a qualitative method where six Swedish university-students was interviewed using an interview guide. Analysis of the data meant that the results produced a main category “Roads to well-being during distance learning” and three subcategories: (1) Social support through digital means, (2) Activities for mind and body, and (3) Routines makes for everyday structure. Results showed that participants used different paths to promote their well-being by keeping contact through digital means, physical activity which also benefits mental health and routines makes for a structured everyday life. Conclusion indicates that the participants experiences and manageability have served them to maintain well-being during covid-19. This will provide added knowledge to health counselors and other professions who work towards promoting and maintain individual health.

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  • 42.
    Itthipanichpong, Thun
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Moonwong, Songthai
    Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Thamrongskulsiri, Napatpong
    Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Prasathaporn, Niti
    Department of Orthopaedics, Ramkhamhaeng Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak
    Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umea, Sweden..
    Tanpowpong, Thanathep
    Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Validity and Reliability of the Thai Versions of the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and Tegner Activity Scale2023In: The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2325-9671, Vol. 11, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Functional or quality of life questionnaires are important tools in clinical investigations. The Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and Tegner Activity Scale are knee-specific questionnaires that are widely used to assess knee function.

    Purpose: To translate both questionnaires into Thai and to assess the validity and reliability of the Thai versions of the Lysholm and adjusted Tegner scales.

    Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3.

    Methods: The Lysholm and Tegner scales were translated into Thai by using the forward-backward translation protocol. Because cultural modifications were made to the sports used to measure activity on the Tegner scale, the authors of this study refer to the Thai version as the “Thai adjusted Tegner scale.” The reliability and validity of the translated scales were evaluated by obtaining the responses of 60 consecutive patients (mean age, 40.5 years; 34 male, 26 female); the patients also completed the Thai version of the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC-SKF). Criterion validity was tested by correlating the scores from both translated questionnaires with those from the Thai IKDC-SKF, while reliability was assessed by measuring test-retest reliability and internal consistency.

    Results: The Thai Lysholm scale showed a strong correlation with the Thai IKDC-SKF (r = 0.89), while the Thai adjusted Tegner scale showed a moderate correlation with the Thai IKDC-SKF (r = 0.60). The intrarater and test-retest reliability measures were excellent for the Thai Lysholm (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.94 and 0.98, respectively) and moderate to good for the Thai adjusted Tegner (ICC, 0.73 and 0.86, respectively). The internal consistency for the Thai Lysholm was acceptable at all the time points (Cronbach alpha, 0.71-0.73).

    Conclusion: The Thai Lysholm and Thai adjusted Tegner scales adequately retained the characteristics of the original versions. They can be considered reliable instruments for Thai patients with knee-related problems.

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  • 43.
    Jackson, Sarah
    et al.
    University of Saskatchewan, Political Science, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Poelzer, Gregory A
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Poelzer, Greg
    University of Saskatchewan, Political Science, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Noble, Bram
    University of Saskatchewan, Geography, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Mining and Sustainability in the Circumpolar North: The Role of Government in Advancing Corporate Social Responsibility2023In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 37-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is recognized as important to fostering sustainable natural resource development in the Circumpolar North. Governments are playing an increasingly active role in promoting and shaping CSR initiatives, often in collaboration with Indigenous communities and industry. This paper explores the role of CSR in mining for improving socio-economic and environmental management practice. The article argues that government instituted regulations can lead to the development and implementation of CSR practices by mining companies. To examine the relationship between government requirements and CSR, we use two Northern case studies: Cameco Corporation’s uranium mining operations located in Saskatchewan, Canada and Northern Iron’s iron mining operation located in Troms and Finnmark county, Norway. Through an in-depth review of scholarly literature, document analysis, and semi-structured interviews, our findings suggest that the role of the state in the initiation and implementation of CSR is of much greater importance than is currently acknowledged in the literature. In the case of Cameco, the Mine Surface Lease Agreements agreed to by the corporation and the provincial government provided motivation for the development and implementation of their world-renowned CSR practices, resulting in a community-based environmental monitoring program and benefits for both the company and surrounding communities. With Northern Iron’s operations in Kirkenes, working hour requirements instituted by the Norwegian Government allowed for significantly higher levels of local employment. Our findings suggest a greater role exists for government to facilitate the adoption of CSR policies, contributing in turn to improved socio-economic and environmental outcomes for Northern communities.

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  • 44.
    Jakobsson, Mats
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Nursing and Medical Technology.
    Elevhälsoenkäter synliggör hälsobagage: En studie av elevers hälsa och trivsel i skolan i Norrbotten2021Report (Other academic)
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  • 45.
    Jasim, Ihsan Abbas
    et al.
    Department of Architecture Engineering, Wasit University, Al Kut, Iraq.
    Fileeh, Moheb Kamil
    Center of Urban and Regional Planning for Postgraduate Studies, Department of Urban Planning, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq.
    Ebrahhem, Mustafa A.
    Center of Urban and Regional Planning for Postgraduate Studies, Department of Urban Planning, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq.
    Al-Maliki, Laheab A.
    Department of Regional Planning, Faculty of Physical Planning, University of Kufa, Najaf, Iraq.
    Al-Mamoori, Sohaib K.
    Department of Environmental Planning, Faculty of Physical Planning, University of Kufa, Najaf, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Geographically weighted regression model for physical, social, and economic factors affecting the COVID-19 pandemic spreading2022In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 29, no 34, p. 51507-51520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to analyze the spatial distribution of the epidemic spread and the role of the physical, social, and economic characteristics in this spreading. A geographically weighted regression (GWR) model was built within a GIS environment using infection data monitored by the Iraqi Ministry of Health records for 10 months from March to December 2020. The factors adopted in this model are the size of urban interaction areas and human gatherings, movement level and accessibil-ity, and the volume of public services and facilities that attract people. The results show that it would be possible to deal with each administrative unit in proportion to its circumstances in light of the factors that appear in it. So, there will not be a single treatment for all areas with different urban characteristics, which sometimes helps not to stop social and economic life due to the imposition of a comprehensive ban on movement and activities. Therefore, there will be other supportive policies other than the ban, depending on the urban indicators for each region, such as reducing external movement from it or relying on preventing public activities only.

  • 46.
    Jingili, Nuru
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Oyelere, Solomon Sunday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Malmström Berghem, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Brännström, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Laine, Teemu H.
    Department of Digital Media, Ajou University, Suwon, 16499, South Korea.
    Balogun, Oluwafemi Samson
    School of Computing, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Adolescents’ perceptions of active school transport in northern Sweden2023In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 9, no 10, article id e20779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Active school transport (AST) refers to using active means of transport such as walking, cycling, or riding a non-motorised scooter to school. It can help improve adolescents’ physical activity levels and create a more sustainable environment. The study involved 70 adolescents (45 boys and 25 girls) aged 13 to 14 from one school in Skellefteå, in Northern Sweden. In an online questionnaire, they were asked about their perceptions of cycling, walking, and riding a non-motorised scooter to school. This study used descriptive statistics, multiple regression analysis, and hypothesis testing with ANOVA to analyse the collected data and compare the perceptions of different types of transport on safety, environmental, and personal factors among adolescents in Northern Sweden. According to the results, more adolescents walked to school than cycled, and significantly few rode a non-motorised scooter to school. Most adolescents believe walking or cycling to school is a great way to exercise. Furthermore, the study also revealed that many adolescents avoid using AST due to the time it takes. Although the study showed that adolescents felt sufficient support for using AST from schools and parents, the number of adolescents using motorised transport is higher during winter than in summer. Additionally, most of them were more confident about cycling and walking to school than riding a non-motorised scooter and thought using AST was nice. Finally, most adolescents perceived having complete control over their transport options when going to school. The research indicates that it is crucial to implement interventions that inspire children to be interested and excited about using AST. These strategies should include fostering an AST culture that is fun and positive, as well as creating environments that are safe and supportive. The research results will guide the creation of a persuasive game that can motivate adolescents to use AST and measure its effectiveness.

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  • 47.
    Kekäläinen, Tiia
    et al.
    Gerontology Research Center and Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Terracciano, Antonio
    Department of Geriatrics, College of Medicine, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.
    Tirkkonen, Anna
    Gerontology Research Center and Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Savikangas, Tiina
    Gerontology Research Center and Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Hänninen, Tuomo
    NeuroCenter, Neurology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
    Stigsdotter Neely, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation. Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sipilä, Sarianna
    Gerontology Research Center and Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Kokko, Katja
    Gerontology Research Center and Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Does personality moderate the efficacy of physical and cognitive training interventions? A 12-month randomized controlled trial in older adults2023In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 202, article id 111957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether personality traits moderate the effects of a 12-month physical or combined physical and cognitive training interventions on physical and cognitive functioning. Participants were community-dwelling 70–85-year-old adults (n = 314). They were randomly assigned to physical training (weekly supervised walking/balance and strength/balance training, home exercises 2–3×/wk and moderate aerobic activity) or to a physical and cognitive training group (the same physical training and computer training on executive functions 3–4×/wk). The outcomes assessed at baseline and post-intervention were physical (maximum gait speed, six-minute walking distance, dual-task cost on gait speed) and cognitive functioning (Stroop, Trail-Making Test-B, verbal fluency, CERAD total score). Personality traits (NEO-PI-3, n = 239) were assessed post-intervention. Personality traits did not moderate intervention effects on physical functioning. Higher openness was associated with greater improvement in CERAD scores, especially in the physical and cognitive training group (group×time×trait B = -0.08, p = .038). Lower neuroticism (time×trait B = -0.04, p = .021) and higher conscientiousness (time×trait B = 0.04, p = .027) were associated with greater improvement in CERAD scores in both groups. Personality traits had mostly null moderating effects across physical and cognitive outcomes, with the possible exception of CERAD score. Individuals with more adaptive personality traits gained more on global cognitive scores during a 12-month training intervention.

  • 48.
    Kero, Alice
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Nyberg, Pauline
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Effekten av hälsopromotiva metoder för kvinnor med fibromyalgi2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Fibromyalgia is characterized with general chronic muscle pain and is classified as a complex, chronic disease. Five percent of the world's population is estimated to have fibromyalgia, and in Sweden 80 percent of those affected are women. Knowledge of health-promoting methods for women with fibromyalgia has recently increased, but compilations of the research area are few. Objective: How can health promotion practices promote the health of women with fibromyalgia? Method: A literature study was conducted where the focus was on compiling health promotion methods, which are nonpharmacological, to improve the health of women with fibromyalgia. Searches in the databases CINAHL and Pubmed resulted in nine included studies. Results: The result showed the following categories: Better mental health, Better physical and functional health and Better health behaviors.Better mental health meant improved psychological well-being, reduced anxiety, reduced depression, better social functioning and better job focus. Better physical and functional health resulted in better acceptance of the pain, less use of healthcare, less disease symptoms and less stiffness. Better health behaviors showed achieved goals and changed lifestyle habits. Conclusion: Through various interventions, non-pharmacological health promotion methods can have a positive impact on women's health. More research is needed in the area to give affected and their relatives more knowledge about fibromyalgia.

  • 49.
    Kim, Jihoon
    et al.
    University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.
    Lindqvist, Anna Karrin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Castelli, Darla M.
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA.
    Feasibility of utilizing gamified learning as a motivational strategy for promoting physical activity participation and healthy eating among college students2024In: Journal of American College Health, ISSN 0744-8481, E-ISSN 1940-3208Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Kowalska, Karolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Borg, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    God hjärnhälsa börjar i magen!: Litteraturöversikt av kostens effekt och olika livsmedels påverkan på hjärnhälsa hos friska vuxna individer i åldern 50 år och uppåt2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies show that a healthy diet can be linked to cognitive function, such as memory and other mental functions of the brain. Humans need a regular intake of nutrients, and with a balanced intake of carbohydrates, fat and proteins, can the brain and body achieve optimal function. Objective: The aim is to research the effect of nutrition and different food on brain health on healthy adults aged 50 and over. Method: The literature review was based on eight scientific articles found in the databases Medline and PubMed. The analysis was performed according to a systematic review using the PICO framework. Results: The compilation of previous research highlights the knowledge of the connection between diet and brain health and emphasizes special success factors within the subject. All articles achieved statistical significance and the purpose could be answered. Conclusion: Continued research should be studied with broader perspectives to satisfy all criteria for promoting brain health. The current study has identified important factors for developing good brain health through nutrition. Studying the impact of diet on brain health may be the key to improving health globally. 

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