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  • 1.
    Brooks, William
    et al.
    Department of Music, University of York (UK); University of Illinois (US); Orpheus Institute in Gent (Belgium).
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Wells, Jeremy J. (Jez)
    Department of Music, University of York (UK).
    Historically Authentic Truths (the HAT trick): Facts, fancies and footnotes2021In: Music and Heritage: New Perspectives on Place-making and Sonic Identity / [ed] Liam Maloney; John Schofield, Taylor & Francis, 2021, 1, p. 183-193Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Footnotes, a composition written between 1983 and 1985 by a composer allegedly named William Brooks, was recorded between 2011 and 2018 by guitarist Stefan Östersjö and sound engineer Jez Wells, with the help of William Brooks, musicologist. It became evident to the three collaborators that the overall project required the construction of a set of different identities for each participant: guitar, guitarist; score, composer; hardware, engineer. This chapter traces the construction of, distinction between and eventual representation of those identities. It considers the extent to which a single entity – personality, place, artifact or historical event – can be regarded as a collection of irreconcilable differences, whether those differences can be constituted as a series of masks or persona and whether anything can truly be said to reside behind those masks.

  • 2.
    Friberg, Ulf
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Lost in interpretation: Re-mixing the master-apprentice relation in the music conservatoire2021In: Seismograf, ISSN 2245-4705, Vol. 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This polyphonic audio paper addresses the relation between master and apprentice in the music conservatoire, and gives voice to the central human and non-human agents in this context. We aim to explore the power structures that constitute a structural framework for these relations, with regard to the agency with which students shape their individual interpretations, and therefore also to the role of imitation in instrumental music teaching. Master classes have arguably been seen as the pinnacle of the master–apprentice tradition, and have had a central role within higher education in Western classical music. It has regularly been claimed that such classes are effective for student development (see Hanken, 2008; 2011; Hanken and Long, 2012; Hanken, 2015; 2016; 2017) although, until recently, research on master classes has been quite sparse (see Hanken, 2008; 2011).

    Results from a qualitative study of teaching and learning of musical interpretation in a master class setting—first articulated in the form of an ethnodrama (Holmgren, 2018; 2020; Nguyễn and Östersjö, 2020; Saldaña, 1998; 2003; 2005; 2011; Salvatore, 2018), written by Holmgren—constitutes the point of departure for the audio paper. Our staging of Holmgren’s ethnodrama as a Hörspiel constitutes an artistic research process, through dramatical and musical composition (Olofsson, 2018). The research process originated in sound, as well as in questions related to musical performance; ultimately, through the many layers of analysis and artistic production, the final outcomes are again manifest in sound. Originating in music education research, the study seeks a better understanding of how the dynamics between teacher, student and music institution can be better utilised in curriculum development. Hence, the audio paper, and the Hörspiel that it contains, constitutes a central result of the study (see further Holmgren, 2020) in artistic form as a sonic and multivocal artefact. We ultimately propose that the future for instrumental teaching in the conservatoire lies in the creation of situations that allow for sharing experiences of performative knowledge. Hereby, teacher and student can work together towards the goal of fostering an individual musician’s voice (Gorton and Östersjö, 2019), highlighting the importance of personal autonomy, situatedness, and an analytical awareness of institutional and societal power structures. Hence, the study points to perspectives that may contribute to curriculum development in higher music education, specifically with regard to instrumental music teaching.

  • 3.
    Gorton, David
    et al.
    Royal Academy of Music, London.
    Kanno, Mieko
    Sibeliusakademin, Helsingfors.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Cerro Rico: the co-production of a discursive voice in chamber music2020In: Music + Practice, E-ISSN 1893-9562, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Centred around a video essay, this exposition aims to develop an understanding of subjectivity within a collaborative chamber music context. Drawing on the theory of situated cognition (see for example Brown, Collins, & Duguid, 1989) and the concept of subjective ‘voice’ in performance (Cumming, 2000), the presentation develops the model proposed by Gorton and Östersjö (2016 and 2019) in which a ‘discursive voice’ may emerge from the process of composer–performer collaboration.

    These ideas are explored through a study of the early rehearsals of David Gorton's composition ‘Cerro Rico’, for soprano violin and charango. This is a very slow piece, and while the two instrumentalists both operate at this extreme of the tempo spectrum, they do so guided by different conceptions, one metronomic and the other taxonomic, of how this should be notated; the charango player works with a very slow metronome mark of quaver = 15 while the violinist plays mostly in large note-values: breves, longs, and dotted longs. From these opposed positions, the performers find a shared understanding of time.

    Through an appraisal of video footage taken from the first rehearsals of ‘Cerro Rico’, it is argued that the malleable character of coordination, shaping, and timing that is afforded in performance by the extreme slowness of the piece creates the conditions for the emergence of a discursive voice, compounded from the contributions of the two performers and the composer. The ‘collaboration’ between composer and performers can be conceived as being situated within this discursive voice, manifested as a sense of shared ownership of the materials.

  • 4.
    Gorton, David
    et al.
    Orpheus Institute, Ghent. Royal Academy of Music, London, UK.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Orpheus Institute, Ghent. Musikhögskolan i Malmö.
    Choose Your Own Adventure Music: On the Emergence of Voice in Musical Collaboration2016In: Contemporary Music Review, ISSN 0749-4467, E-ISSN 1477-2256, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 579-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practices of collaborating composers and performers have been receiving increasing attention within academic discourse. Such collaborations are often presented from two complementary perspectives: pre-compositional joint invention and post-compositional negotiations in the realisation of a score and its notation. This article attempts to bridge the gap between the two perspectives through a discussion on the emergence of ‘voice’ that pervades the artistic practice, and binds the pre- and post-compositional phases together. Two compositions by David Gorton, written in collaboration with guitar player Stefan Östersjö, will be examined:Forlorn Hopefor 11-string alto guitar and optional live electronics andAusterity Measures Ifor 10-string guitar. Both pieces are the result of an extended pre-composition experimental phase, and both pieces attempt to recreate something of those experiments in the contexts of their performance, establishing the conditions for the emergence of a ‘discursive voice’ of both composer and performer

  • 5.
    Gorton, David
    et al.
    Royal Academy of Music, London.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Negotiating the Discursive Voice in Chamber Music2020In: Performance, Subjectivity and Experimentation / [ed] Catherina Laws, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2020, p. 53-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses chamber music performance from the concept of discursive voice, previously proposed by the two authors. It takes two recently premiered compositions by David Gorton, for charango and soprano violin, and for two guitars, premioered by Östersjö, with Mieko Kanno and Jessica Kaiser in 2019, as point of departure. Different methods are used in the study of the two collaborations, combining qualitative and quantitative methods. The results suggest that the model of discursive voice is efficient in describing the nature of the interactions between the two performers and the score. 

  • 6.
    Harlow, Randall
    et al.
    University of Northern Iowa School of Music, USA.
    Petersson, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Ek, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Visi, Federico
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Global Hyperorgan: a platform for telematic musicking and research2021In: NIME 2021, The International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global Hyperorgan is an intercontinental, creative space for acoustic musicking. Existing pipe organs around the world are networked for real-time, geographicallydistant performance, with performers utilizing instruments and other input devices to collaborate musically through the voices of the pipes in each location. A pilot study was carried out in January 2021, connecting two large pipe organs in Piteå, Sweden, and Amsterdam, the Netherlands. A quartet of performers tested the Global Hyperorgan’s capacities for telematic musicking through a series of pieces. The concept of modularity is useful when considering the artistic challenges and possibilities of the Global Hyperorgan. We observe how the modular system utilized in the pilot study afforded multiple experiences of shared instrumentality from which new, synthetic voices emerge. As a long-term technological, artistic and social research project, the Global Hyperorgan offers a platform for exploring technology, agency, voice, and intersubjectivity in hyper-acoustic telematic musicking.

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  • 7.
    Hogg, Bennett
    et al.
    University of Newcastle.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Patterns of Ecological and Aesthetic Co-evolution: Tree-guitars, River-violins and the Ecology of Listening2015In: Contemporary Music Review, ISSN 0749-4467, E-ISSN 1477-2256, Vol. 34, no 44, p. 335-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The move ‘outside’ of the concert hall has repercussions for listening and creative practice beyond simply resituating ‘music’. The building of an environmentally specific instrumentarium draws onin situexploration and cultivation of affordances, but also on the embodied pre-existent knowledge of the artists concerned. A sense of space/place and strategies of listening work together both to situate emergent creative practices within a landscape and to take the affordances of that landscape, the instruments constructed there, and embodied musical experience forward into completed artistic and musical works.

  • 8.
    Hultqvist, Anders
    et al.
    Academy of Music and Drama, University of Gothenburg.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Invisible Sounds in a Nested Ecological Space2019In: Seismograf, ISSN 2245-4705, Vol. 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This audio paper is an exploration of the conceptual ideas for, and the sonic results of, a site-specific day-long installation/performance in the Gothenburg harbour presented at the Gothenburg Art Sound Festival in October 2016. The piece is titled Invisible Sounds, A ‘stethoscope’ towards sounds unheard, and its aim was to create a performative situation where the participating artists, as well as audience and by-passers, could explore the complexity of urban noise. An aim with the project was to highlight and make ‘visible’, or heard, concealed soundings in order to reveal “invisible mobility below the surface of a visual world” (Voegelin, 2014, p.3). By creating a series of interactions between human and environment, as with the immediate interaction between performer, aeolian guitar and the wind on site, and further enhanced through the use of sensors and hydrophones to create sensation beyond normal human perception, the installation presents a widening of the performed space, such as defined by Denis Smalley (Smalley, 2007). With an Arena space set in an urban soundscape the installation introduces what we would like to think of as a Nested Ecological Space. Or, more specifically in this setting: A Nested Ecological Sound and Performance Space.

    The original (live) installation tries to raise the awareness of this (nested) totality by means of an aesthetic/affective experience (which of course is not possible to represent through a stereo recording); not just space, not just environmental sounds, not just performance, but all this together.

    In connection to this the paper also addresses the difference between the two concepts coupling and relation as discussed by Alexander Refsum Jensenius (Jensenius, 2007) and sets these in relation to what Elisabeth Grosz (Grosz, 2008, p.72) writes about sensation versus perception.

    The audio paper discusses the installation by revisiting its artistic materials but also through a multi-layered display of auto-ethnography, documentary materials and analysis.

  • 9.
    Liwicki, Foteini
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Upadhyay, Richa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Chhipa, Prakash Chandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Murphy, Killian
    SAMOVAR laboratory, Telecom SudParis, Institut Polytechnique de Paris, France.
    Visi, Federico
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Liwicki, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Deep Neural Network approaches for Analysing Videos of Music PerformancesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Minors, Helen Julia
    et al.
    York St John University, York, Great Britain.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Conclusion: Probing, Positioning, (Re)Acting2024In: Teaching Music Performance in Higher Education: Exploring the Potential of Artistic Research / [ed] Helen Julia Minors, Stefan Östersjö, Gilvano Dalagna, Jorge Salgado Correia, Open Book Publishers, 2024, p. 307-314Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 11.
    Minors, Helen Julia
    et al.
    York St John University, York, Great Britain.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Dalagna, Gilvano
    University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal; Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Correia, Jorge Salgado
    Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
    Introduction2024In: Teaching Music Performance in Higher Education: Exploring the Potential of Artistic Research / [ed] Helen Julia Minors, Stefan Östersjö, Gilvano Dalagna, Jorge Salgado Correia, Open Book Publishers, 2024, p. 1-8Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 12.
    Minors, Helen Julia
    et al.
    York St John University, York, Great Britain.
    Östersjö, StefanLuleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.Dalagna, GilvanoUniversity of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal; Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Porto, Portugal.Correia, Jorge SalgadoUniversidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
    Teaching Music Performance in Higher Education: Exploring the Potential of Artistic Research2024Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher Music Performance Education, as taught and learned in universities and conservatoires in Europe, is undergoing transformation. Since the nineteenth century, the master-apprentice pedagogical model has dominated, creating a learning environment that emphasises the development of technical skills rather than critical and creative faculties. This book contributes to the renewal of this field by being the first to address the potential of artistic research in developing student-centred approaches and greater student autonomy. This potential is demonstrated in chapters illustrating artistic research projects that are embedded within higher music education courses across Europe, with examples ranging from instrumental tuition and ensemble work to the development of professional employability skills and inclusive practices.

    Bringing together diverse and experienced voices working within Higher Music Education but often also as professional performers, this edited collection pairs critical reflection with artistic insight to present new approaches to curricula for teaching interpretation and performance. It calls for greater collaboration between Higher Education and professional music institutions to create closer bonds with music industries and, thereby, improve students’ career opportunities. Teaching Music Performance in Higher Education will appeal to scholars, performers, teachers, but also students whose interests centre on innovative practices in conservatoires and music departments.

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  • 13.
    Nelson, Robin
    et al.
    University of London, RCSSD, London, UK.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Nordic Contexts2022In: Practice as Research in the Arts (and Beyond): Principles, Processes, Contexts, Achievements, Springer International Publishing , 2022, 2, p. 147-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on the concepts that have driven the development of Artistic Research in the Nordic countries. Acknowledging, like other regional perspectives, that there are many differences between countries and programmes within them, the chapter aims to bring out key issues informing Artistic Research. In particular, it sheds light on the disposition to include the quality of the arts practice as one criterion in research assessment to meet a “dual requirement.” The chapter also reflects on the various relations of artists with the arts and science worlds and with an institutionalized academy. It concludes that the next challenge in the Nordic countries is a consideration of how art, and artistic research outcomes, might have social and political impact.

  • 14.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    et al.
    Malmö Academy of Music, Lund University. Vietnam National Academy of Music.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Inside the Choreography of Gender2020In: Performance, Subjectivity and Experimentation / [ed] Catherine Laws, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2020, p. 169-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is a set of reflections on the process of making Inside/Outside, an installation built on a concept by Nguyễn Thanh Thủy (VN) and developed in collaboration between The Six Tones (VN/SWE), the choreographer Marie Fahlin (SWE) and sound artist Matt Wright (UK). We discuss the choreography of gender (Foster 1998) in the performance of traditional Vietnamese music and the role of the body in the play with gendered identity which is launched in performance of the piece. 

    Qualitative analysis was part of the working method and was carried out by all the participating artists. The study of Inside/Outside focusses on 3rd and 1st person perspectives, where the latter has been approached in two ways: in interview sessions with the three performers and in coding sessions where the coding and the annotations have all referred to the  subjective meaning of the gesture. In 2015, the installation was enhanced by new headphone tracks in which the three performers express their individual experiences of performing the choreography in the piece and reflections on the ways in which they have been socialised into being musicians in their respective cultures. Here, the division between fictive and authentic identities is challenged through the activation of the voice of a narrator (Trinh, 2010). The chapter suggests, by reference to Gadamer’s concept of play, that the process of creating Inside/Outside constituted a situation in which the subjectivity of the individual artist is in a sense bracketed by the rules of the emerging artwork (Gadamer, 2008). Hence, when the artists engage with the body images at play in the choreography of gender in a specific culture, moving in-between different layers of collective and individual identity becomes possible through the rules of the game at play. 

  • 15.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    et al.
    Malmö Academy of Music.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Performative ethnographies of migration and intercultural collaboration in Arrival Cities: Hanoi2020In: Journal of Embodied Research, E-ISSN 2513-8421, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This video article explores the embodied experience of migration by revisiting the process of making Arrival Cities: Hanoi. This piece of experimental music theatre sought a new format for politically informed theatre that would be responsive to the challenges of a globalized society. It is built on ethnographic fieldwork carried out by the Vietnamese/Swedish group The Six Tones, in collaboration with director Jörgen Dahlqvist and the composer Kent Olofsson.

    The role of this ethnographic process was manifold. It was a means of a political engagement, which also created images that could be shared and transformed in the performance. In Arrival Cities: Hanoi, the stage was set so that the three performers could play their instruments, perform choreography, and tell stories. A central aim was to make the individual memories of the performers a cornerstone of the dramaturgy. We are interested in how memory is embodied and how performative ethnography can constitute a method for an ethically and artistically grounded practice, within which we also emphasize the role of empathy and the sharing of individual life stories.

    In this video article, we give particular attention to the choreographies that were recorded and created as part of this process. Intercultural music and theatre operate in a liminal space between traditions, where aesthetic choices are difficult to negotiate. Without trust and empathy, these negotiations cannot reach beyond the surface. In Arrival Cities: Hanoi, composer, director, and performers were all engaged in such learning processes, and the music as performed can be seen as the embodiment of a particular narrative, grounded in an intercultural collaboration.

  • 16.
    Simistira Liwicki, Foteini
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Liwicki, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Perise, Pedro Malo
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Visi, Federico
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Analysing Musical Performance in Videos Using Deep Neural Networks2020In: Proceedings of the 1st Joint Conference on AI Music Creativity, AIMC, Stockholm, Sweden, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a method to facilitate labelling of music performance videos with automatic methods (3D-Convolutional Neural Networks) instead of tedious labelling by human experts. In particular, we are interested in the detection of the 17 musical performance gestures generated during the performance (guitar play) of musical pieces which have been video-recorded. In earlier work, these videos have been annotated manually by a human expert according to the labels in the musical analysis methodology. Such a labelling method is time-consuming and would not be scalable to big collections of video recordings. In this paper, we use a 3D-CNN model from activity recognition tasks and adapt it to the music performance dataset following a transfer learning approach. In particular, the weights of the first blocks were kept and only the later layers as well as additional classification layers were re-trained. The model was evaluated on a set of 17 music performance gestures and reports an average accuracy of 97.9% (F1:77.8%) on the training set and 85.7% (F1:38.6%) on the test set. An additional analysis shows which gestures are particularly difficult and suggest improvements for future work.

  • 17.
    Stefánsdóttir, Halla Steinunn
    et al.
    PhD Candidate, Lund University, Sweden.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Listening and Mediation: Of Agency and Performative Responsivity in Ecological Sound Art Practices2022In: Phenomenology & Practice, E-ISSN 1913-4711, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 115-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article approaches listening practices and the role of technological mediation within ecological sound art, building on findings through the artistic research practicesof the two authors. Through documentation of the authors’ ecological sound art practices of aeolian guitar performance, curation, composition, performance on found objects and field recording, we argue that phenomenological variation is inherent to the use of technology across all these forms of performative responsivity, as well as in the analytical forms of listening enacted through stimulated recall and micro-phenomenology. By unpacking the agencies at play in ecological sound art, we discuss how these artistic practices afford “unexpected ways” (Arteaga, 2017, p. 25) to knowledge. The article thus attempts to provide insight into human and non-human agencies at play in phenomenological approaches to ecological sound art and technological mediation, activated through listening.

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  • 18.
    Stefánsdóttir, Halla Steinunn
    et al.
    Musikhögskolan i Malmö, Lunds universitet..
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Participation and creation: towards an ecological understanding of musical creativity2019In: La Deleuziana: Online Journal of Philosophy, E-ISSN 2421-3098, Vol. 10, p. 371-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on artistic explorations of territorial and spatial forces through analysis of projects set in the natural landscape, in a specific indoor site or at the threshold between the two. Specific attention is given to the artistic processes at play in the transformation of materials created/collected in the natural environment when shaped for presentation in an indoor location. What is the relation between being and becoming in this liminal space? According to Erwin Straus, the impetus to this process is the pathic moment of sensation, a moment which evolves in two dimensions: as an unfolding of the world and of the self (Straus 1965). Louis Schreel argues that in Deleuze and Guattari, artistic practice activates a process in which «the work ‘captures’ forces at work in the world and renders these sensible. Its effects are above all real and not merely imaginary: the image is not a mental given but a concrete, existing reality» (Schreel 2014: 100). Here, Deleuze distinguishes between the percept – landscape in the absence of man – and affect, the non-human becomings contained in the artwork. This paper wishes to unpack these processes through a study of two concrete instances of artistic practice, aiming to create immediate interaction between musician and environment, in which either of the two authors took part.  

  • 19.
    Visi, Federico
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater. Fakultät Gestaltung, Universität der Künste Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Einstein Center for Digital Future, Berlin, Germany.
    Basso, Tatiana
    Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.
    Greinke, Berit
    Fakultät Gestaltung, Universität der Künste Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Einstein Center for Digital Future, Berlin, Germany.
    Wood, Emma
    Fakultät Gestaltung, Universität der Künste Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Gschwendtner, Philipp
    Fakultät Gestaltung, Universität der Künste Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Hope, Cat
    Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music and Performance, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Networking concert halls, musicians, and interactive textiles: Interwoven Sound Spaces2024In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 52-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interwoven Sound Spaces is an interdisciplinary project which brought together telematic music performance, interactive textiles, interaction design, and artistic research. A team of researchers collaborated with two professional contemporary music ensembles based in Berlin, Germany, and Piteå, Sweden, and four composers, with the aim of creating a telematic distributed concert taking place simultaneously in two concert halls and online. Central to the project was the development of interactive textiles capable of sensing the musicians’ movements while playing acoustic instruments, and generating data the composers used in their works. Musicians, instruments, textiles, sounds, halls, and data formed a network of entities and agencies that was reconfigured for each piece, showing how networked music practice enables distinctive musicking techniques. We describe each part of the project and report on a research interview conducted with one of the composers for the purpose of analysing the creative approaches she adopted for composing her piece.

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  • 20.
    Visi, Federico
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Ek, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Method Development for Multimodal Data Corpus Analysis of Expressive Instrumental Music Performance2020In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11, no 576751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Musical performance is a multimodal experience, for performers and listeners alike. This paper reports on a pilot study which constitutes the first step toward a comprehensive approach to the experience of music as performed. We aim at bridging the gap between qualitative and quantitative approaches, by combining methods for data collection. The purpose is to build a data corpus containing multimodal measures linked to high-level subjective observations. This will allow for a systematic inclusion of the knowledge of music professionals in an analytic framework, which synthesizes methods across established research disciplines. We outline the methods we are currently developing for the creation of a multimodal data corpus dedicated to the analysis and exploration of instrumental music performance from the perspective of embodied music cognition. This will enable the study of the multiple facets of instrumental music performance in great detail, as well as lead to the development of music creation techniques that take advantage of the cross-modal relationships and higher-level qualities emerging from the analysis of this multi-layered, multimodal corpus. The results of the pilot project suggest that qualitative analysis through stimulated recall is an efficient method for generating higher-level understandings of musical performance. Furthermore, the results indicate several directions for further development, regarding observational movement analysis, and computational analysis of coarticulation, chunking, and movement qualities in musical performance. We argue that the development of methods for combining qualitative and quantitative data are required to fully understand expressive musical performance, especially in a broader scenario in which arts, humanities, and science are increasingly entangled. The future work in the project will therefore entail an increasingly multimodal analysis, aiming to become as holistic as is music in performance.

  • 21.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Go to Hell: Some Reflections on the Role of Intuition and Analysis in Artistic Research2020In: Resonancias, ISSN 0717-3474, Vol. 24, no 46, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Go To Hell: towards a gesture-based compositional practice2016In: Contemporary Music Review, ISSN 0749-4467, E-ISSN 1477-2256, Vol. 35, no 4-5, p. 475-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses musical gesture from an understanding of musical perception as embodied and enactive, also drawing specifically on Denis Smalley’s [(2007). Space-form and the acousmatic image.Organised Sound,12(1), 35–58] analysis of performed space. I will provide examples of how choreographies (performed by musicians, with and without their instruments), new music (for Vietnamese and Western instruments), installations, and video art have all been drawn from analysis of gesture in Östersjö’s performance of the guitar compositionToccata Orpheusby Rolf Riehm [1990.Toccata Orpheus. Munich: Ricordi]. In Riehm’s piece, the bodily action of the performer is treated as an intentional compositional parameter and the notated structure thus generates a specific choreography in performance. InGo To Hell, this approach is taken further towards the development of a gesture-based compositional practice, where composition is understood, not as the organisation of sound objects, but as the structuring of gestural-sonic objects. 

  • 23.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Introduction to Part I2024In: Teaching Music Performance in Higher Education: Exploring the Potential of Artistic Research / [ed] Helen Julia Minors, Stefan Östersjö, Gilvano Dalagna, Jorge Salgado Correia, Open Book Publishers, 2024, p. 9-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 24.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre. Orpheus Institute.
    Listening to the Other2020 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our contemporary, globalised society demands new forms of listening. But what are these new forms? In Listening to the Other, Stefan Östersjö challenges conventional understandings of the ways musicians listen. He develops a transmodal understanding of listening that is situated in the body—a body that is extended by its mediation through musical instruments and other technologies. Listening habits can turn these tools—and even the body itself—into resistant objects or musical Others. Supported by extensive multimedia documentation and drawing on examples from the author’s own artistic projects spanning electronics, intercultural collaboration, and ecological sound art, this volume enables musicians to learn how to approach musical Others through alternative modes of listening and allows readers to discover artistic methods for intercultural collaboration and ecological sound art practices.

    This book is closely linked to a series of cutting-edge artistic works, including a triple concerto recorded with the Seattle Symphony and several video works with ecological sound art. It represents the analytical outcomes of artistic research projects carried out in Sweden, the UK, and Belgium between 2009 and 2015.

  • 25.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Musical and Musicianly Listening in Intercultural Practice2018In: Circuits: Musiques Contemporaines, ISSN 1183-1693, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the function of listening in intercultural musical collaboration, with reference to a number of examples taken from the author’s practice, within the Vietnamese/Swedish group The Six Tones. Through the lens of Pierre Schaeffer’s concepts of musical and musicianly listening, the paper suggests that inter-cultural exchange takes place in a liminal field between traditions. This demands a particular openness which can be developed by operating musicianly listening, a form of listening which actively seeks to “innovate in the facture of sound objects

  • 26.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Thinking-through-Music: On Knowledge Production, Materiality, Embodiment, and Subjectivity in Artistic Research2017In: Artistic Research In Music: Discipline and Resistance / [ed] Jonathan Impett, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2017, p. 88-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artistic research in music is now at a generational stage of development. How should it deal with its own maturing? From a kaleidoscope of individual pursuits, ethos and methodologies have emerged to encompass more distributed approaches. This transformation has taken place in parallel with changes in the dynamics and structures of culture, its institutions and constituencies. Artistic research maintains a productive dialectic between its potential status as discipline or as practice. It has developed topoi, tropes and its own canon of cases, texts and figures. How does it negotiate relationships with institutions, disciplines and bodies of theory while retaining the critical perspective of the artist?

  • 27.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Hultqvist, Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A deepened ‘sense of place’: Ecologies of sound and vibration in urban settings and domesticated landscapes2024In: Innovation in Music: Technology and Creativity / [ed] Jan-Olof Gullö; Russ Hepworth-Sawyer; Justin Paterson; Rob Toulson; Mark Marrington, London: Routledge, 2024, 1, p. 136-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Brooks, William
    University of York.
    Wells, Jeremy
    University of York.
    Footnotes2019In: Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the agencies of composer, performer and sound engineer respectively, and further of non-human agents such as score, instruments (widely defined), the concept of authenticity in the making of the premiere recording of William Brooks composition entitled Footnotes, composed  between 1983 and 1985, but never performed in its entirety before this recording by Stefan Östersjö. With the collaboration of Jez Wells, sound engineer, and William Brooks, a 45-minute LP was produced which aim to reconstruct the historical sound of certain musicians and recording technologies. The entire working process was documented on video and analysed using qualitative research methods. Early in their work it became evident to the three collaborators that the overall project required the construction of a set of different identities for six types of participant: guitar, guitarist; score, composer; hardware, engineer. This chapter—itself an intertangled multilogue of mutable voices—traces the construction of, distinction between, and eventual representation of, those identities in the final recordings, but most of all, through an analysis of the extended collaborative process.  

  • 29.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Clarke, Eric
    University of Oxford.
    Doffman, Mark
    University of Oxford.
    Gorton, David
    Royal Academy of Music.
    Fluid practices, solid roles?: The Evolution of Forlorn Hope2017In: Distributed Creativity: Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music / [ed] Eric Clarke and Mark Doffman, rd: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 116-135Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter investigates the relationship between the fluid practices that frequently characterize the work of contemporary musicians, and the more solid roles of performer and composer that continue to hold sway in contemporary music. Focusing on a case study of the collaborative creation of Forlorn Hope for eleven-string alto guitar and electronics, by Gorton and Östersjö, the chapter analyses the processes that lead from research and experimentation with particular guitar tunings and playing techniques, through a more conventionally compositional phase, to the first public performance of the piece. The chapter demonstrates how the affordances of both the instrument in the hands of Östersjö and the particular tuning specified by Gorton combined with improvised discoveries, and the ‘filtering’ force of a piece by Dowland, result in a piece whose creative ecology is distributed across a variety of timescales and practices.

  • 30.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Crispin, Darla
    The Norwegian Academy of Music.
    Musical Expression from Conception to Reception2017In: Musicians in the Making: Pathways to Creative Performance / [ed] John Rink, Helena Gaunt and Aaron Williamon, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 288-305Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The word ‘expression’, when applied to music, has a comfortably familiar ring to it. However, on careful scrutiny it turns out to be more elusive than one might think. Intrinsic to musical expression is the idea that within music there is something to be expressed, and that this might be reinforced (or undermined) by the performance strategies adopted. The issue becomes more complicated when one asks whether the ‘something’ in question equates to inchoate feeling, to apprehensible meaning or to both in variable proportions. This chapter reviews historical approaches to musical expression and argues that the concept of Werktreue still shapes much of our thinking and teaching in this area. This leads to a consideration of the respective roles of composer, performer and audience, generating a diagrammatic matrix which is progressively modified throughout the chapter. In its final, most dynamic version, the matrix proposes a ‘field of musical expression’ in which the roles of composer, performer and listener interact. The authors suggest that the time is ripe for more interdisciplinary research on musical expression, where a fusion of approaches—from music psychology and computing to performance studies and artistic research—may be the key to a deeper understanding.

  • 31.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Dahlqvist, Jörgen
    Teaterhögskolan i Malmö.
    Lindwall, Christer
    Topography of the (One): Reflections on Musical Time in Composition and Performance2019In: Aberrant Nuptials: Deleuze and Artistic Research / [ed] Paulo de Assis and Paolo Giudici, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses a composition for eleven-stringed alto guitar by the Swedish composer Christer Lindwall. Titled Topography of the (One), this piece may be understood as a meta-composition that reflects on the pre-conditions—both material and philosophical—for its stages of becoming. It thereby holds a special place in the compositional output of Lindwall, whose work has, since the late 1980s, been associated with the practices of New Complexity—composers such as Brian Ferneyhough and Richard Barrett. The conceptual nature of this composition, and its direct quotations from a series of contemporary French philosophers launched an interpretative process that led to a staging that would—as Steven Schick wrote in his discussion of the process of learning Ferneyhough’s Bone Alphabet—“shape and make inevitable an interpretive context which steers the piece in performance” (Schick 1994, 133). The first performance was to take place in a production titled “Words and Music” during the Transistor Festival in Malmö, Sweden, curated by the Swedish playwright and director Jörgen Dahlqvist. A dialogue was launched between Östersjö and Dahlqvist that resulted in a staging that focused entirely on the creation of a sonic framework for the performance. The dramaturgical means were the addition of electronic sound, first by the creation of an introductory tape part, and, second, by doubling up the recited fragments with sampled voice of the same performer, also creating a sonic questioning of the unity of the “one.”[1]The compositional strategies, launched by the composer’s philosophical reflections, in turn become the source for a series of observations regarding musical time, which we address by returning to Deleuze’s writing in Difference and Repetition(1994). 

  • 32.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Gorton, David
    Royal Academy of Music, London.
    Austerity Measures I: performing the discursive voice2019In: Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019, p. 29-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter approaches the question of subjectivity in the musical practice of composer and performer through a discussion of the emergence of ‘voice’. Part 1 describes a theoretical model by which the subjectivities of performer and composer can be understood in terms of this emergence, arguing that a musician’s ‘voice’ is continually defined through interaction with cultural and psychological tools, such as scores, compositional systems, and musical instruments. These ‘voices’ are explored through the ways they combine within a collaboration to form a ‘discursive voice’. Part 2 presents an analysis of four video recordings made of Austerity Measures I for ten-string guitar by David Gorton, performed by Stefan Östersjö at the ORCiM Research Festival in 2014. This composition requires the solo guitar player to cut materials away across a series of repetitions, replacing them with silence. The analysis draws on quantitative measures of timing and performer movements, and qualitative measures of perceived phrasing structures and performance gestures. While each of these analytical methods alone provides some insight into the performance strategies in the recordings, in the shaping of phrases as materials are cut away, and the structural significance of bodily movement, a much richer understanding is sought through their combination. In doing so the analysis aims to shed light on the interrelations between the embodied knowledge of the performer and the musical structures in the score, and further, between the subjectivities of composer and performer unfolded through the composition and performance of Austerity Measures I. Ultimately this chapter aims to provide analytical evidence for the ‘discursive voice’ within the artistic practice of the authors.

  • 33.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    A Swedish Perspective on Artistic Research Practices in First and Second Cycle Education in Music2024In: Teaching Music Performance in Higher Education: Exploring the Potential of Artistic Research / [ed] Helen Julia Minors, Stefan Östersjö, Gilvano Dalagna, Jorge Salgado Correia, Open Book Publishers, 2024, p. 13-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 34.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    Malmö Academy of Music.
    Arrival Cities: Hanoi2019In: Voices, Bodies, Practices: Performing Musical Subjectivities / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019, p. 235-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter outlines the role of subjectivity and intersubjectivity in the creation of Arrival Cities: Hanoi, a piece of experimental music theatre with documentary film. The piece seeks a new format for politically informed theatre which is responsive to the challenges of a globalized society. A central concept for the dramaturgy was to make the individual memories of the performers a cornerstone for each situation. Hence, similarly to how the script in verbatim theatre is drawn from interviews with people’s experience of a real-life situation (Forsyth & Megson, 2009), the dramaturgy emerged, as it were, from the creation of situations that would evoke the lived experience of the performers. The stage is set up so that the three performers either play their instruments or tell stories in a position at the front of the stage, where three microphones on stands are placed. The storytelling was developed from memories of encounters with people in migration zones in Hanoi, but would even more draw on personal memories from the city.

    Arrival Cities: Hanoi aims to create a space where the boundary between fiction and documentary is dissolved.  While it has been essential to remain in what the performers perceive as the authentic experience in the storytelling, the audience cannot really know whether the stories told by the performers are authentic experiences or scripted dialogues. In  the piece, the documentary material forms part of a multi-layered narrative, without laying out the footage as a documentation. The storytelling places the performers on stage as individuals rather than as actors, an approach which is essential to the political aims with the production. This presence in the moment of performance accompanies the images of the street vendors and other people in the documentary.

    Empathy and the sharing of individual life stories became the central nodes in the making of Arrival Cities: Hanoi. It is a piece of music theatre without a script, but with a musical and dramaturgical structure. The role of the documentary is manifold. It is a means for a political engagement but also creates memories and images that can be shared and transformed in the performance. Intercultural music and theatre operate in a liminal space between traditions. Aesthetic choices are therefore difficult to negotiate. Without trust and empathy, these negotiations cannot reach beyond the surface. Intercultural collaboration always demands from each individual to give up a piece of the self. In ArrivalCities: Hanoi, composer, director, and performers were all engaged in such learning processes.

  • 35.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    Vietnam National Academy of Music, Vietnam.
    Attentive Listening in Lo-Fi Soundscapes: Some Notes on the Development of Sound Art Methodologies in Vietnam2020In: The Bloomsbury Handbook of Sonic Methodologies / [ed] Michael Bull; Marcel Cobussen, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020, p. 481-496Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses Vietnamese soundscapes with a particular interest in the politically and culturally embedded complexity of their history. An account of the history of sound art practices in Vietnam is drawn from interviews with artists who have been central to these developments. Further, the authors argue that these practices have emerged out of an engagement with the rapidly shifting soundscapes of the country, also often triggered by a wish to activate memories of lost sounds.  Finally, the chapter also refers to the authors’ collaboration with the filmmaker Trịnh Minh-hà, on the music for her most recent film, Forgetting Vietnam, the making of which spans the short history of sound art in Vietnam, and which engages with memory and forgetfulness in ways that are coloured also by the particular perspective of diaspora. 

       The chapter gives special attention to what Schafer would call the ‘lo-fi’ character of much of the soundscapes found in the natural environment in Vietnam. The density of imprints from human activity is high, also on the Vietnamese countryside. In the city, on the other hand, the soundscape is also characterized by the sound of guestworkers from the countryside, providing yet another perspective on the multi-layered sonorities of Vietnam. 

  • 36.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Malmö Academy of Music, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    Malmö Academy of Music, Malmö, Sweden; Vietnam National Academy of Music, Vietnam.
    The politics of listening in intercultural artistic practice2017In: Studies in Musical Theatre, ISSN 1750-3159, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 131-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers an analysis of the function of listening in the musical practice of the Vietnamese/Swedish group The Six Tones, based on video documentation recorded between 2006 and 2011. A discussion of the function of openness, drawing on Gadamer, and the distinction between ‘musical’ and ‘musicianly’ listening suggested by Pierre Schaeffer provides the ground for an understanding of mutual learning in cross-cultural artistic practice. Östersjö and Nguyễn identify the same principles in the making of two music theatre works, Idioms (2010–11) and Arrival Cities: Hanoi (2014–15) together with the Swedish playwright and director Jörgen Dahlqvist. The authors, who are both performers in the group, argue that true listening must build on trust that also allows the participating artists to accept the opacity of the other. The ethics implied by the notion of the ‘right to opacity’ also become the ground for a discussion of a politics of listening. Here, the authors claim, following Attali, that the political dimensions of intercul- tural musical practice can be traced in the hybridity that characterizes the artistic output.

  • 37.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    Malmö Academy of Music.
    The sounds of Hanoi and the after-image of the homeland2016In: Journal of Sonic Studies, E-ISSN 2212-6252, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the soundscape of Hanoi and of the countryside north of Hanoi in the Bac Ninh province with the experience of the two authors as artists in two collaborative projects, Arrival Cities: Hanoi and Que/Homelands. The content is structured in three layers, a conversation between the two authors on their individual experience of the projects, a jointly written text which takes a more distant perspective to the topic and a series of video and audio files taken from the two artistic projects. While the two projects were completely independent, this paper identifies ways in which they complement each other and, taken together, the sound art collected within the projects may have a further political meaning. The authors suggest that the shifting soundscapes of Vietnam are a direct reflection of social and political change in the country.

  • 38.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Nguyễn, Thanh Thủy
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hebert, David G.
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Frisk, Henrik
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shared Listenings: Methods for Transcultural Musicianship and Research2023Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Element demonstrates how a combination of stimulated recall and collaborative autoethnographic strategies can be applied to artistic and scholarly work at the intersection of ethnomusicology and practice-led-research. The authors relate recently collected material from fieldwork in Vietnam to the long-term method development within the Vietnamese/Swedish group The Six Tones, of which three authors are the founding members. The discussion centers around the inter-subjective forms of stimulated recall analysis, developed through the creative work of this innovative intercultural music ensemble. The aim of this Element is to create a decolonized methodology—for both music performance and research—and it provides a detailed account of this method development starting in 2006. Furthermore, the authors discuss how this practice was successfully shared with three master performers in the south of Vietnam as part of a collaborative project in 2018–2019.

  • 39.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Composer, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Aeolian Duo at Edsviken2021Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    These site-specific improvisations were recorded on a stony shore by Edsviken, north of Stockholm. Here there is water passing between stony shores and cliffs, in sight of apartments, villas, boat houses and Ulriksdals slott, a castle from the 17th century. The area is replete with the sounds of boat engines and the distant motorway, water both still and stirred, distant bells and all manner of land and water birds.  Stefan Östersjö plays aeolian guitar, an acoustic instrument, with strings extending out from the bridge, strung around trees on the site. The extended strings allow the performer to capture harmonics played by the wind, but also to control their pitch, and the number of strings playing. Katt Hernandez plays a violin with a low scordatura. She is focused on extending the sound and voice of that instrument through twin practices of playing with a varied array of improvising musicians from all walks of life, and of playing with animals, birds and all manner of inanimate entities in long walks across all the cities where she has lived. Here, she played to unite the sounds on the site with the sound worlds created by the aeolian guitar through the multi-faceted use of extended techniques drawn from those years of listening. These respective ecological sound-art practices seek a connectedness to place through immediate interaction with the elements at play on the site. Although a particular stillness characterized Edsviken on this day, in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, the amount of activity is also striking. Not only do a few motor boats occasionally pass at a distance, but ducks sometimes dominate the soundscape, while the ever changing sonorities of the waves on the shore continue to ornament the shifting inflections of the duo improvisations. So they played at Edsviken one afternoon in July – the water, the motors, the birds and Stefan and Katt – on an outcropping of the stoney shore, between the forest and the water.

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  • 40.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Gorton, David (Composer)
    Royal Academy of Music, London.
    Sheppard Skaerved, Peter (Conductor)
    Royal Academy of Music, London.
    Consort Set in Five Parts (after William Lawes)2023Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "Consort Set in Five Parts" by British composer David Gorton is a composition which is about music from the 17th century, not in the sense of history, but rather as a journey: a personal exploration of the music of that period. Rather than playing it, Gorton "plays with" this music, as he puts it. His works are neither pure editing nor pure composition, but are somewhere in between. The original sources are always present, but are transformed into something unfamiliar. In this work, the similarly title work by William Lawes is transformed and commented on in a small consort setting of period instruments, with the addition of the contemporary 11-string alto guitar. the piece forms part of a great number of works created by David Gorton in collaboration with the Swedish guitarist Stefan Östersjö. 

  • 41.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    David Gorton: Variations on John Dowland2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    John Dowland’s pavan Lachrimae was one of the hits of the early 1600s: musicians all over Europe made their own versions of it. The English composer David Gorton (b. 1978) proves that Dowland’s fascination endures, with this album of music that has its points of departure in Dowland, linking his time and ours over a span of 400 years – with a dig at some contemporary politicians along the way.

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    Skivomslag
  • 42.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Composer, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Hogg, Bennett (Composer, Creator)
    University of Newcastle.
    Snell, Merrie (Videographer, Creator)
    University of Newcastle.
    Devil's Water: audio and video installation2019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Devil’s Water is a piece of ecological sound art recorded by Bennett Hogg and Stefan Östersjö at Devil's Water, Northumbria, 21-22 Maj 2013. On site, Hogg and Östersjö built a sculpture of a guitar placed in a tree, strung with fishing line to trees down by the shore. The recordings feature Hogg playing violins, bowed by sinking the body into the current, and Östersjö performing on the guitar-violin-tree sculpture. Mixed and edited at The Music Studiosand at Culture Lab, University of Newcastle.  The video was created by Merrie Snell, using documentary footage from 2013 as well as additional shootings made with Hogg and Östersjö at Devil's water in August 2016. A first film version was premiered at Panora cinema, during the Transistor Festival in Malmö in May 2017. This audio and video installation, using the same material, was premiered at Cheeseburn Sculpture Gardens, and screened in the Chapel on June 29-30 2019.

    The production of the soundscape recording in 2013 was carried out by Hogg and Östersjö within a two year artistic research project with The Landscape Quartet, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, headed by University of Newcastle. A DVD with the film version of the piece will be released in the Orpheus Institute series, Leuven Univertsity Press in 2020. 

  • 43.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Bhagwati, Sandeep (Composer)
    Concordia University, Montreal, Canada.
    Exercises in Estrangement I2023Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by this freely adapted couplet from the prominent Vietnamese poet Nguyễn Duy, which he wrote thinking of his compatriots in foreign lands, this concert’s unique piece, Exercices d’étrangeté I (Exercises in Estrangement I) by Sandeep Bhagwati, revolves around the notions of proximity and distance, closeness and farness, familiarity and estrangement, expressed not only through music, but also through words and images.

    The soloists from different musical and geographical backgrounds, each with their own tradition (popular, baroque, jazz, experimental, interdisciplinary) and context (Vietnam, Sweden, Canada, Québec) rediscover and reimagine their instruments and traditions by immersing themselves in various musical situations devised by the composer. Short segments are arraigned and layered into a rich musical journey that lets each performer become familiar with the “strange” artistic universes of their friends and travel companions in this musical adventure.

  • 44.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Brooks, William (Composer, Creator)
    University of York.
    Wells, Jeremy J. (Recording engineer, Creator)
    University of York.
    Footnotes2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Footnotes is a composition by the American composer Bill Brooks from 1983-86. This recording also constitutes the first complete performance of this highly unique and demanding solo work for the instrument. The process of creating this version of the piece is discussed in a recent book chapter by Brooks, Östersjö and the sound engineer Jez Wells. The artistic process has been documented and analyzed as part of a research cluster exploring musical subjectivity at the Orpheus Institute in Gent. 

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    sleeve notes
  • 45.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Infiltrations2022Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The music of the Swedish, but Paris-based, composer, Madeleine Isaksson, is at the core of this concert, and not least the premiere of her new chamber work, Infiltrations where the concert hall organ mixes with electric guitar and acoustic instruments. Isaksson’s music is characterized by her clear, poetic touch, which can often be heard in her chiseled sounds and long, musical lines. Regarding the almost 20-year-old work Fibres, Isaksson talks about the thread as a musical metaphor. A long, drawn-out musical line becomes surrounded and ornamented by the various instruments. In the new work, Isaksson’s choice of organ and electric guitar in the instrumentation is tonally motivated, to bind the ensemble together. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Programme Book
  • 46.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Composer, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Hultqvist, Anders (Composer, Creator)
    Högskolan fölr scen och musik, Göteborgs universitet.
    Berg, Jan (Sound designer, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Media, audio technology and theater.
    Invisible Sounds: Piteå Port2019Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Locust Wind, rattle and hum2022Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The composer's programme note on the CD reads: 

    Locust wind, rattle and hum (2002-2013) for guitar and electronics was written for the Swedish guitarist Stefan Östersjö. It belongs to a series of pieces I have written for solo performer and electronics. Like in the previous pieces of this series (Elpia II, STRINGendo, Flautando), the playing of the performer is transformed into MIDI data. The MIDI data is processed on four independent layers by a computer program I've written which then control a sampler, playing all sorts of sounds and noises previously recorded from the particular instrument. Pitches and velocity values can be transformed, notes can be delayed, a played note can trigger many other notes etc. Each of the processing parameters can either be exactly determined, or it can be defined as a random interval within which the processing will be carried out. The live performance keeps the piece fresh while the fact that processing is done on four separate layers enables the performer to trigger complex musical textures. Furthermore, „tape“ parts are played back in some sections of the piece.

    • Executive Producer: John Oliver
    • Editing and mixing: Rainer Bürck
    • Mastering: John Oliver
    • Cover photo: Reimo Võsa-Tangsoo
    • Cover design: Seiya Oliver
    • Booklet design: John Oliver 
  • 48.
    Westberg, Erik (Conductor, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Visi, Federico (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Ek, Robert (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Petersson, Mattias (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa (Choreographer, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Music, Media and Theater.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Composer)
    Monteverdi e più: Erik westbergs vokalensemble i nytolkningar och nya verk för kör, dansare och interaktiv hyperorgel2023Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Programblad
  • 49.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Instrumentalist, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Karpen, Richard (Composer, Creator)
    University of Washington.
    Nam Mai/Strandlines2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two pieces that form the content of this CD are cornerstones in the later work of the American composer Richard Karpen. They share a radical approach to musical composition, which has brought Karpen into in-depth collaborations with a number of musicians from very different traditions over the past fifteen years. With a wish to explore forms of musical creation emerging from the very fabric of the sounding material, rather than from the abstraction of the written score, this music is largely conceived through joint exploration, and through the concrete listening characteristic of electronic music composition.

    Strandlines, a large-scale piece for 6-string guitar and computer, was formational in this development. The piece was created in 2006 and 2007 through an extensive collaborative process, involving Richard Karpen and the guitarist Stefan Östersjö. There is no musical score for StrandlinesInstead, the composition is defined through its performed materials and a shared understanding for how these are developed in interaction with the live processing, programmed in Supercollider. Two previous works, Anterior View of an Interior with Reclining Trombonist(2002) for trombone and live electronics with Stuart Dempster and Aperture(2006) for viola and live electronics with Melia Watras explored these modes of creation. But in Strandlinesthe collaborative processes were furthered considerably and with more mindful intention. This is how Karpen describes the working  process:

    While this kind of experientially developed music has existed in many cultures, I am equally interested in developing the role of the composer/author. I’m drawn to the kinds of techniques that film director Mike Leigh uses for character and plot development in his films. Leigh works with his actors to create their characters through an organic and rigorous series of directed improvisation and reiteration until the actors fully embody their characters, their utterances, and the relationships between all of the interacting characters and situations within the environment of the work. Through this process the film becomes its own screenplay. In the case of my own explorations in this mode of composing, the music is itself the score.

    Strandlinesalso explores the extension of instrument and performer through live computer enhancement and processing. It is a work not so much for guitar as for guitarist, the merging of person and instrument. In the case of Strandlines, Stefan Östersjö’s integral role in the development of guitar material seems more about who he is as a performing artist than about the guitar.

    But what kind of work is Strandlines? The greater form is firmly fixed, but the individual details vary according to the different characteristics that define each section of the piece. This is a type of work that bears similarities to music in many extra-European traditions. Turning to Roland Barthes one may say that it is “a music that is not abstract or inward, but that is endowed, if one may put it like that, with a tangible intelligibility, with the intelligible as tangible”. However, while the identity of Strandlines may be similar to other complex, non-notated forms of music, such as an Indian raga, its stringent form and the overall sound of the work is coherent with the earlier compositions in Karpen’s output, thereby combining a performative identity with the structural complexity of contemporary western traditions.

    The working methods developed by Karpen and Östersjö in the making of Strandlineshave proved to be particularly fruitful in intercultural collaboration, and the second piece on the CD - Nam Maí, for three soloists, nineteen string instruments and film, composed for the The Six Tones and string players of the Seattle Symphony - is the outcome of extensive work in this domain.

    Nam Maíis the third and most ambitious work with the Six Tones employing these methods of collaboration with a larger group of performers. The first of these, based on the work on Strandlinesof Karpen and Östersjö led to the making of a piece of music theatre titled Idioms(2010-11). Here, The Six Tones, a trio consisting of Östersjö and two Vietnamese master performers - Ngô Trà My and Nguyễn Thanh Thủy - were joined by actors from Sweden, Vietnam and the USA.  The collaboration also involved the Swedish playwright and director Jörgen Dahlqvist who developed devising methods inspired by the making of Strandlines. Idioms was eventually followed by the making of Seven Stories, a feature-length dance film inspired by traditional Vietnamese Tuồng theatre subjects, which added choreographer Marie Fahlin to the artistic group.

    In the process of creating Seven Stories, a piece of traditional Vietnamese music became the central material in one scene, but at the same time, also gave rise to ideas for a new composition, for three soloists and orchestra. This traditional piece is often called Nam Máiand is commonly found in Tuồngtheatre, a Vietnamese form of theatre which shares common traits with Beijing opera. It is in the Aimode, which affords a grave and serious expression. Since Tuồngis dramatic theatre, normally also bent towards tragedy, this mode is rather common here. Nam Mái made its way into the collaboration between The Six Tones and Richard Karpen, in the morning of the second working day on the film Seven Stories. We had set out on a project which was to follow dogma-like rules: each scene should relate to a story from a specific play from Tuồng Theatre. Its choreography should be developed from gesture in this scene and the music should be created on the same day as the film was shot. The film was also to be a documentary of its own creation. The play for the second day was Đào Tam Xuân, the story of a female general whose husband was executed due to the ill doings of the queen, and subsequently, her son was killed when attempting to prevent the execution. We started the session by presenting music from Tuồng theatre to the artists involved. As the first piece, Nguyễn Thanh Thủy played Nam Mái, and we decided on the spot to use it for this scene. This is how Richard Karpen describes his encounter with the piece:

     

    I was immediately drawn in to Nam Mái. It was not a matter of simply “liking” the melody or being attracted to the musical qualities. In the case of Nam Mái, hearing it created an instant response in my thoughts and in my body. I heard it as if I had heard it before and it opened up a range of abstract memories and feelings. There is certain music that acts like a “carrier signal”, in fact I now think that this is exactly what Music mostly is in general. As our brains “process” musical “signals”, deep memory connections are triggered, as if we were searching for meaning, perhaps scanning memory in order to assemble an "image" in order to decode the carrier. It seems that emotional memory is where the brain finds the most effective set of pathways for decoding music and so our response is emotional. One could make the point that all sensory stimulation acts as a carrier that triggers memory. But we’re talking about music and my experience and analyses over many years is that music is an especially complex carrier signal that the brain processes by searching deep and wide across ”universal” and individual experience, not of music but of everything.

    A couple of weeks before the premiere, all artists got together in Seattle to create the solo parts and finalize the role of video and choreography. Some months before, Karpen had finished the score to the piece, which is through composed in the orchestral part, but leaving the staffs for the soloists blank, and also with a number of fermatas indicating the placement of cadenzas for one or more of the three soloists. The orchestral score is entirely drawn from the musical structures in Nam Mái and is organized in a manner which gives a certain set of freedom and constraints for the soloists.

    One could think of the orchestration in Nam Máia bit like a set design, providing a series of distinct scenes for the three solo instruments, or, as Richard Karpen put it in conversation with the conductor Stilian Kirov before the recording session with the Seattle Symphony: “think of the orchestral part as the music in a film and that the solo parts are the film”. Indeed, the score also obtained this function of a set in the working sessions in Seattle. With Karpen’s analogy then, we met to start making the film together, a bit like the filmmaker Mike Leigh would draw his actors together to start creating the script and the film through a collaborative process.

    In a recent book chapter on the function of trust in musical performance, Anthony Gritten reminds us of how “interaction without trust has no pragmatic means to get itself beyond microscopic, atomistic, local interactions and begin developing its own self-sustaining ecology”. The ecology created in the world of the work titled Nam Maí involves the agreements between Karpen and each musician on the specific shape of musical materials, of how they develop and relate to larger structures. Further, the musical form is drawn directly from the interaction between the three performers.

    This kind of trust is inherent to any of the compositional projects carried out by Karpen and various performers, especially over the past fifteen years. Certainly, a composition like Strandlineswould not have happened without the ecology of musical collaboration. But Nam Maíseems to make this dependence on trust even more underlined, perhaps because it involves more people and a collaboration across cultures. Trust is written into the score, not just through the absence of written instructions in the solo parts but also in the ways in which the orchestral score constitutes a fabric, clearly intended for the voice of three specific performers to join in, to align with, to resist, to develop its musical content. Ngo Trà My describes her experience of the collaboration with Karpen as a negotiation of individual license and a search for a space in which a common ground can be created:

    The way that Richard set the piece up, I can float freely in the material from Nam Mái, operating the playing techniques and the sonority of the đàn bầu. I know that I cannot fully understand the intentions that Richard had with the piece but I can still draw out my own story from my subjective experience of the music, so that my sound is brought together with the sonority of the entire piece, as if we were telling the same story. 

    Richard Karpen’s compositional output since the early 2000s points beyond old paradigms in Experimental western music, discovering new modes of musical creativity drawn from approaches to complexity more ancient than the invention of musical notation. The two compositions on this CD are the result of extensive collaborative exploration, where the voice of each participating artist is essential to the identity of the final work. 

  • 50.
    Ek, Robert (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Musician, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    New Directions 20202020Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Cathedra I-III är en komposition av tonsättaren Kent Olofsson, för solist och kammarensemble. Solisten styr en konserthusorgel med en MIDI chapman stick. Härigenom skapas ett hyperinstrument av orgel och elgitarr. Verket utarbetades i nära samarbete med solisten Stefan Östersjö och uruppfördes i en direktsänd konsert i Sveriges Radio P2.

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    fulltext
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